Back to the summit

2007 Summit

Washington, D.C.

The Academy of Achievement brought 300 graduate students from 50 countries to Washington, D.C. for the 46th annual International Achievement Summit, June 19-23, 2007.

The American Academy of Achievement returned to Washington, D.C. for the 2007 International Achievement Summit. From June 19 to 23, nearly 300 graduate students from 50 countries gathered to learn from the experience of the world’s leading figures in the arts and sciences, sports and entertainment, business, politics and public service. Twenty-nine new honorees were inducted into the Academy, joining a constellation of returning honorees and special guests for a series of symposium sessions and panel discussions held in the most historic and inspiring locations of our nation’s capital. Members of the Academy, new and old, stayed at the elegant Hay-Adams Hotel, facing the White House across Lafayette Park.

First Lady Laura Bush, a 2007 Academy guest of honor, welcomes the student delegates to the Achievement Summit.
First Lady Laura Bush, a 2007 Academy guest of honor, welcomes the delegates to the Achievement Summit.

Members of the Academy and special guests attending the 2007 Summit included: the 42nd President of the United States, William J. Clinton; First Lady Laura Bush; the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, John Roberts, and Justices Anthony M. Kennedy and Ruth Bader Ginsburg; Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi; Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid; Senators Chuck Hagel and Barack Obama; Secretary of the Treasury Henry M. Paulson; Secretary of Defense Robert Gates; Attorney General Alberto Gonzales; CIA Director Michael V. Hayden; Deputy Secretary of State John D. Negroponte; Congressman John Lewis; the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Peter Pace; former NATO Commanders Wesley Clark and Joseph Ralston; the Mayor of Chicago, Richard M. Daley; Nobel Peace Prize recipients Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Elie Wiesel; recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Professor Toni Morrison; Pulitzer Prize authors Thomas Friedman, N. Scott Momaday, Suzan-Lori Parks, Dana Priest, Neil Sheehan and Lawrence Wright; Congressional Medal of Honor recipients Michael Thornton and Thomas Norris; track and field legend Sir Roger Bannister; Basketball Hall of Fame honoree Kareem Abdul-Jabbar; Super Bowl champion quarterback Peyton Manning; Olympic Gold Medalists Andre Agassi and Dorothy Hamill; two-time Best Actress Oscar recipient Hilary Swank; filmmaker George Lucas; best-selling author Calvin Trillin; and country music sensations Brooks and Dunn.

Justice Anthony M. Kennedy addresses Academy student delegates at the International Achievement Summit.
Justice Anthony M. Kennedy addresses Academy student delegates at the International Achievement Summit.

The Host Chairman of the 2007 Summit was Catherine B. Reynolds, Chairman and CEO of The Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation. The Summit was made possible by a generous grant from The Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation.

Chief Justice John Roberts and Council member Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks with the Academy students.
Chief Justice John Roberts and Council member Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speak with the Academy students.

The week’s events opened on a characteristically dramatic note on Tuesday, June 19, with an evening at the United States Supreme Court. The Academy’s student delegates, many of whom had only arrived from overseas an hour or two earlier, were transported to the Court by motorcade with police escort. On arrival, they were received in the Courtroom by Chief Justice John Roberts, along with his colleagues, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, both members of the Academy’s Awards Council. In the informal discussion that followed, the Justices surprised many of the students, not only with their warmth and good humor, but with their spirit of collegiality. Far from presenting the image of a court divided into opposing camps, the Justices emphasized their common commitment to the Constitution and to the pursuit of impartial justice.

Journalists Sam Donaldson and Neil Sheehan, General Wesley Clark, and Medal of Honor recipients Tommy Norris and Michael Thornton discuss the lessons of the Vietnam War in a session among the monuments of Washington.
Journalists Sam Donaldson and Neil Sheehan, General Wesley Clark, and Medal of Honor recipients Tommy Norris and Michael Thornton discuss the lessons of the Vietnam War in a session among the monuments of Washington.

Immediately after their question-and-answer session with the Justices, the student delegates were treated to an elegant dinner in the majestic Great Hall of the Court. Before returning to their hotel for the evening, the students took a tour of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the Lincoln Memorial. At the Lincoln Memorial, they took part in an unusual discussion of the Vietnam War and its relevance to the war in Iraq, moderated by veteran broadcaster Sam Donaldson. The panel’s participants were the renowned Vietnam War correspondent Neil Sheehan, along with three veterans of that conflict: General Wesley Clark, and Medal of Honor winners Michael Thornton and Thomas Norris.

White House Chief of Staff Josh Bolten addresses Academy students at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building.
White House Chief of Staff Josh Bolten addresses Academy students at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building.

The following morning, the student delegates took a tour of the National Archives, where they saw the famous Charters of Freedom: original copies of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. In the Archives’ state-of-the-art MacGowan Theater, they heard from a number of distinguished Academy members, including the acclaimed author of Memoirs of a Geisha, Arthur Golden; David Rubenstein, the founder of private equity giant The Carlyle Group; consumer advocate Ralph Nader; and Dr. Ian Frazer, creator of the human papilloma virus vaccine, the first vaccine to offer immunity against a specific form of cancer.

Presidential adviser Karl Rove engages Academy students in a spirited give-and-take during the Academy Summit.
Presidential advisor Karl Rove engages Academy students in a spirited give-and-take during the Academy Summit.

In the afternoon, a large contingent of student delegates continued their exploration of the frontiers of medicine, traveling to the sprawling campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in nearby Bethesda, Maryland. There, they met with some of the distinguished Academy members from the medical sciences: the Director of NIH, Dr. Elias Zerhouni; Dr. Francis Collins, the Director of the National Human Genome Project; the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Dr. Anthony Fauci; and Dr. Steven Rosenberg, the Director of the National Cancer Institute. Students also met with a number of the Institute’s patients — men and women whose illness had not responded to conventional treatment but are now recovering and resuming normal lives through Dr. Rosenberg’s revolutionary immuno-therapy. Dr. Rosenberg and his colleagues urged the Academy’s student delegates, many of them medical scientists themselves, to continue exploring the unsolved mysteries of health and disease. Dr. Zerhouni recalled the feelings that led to his own breakthroughs in medical imaging: “Let me find a better way.”

U.S. Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson takes questions from student delegates in an afternoon symposium session.
U.S. Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson takes questions from student delegates in an afternoon symposium session.

That same afternoon, another contingent of Academy student delegates was taken for a rare behind-the-scenes visit to the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, where much of the work of the White House staff is done. In Room 450, the familiar setting of televised press briefings, the students heard candid off-the-record remarks from the White House Chief of Staff, Josh Bolten, and from Deputy Chief of Staff Karl Rove, who surprised many of the students with his self-effacing good humor in the uninhibited give-and-take of a long question-and-answer session. Two new Academy members from the upper reaches of government also spoke with the Academy’s students: the top-ranking officer in the United States military, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Peter Pace; and Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson, who not only discussed his role as the federal government’s chief financial officer, but his previous career as Chairman of the banking house Goldman Sachs, and as head of the world’s largest environmental organization, The Nature Conservancy.

Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg discusses his cancer research with student delegates at the National Institutes of Health.
Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg discusses his cancer research with student delegates at the National Institutes of Health.

From the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, student delegates traveled to the Department of Justice, where they were met by Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and other top-ranking officials, including the FBI’s Assistant Director for Counterterrorism, Joseph Billy, Jr., and the federal government’s chief litigator, Solicitor General Paul Clement.

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a recipient of the Golden Plate Award, addresses the Academy students.
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a recipient of the Golden Plate Award, addresses the Academy students.

That evening, all of the Academy’s student delegates visited the Caucus Room of the Russell Senate Office Building. Amidst the high, coffered ceiling and imposing columns of this room, where so many historic Senate hearings have taken place, they heard from the ranking member of the upper house, Majority Leader Harry Reid. The excitement rose with the arrival of the charismatic Senator from Illinois, Barack Obama, who paid gracious tribute to Academy member Desmond Tutu, a hero of the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska charmed the students with his down-to-earth manner and self-deprecating humor. All three Senators were inducted into the Academy of Achievement by Archbishop Tutu. Following their evening at the Russell Building, the students were taken to the Hall of Flags at the United States Chamber of Commerce for a dinner with the many members of the Academy who had arrived in Washington throughout the day. During the evening, student delegates Michelle Branch and Jessica Harp, also known as the Wreckers, performed a set of songs from their Grammy-nominated debut album.

U.S. Senator Barack Obama speaks about his lifelong passion for social justice at the 2007 Achievement Summit.
U.S. Senator Barack Obama speaks about his lifelong passion for social justice at the 2007 Achievement Summit.

Thursday morning, the entire assemblage of Academy members and student delegates traveled to the State Department, where Academy members conducted a fascinating symposium on world affairs. A. Scott Berg, a past recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for Biography, discussed his research for an upcoming book on President Woodrow Wilson, architect of the United States’ leading role in international affairs. Legendary investigative journalist Bob Woodward discussed the war in Iraq and the leadership of President Bush. Lawrence Wright, recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for his book on the terrorist group Al Qaeda, discussed his adventures as an investigative reporter in the Middle East. Washington Post reporter Dana Priest, who was also honored with a Pulitzer for investigative reporting, discussed her exposés of CIA secret prisons, controversial methods of interrogation, and unacceptable conditions in the outpatient facilities at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

Archbishop Desmond Tutu, recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, addresses the Academy at the State Department.
Archbishop Desmond Tutu, recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, addresses the Academy at the State Department.

One of the most inspiring addresses of the week came from Archbishop Desmond Tutu. The Archbishop filled the hall with laughter when he presented the Biblical story of the Annunciation in the form of a knock-knock joke, before making a more profound point about the universal call to serve a cause larger than ourselves. The assembly enjoyed luncheon that day in the diplomatic reception rooms of the State Department, with their priceless collections of historic artifacts.

2007 Academy honoree Nora Ephron, award-winning screenwriter, novelist and director, reminisces on her career.
2007 Academy honoree Nora Ephron, award-winning screenwriter, novelist and director, reminisces on her career.

The afternoon session resumed at the Chamber of Commerce, with Academy member Dr. Benjamin Carson discussing his odyssey from the ghetto to the operating theater, where he has performed groundbreaking surgeries on the human brain. Scientific presentations during the Summit ranged from the cosmic to the microscopic. Astrophysicist Dr. John Mather demonstrated his Nobel Prize-winning discoveries concerning the microwave background radiation of the universe. Later in the Summit, Dr. Craig Mello made a breathtaking animated presentation of his discovery of RNAi, the “interfering” protein that regulates many phenomena of heredity and immunity.

Suzan-Lori Parks, recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, charmed students with her ebullient presentation.
Suzan-Lori Parks, recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, charmed students with her ebullient presentation.

A panel discussion on social entrepreneurship, led by former presidential advisor David Gergen, featured Academy member Wendy Kopp, the founder of Teach for America, along with special guests Mike Feinberg, Kirsten Lodal, Jon Schnur and Billy Shore, who have all founded nonprofit organizations to provide quality education to disadvantaged youth.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi with Elie Wiesel and his wife, Marion, on the Speaker's balcony at the Capitol.
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi with Elie Wiesel and his wife Marion on the Speaker’s balcony at the Capitol.

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks delighted the audience with her effervescent personality, while making a more serious point, that public recognition of any professional accomplishment imposes a greater responsibility to society. Later in the Summit, the novelist and poet N. Scott Momaday also made a memorable appearance, telling three Native American tales — legends and fables that illustrate the unique viewpoint of his ancestral culture. Thursday afternoon’s program concluded with a bracingly witty address from the bestselling author and filmmaker Nora Ephron.

Golden Plate Awards Council member and Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley and his wife, Maggie, at the Capitol.
Golden Plate Awards Council member and Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley and his wife Maggie at the Capitol.

More remarkable experiences awaited the Summit participants. On Thursday evening, the student delegates were taken for a private tour of the United States Capitol, ending with a dinner in the Capitol’s famed Statuary Hall. The entire assembly of students and Academy members traveled from the Capitol to the Cannon House Office Building through the underground passage used by members of Congress. At the Cannon Building, they heard from three exceptionally distinguished members of the Academy. First, they were welcomed by the Speaker of the House, Nancy J. Pelosi. Congressman John R. Lewis, a hero of the 1960s Civil Rights movement, made an impassioned and inspiring address. Congressman Lewis reminded the Academy’s students of what the movement had accomplished without the aid of cell phones, the Internet, or any of the other communications technology that are now considered so essential to political activism.

Speaker Pelosi and Congressman John Lewis greet President Clinton at the International Achievement Summit.
Speaker Pelosi and Congressman John Lewis greet President Clinton at the International Achievement Summit.

The unmistakable high point of the evening came with the arrival of the 42nd President of the United States, William J. Clinton. President Clinton spoke at length, touching on a vast range of issues, from Iraq to global warming. He asserted that solutions to a wide range of problems, from health insurance to the conflict between Israel and Palestine, are already within reach. The outlines of successful compromise are well known to policy makers, he insisted; all that remains is the political will to effect them. That impetus, he emphasized, will not come from elected political leaders. It must come from civil society and the people themselves.

Conservationist Richard Leakey and entrepreneur John Morgridge engage in a discussion of environmental issues.
Conservationist Richard Leakey and entrepreneur John Morgridge engage in a discussion of environmental issues.

The former president happily took challenging questions from the student delegates, supplying thorough, detailed answers to every question. In his most emphatic point, President Clinton noted that all human beings share more than 99 percent of their DNA. Like the Supreme Court Justices and the U.S. Senators who spoke earlier in the week — and like Desmond Tutu, who spoke that morning — President Clinton emphasized the need to concentrate on the universal aspirations that unite us all, rather than the relatively trivial differences that divide us.

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Academy member Thomas L. Friedman discusses the global climate crisis.
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Academy member Thomas L. Friedman discusses the global climate crisis.

Friday morning’s session at the Chamber of Commerce opened with a good friend of the Academy, Congressman Ed Markey, one of the House’s established leaders on environmental issues. The Congressman led an informative discussion of Global Warming and the Environment with a distinguished panel of Academy members: marine biologist Sylvia Earle; paleoanthropologist and conservationist Richard Leakey; and John Morgridge, the business leader responsible for the success of Cisco Systems, who is now Chairman of The Nature Conservancy.

University presidents Shirley Ann Jackson and John Sexton with U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings.
University presidents Shirley Ann Jackson and John Sexton with U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings.

Famed journalist Thomas Friedman, the recipient of multiple Pulitzer Prizes, addressed a number of topics in a wide-ranging conversation, but concentrated on the climate crisis and related environmental issues. Author Calvin Trillin followed with a deadpan recitation of his own career as a journalist and creative writer that had the audience of 500 dissolving in laughter while he retained his eternally dry, unflappable composure.

Super Bowl champion quarterback Peyton Manning joins the Academy at the International Achievement Summit.
Super Bowl champion quarterback Peyton Manning joins the Academy at the International Achievement Summit.

Financier and philanthropist Mike Milken discussed his path to success in business and his prodigious charitable ventures. Legendary filmmaker George Lucas recalled the persistence that enabled him to succeed in a competitive field, while emphasizing the responsibility of men and women in all walks of life to serve a calling higher than mere self-interest.

The student delegates were surprised by the arrival of Hilary Swank, the compelling star of such films as Boys Don’t Cry and Million Dollar Baby, roles that earned her two Oscars as Best Actress. In an utterly unpretentious and candid address, she discussed her grueling physical preparation for these demanding roles. Nothing worthwhile can be accomplished without complete dedication, she affirmed, and no award or other form of public recognition can take the place of the satisfaction that comes from continually meeting fresh challenges. The morning’s session ended with a deeply moving appearance by Elie Wiesel, recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Speaking in hushed tones, Wiesel held the audience spellbound as he described how the murder of his family, and his own experience in the concentration camps of World War II, inspired him to travel the world as a journalist, author and witness, exposing injustice wherever it arises.

First Lady Laura Bush receives the Golden Plate Award from famed Olympic ice skating champion Dorothy Hamill.
First Lady Laura Bush receives the Golden Plate Award from famed Olympic ice skating champion Dorothy Hamill.

During a luncheon session, two pioneers of human stem cell research, Dr. James Thomson and Dr. John Gearhart, gave an intimate presentation of their research to a select group of the Academy’s student delegates in the medical sciences. That afternoon’s program began with an exceptional discussion of education policy, moderated by David Gergen. The Academy members who formed the panel are among the nation’s most distinguished leaders in the fields of education policy: the Secretary of Education, Margaret Spellings; Chicago Mayor and education reformer Richard M. Daley; New York University President John Sexton; MIT President Susan Hockfield; and physicist Shirley Ann Jackson, the President of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Tennis champion and 2007 honoree Andre Agassi with Congresswoman Jane Harman with her husband, Sidney.
Tennis champion and 2007 honoree Andre Agassi with Congresswoman Jane Harman with her husband Sidney.

The final speakers of the afternoon were some of the most distinguished athletes and artists the United States has produced, beginning with basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and tennis champion Andre Agassi. The only living American recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Professor Toni Morrison, made an eloquent address and received an enthusiastic reception from the student delegates.

Legendary Broadway director Harold Prince receives the Golden Plate Award from Nobel laureate Toni Morrison.
Legendary Broadway director Harold Prince receives the Golden Plate Award from Nobel laureate Toni Morrison.

Legendary theatrical director Harold Prince discussed his extraordinary half-century career. The last speaker of the afternoon was the quarterback of the world champion Indianapolis Colts, Peyton Manning. Manning is not only a champion on the gridiron, but an exceptionally active philanthropist, who devotes his time away from the football field to an array of innovative charitable activities.

Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn, recipient of 26 Academy of Country Music awards, receive the Golden Plate Award from Council members U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings and U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales.
Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn, recipients of 26 Academy of Country Music awards, receive the Golden Plate Award from Council members U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings and U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales.

The 2007 International Achievement Summit culminated in the black-tie Banquet of the Golden Plate at the historic Mellon Auditorium, transformed for the occasion into a glittering banquet hall, brimming with flowers. The Academy’s Class of 2007 was inducted into the Academy, beginning with First Lady Laura Bush, who made a characteristically warm and gracious address, thanking the Summit’s host, Catherine B. Reynolds, and praising the accomplishments of a number of Academy student delegates, past and present, including Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page. Academy members and students enjoyed a splendid meal and shed the solemnity of some of the week’s more serious discussions to enjoy the rollicking music of Gretchen Wilson and Academy honorees Brooks and Dunn.

The Director of the CIA, General Michael Hayden, is presented with the Golden Plate Award by John Negroponte.
The Director of the CIA, General Michael Hayden, is presented with the Golden Plate Award by John Negroponte.

One might have wondered how an audience of serious young scholars, fresh from Oxford, Cambridge and the Ivy League, would respond to the uninhibited sounds of heartland America, but when Brooks and Dunn kicked into their signature song, “Boot Scootin’ Boogie,” students, statesmen, distinguished political commentators and Nobel Prize-winning scientists all took to the dance floor.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Peter Pace, with Council member Secretary of Defense Robert Gates.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Peter Pace, with Council member Secretary of Defense Robert Gates.

As speakers from Archbishop Tutu to President Clinton had reminded the assembly over the past week, human beings have far more in common than dictators and hate-mongers would have us believe. Opposing parties, different religions, half a hundred nations — all met on the dance floor at the Mellon Auditorium to celebrate the joy of living in a world of limitless opportunity. The following morning, Academy members and student delegates returned to their respective homes, fired with renewed inspiration to dedicate their own unique talents to the common cause of all humanity.

Hilary Swank, recipient of two Oscars for Best Actress, with U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson at the Banquet.
Hilary Swank, recipient of two Oscars for Best Actress, with U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson at the Banquet.

Andre Agassi
Sportsman and Philanthropist
Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn
Kings of Country Music
Laura Bush
First Lady of the United States
Brian J. Druker, M.D.
Developer, Gleevec Leukemia Drug
Laurence D. Fink
CEO, BlackRock, Inc.
Ian Frazer, M.D.
Developer, Cervical Cancer Vaccine
Chuck Hagel
United States Senate
General Michael V. Hayden, USAF
Director, Central Intelligence Agency
Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D.
Science and Education
Craig C. Mello, Ph.D.
Nobel Prize in Medicine
John P. Morgridge
Pioneer of Silicon Valley
Barack Obama
44th President of the United States
General Peter Pace, USMC
Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
Henry M. Paulson, Jr.
U.S. Secretary of the Treasury
Dana Priest
Pulitzer Prize for Journalism
Harry Reid
Majority Leader, U.S. Senate
Calvin Trillin
Humorist and Novelist
Lawrence Wright
Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction
Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D.
Director, National Institutes of Health

The heartfelt enthusiasm and genuine, unaffected gratitude of the student delegates are among the most rewarding aspects of the International Achievement Summit. We invite you to share in their close encounters with Academy members and fellow delegates, as described in their own words.

Brian A. Levine

Brian A. Levine

Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellow for Social Entrepreneurship, New York University School of Medicine

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

Over the last eight months since the 2007 International Achievement Summit, I have undergone an unbelievably exciting transformation. My metamorphosis began with my participation in the inaugural class of the NYU Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Graduate Fellowship in Social Entrepreneurship. Through this fellowship I had developed a strong desire to make a sustainable impact upon the world, but was unsure of how best to do that. I came to the Summit hoping to gain direction and better understand my potential.

While at the Summit, I took every opportunity to speak with fellow student attendees, interact with speakers, and most importantly, reflect upon each activity’s meaning and purpose. I had breakfast conversations about global health, lunch discussions about social innovations, and even received expert advice from Summit presenters such as Chris Matthews, Ralph Nader, David Gergen, Ed Markey and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, to name a few.

By the time I left the Summit, I was absolutely invigorated, and ready to act. Building upon the connections that I had made, I kept in touch with many of the participants and presenters, emailing them questions, honing my ideas, and refining my social entrepreneurial goals. Ultimately, I devised an ambitious project and felt equipped to move ahead.

The original idea was to create a website that would serve as a venue for online discussions of patient management and other academic discussions for physicians in Ghana. I went to Ghana in October 2007 and realized, after spending just a few days in Ghana, that the current technological infrastructure was unable to support the website that I had designed and that access to the internet was going to become a major impediment.

I had gone halfway around the world, and my project failed! However, taking into account everything that I learned at the Summit, I realized that most innovators fail multiple times, until they “get it right.”

As all the presenters advised, I took time to reevaluate my plan and strategy, and ultimately realized I needed to shift my approach. Instead of creating a website to serve as a communication tool, I could focus on creating communication with whatever tool was possible. And with that, this new project was born.

Having gained confidence from the Summit, I walked into the main offices of Ghana Telecom and asked to speak with the CEO of the mobile phone division (Onetouch). I explained to him my idea to market his cell phone company as the first company in the world to unify an entire country’s physician base on a single cell phone carrier. After two hours of lively discussion, he agreed and put a plan in writing. Within hours I was meeting with the General Secretary of the Ghana Medical Association, and later that week, I was overseeing a joint meeting between the Ghana Medical Association and Onetouch in which an innovative program was created.

Through this unique agreement, as of January 1, 2008, all registered Ghanaian physicians have the ability to call and SMS all other registered Ghanaian physicians free of charge, as well as dial a toll-free number from their Onetouch handset to speak with a live operator for other physicians’ contact information.

By having all of Ghana’s physicians on a unified network, information can freely flow from physician to physician, as well as from other agencies to physicians. In the event of an emergency or disaster, physicians can be easily sent an SMS, helping to save precious time when it counts most. In addition, physicians can call other physicians to refer patients to specialists, and then also follow up with that specialist after the care has been given. My hope is that Ghanaian physicians ultimately will no longer feel geographically isolated, regardless of where they practice, because another physician is now only a phone call away.

Because of the synergy between my experiences in the Reynolds Program in Social Entrepreneurship and those at the International Achievement Summit, I have begun a lifelong career of social entrepreneurship. When I started medical school, I never thought in my wildest dreams that I would be working in West Africa developing cell-phone based technologies for physicians. And now, less than a year after the Summit, as I am about to graduate in the first cohort of NYU Reynolds Fellows, I have learned first-hand about the limitless impact that each of us can have provided we are relentless in our pursuits.

Thank you for shaping me into the person I am today, and for putting me on the path of becoming one of the leaders of tomorrow.

Sincerely,

Brian A. Levine


Brian Levine graduated cum laude from Cornell University and received his master's degree in biology from New York University. As a student in the University's Honors Research Program, he has spent several years studying the molecular mechanisms underlying infertility. He serves as a scientific reviewer for the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology; his own research has appeared in numerous medical journals. In 2007 he completed his third year of medical school, and was a member of the inaugural class of the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Graduate Fellowship in Social Entrepreneurship. He looks forward to using new technology to raise public awareness of the devastating effects of sexually transmitted diseases, and of the societal ramifications of female infertility.

Thomas V. Johnson III

Thomas V. Johnson III

Gates Cambridge Scholar, Centre for Brain Repair, University of Cambridge

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I write this letter having just returned from the 46th annual International Achievement Summit in Washington, D.C. This is my first day back in the laboratory and I have spent all morning in an attempt to convey to my colleagues just how inspiring and influential the past week has been for me. As I recount the remarkable events that have taken place, everyone hearing my stories is absolutely astounded by my experiences at the Summit. And yet, I feel that I am barely able to adequately convey the importance that this Summit has had on my life. It is not simply the opportunity to meet extraordinary people nor to hear brilliant speeches that touched me most profoundly, but rather the emotions that have been stirred deep within that have really impacted my being.

As a neuroscientist and an aspiring physician, I was particularly taken aback by the time I was able to spend with the Academy’s honorees in the fields of science and medicine. Dr. Steven Rosenberg’s description of immuno-therapy for cancer would have been impressive in its own right, but introducing us to two of his patients undergoing the successful treatment regimen demonstrated how significant one’s touch on the world can be for individual people. I can’t help but think that perhaps this experience represents the essence of greatness — one betters the world as a whole by making positive impacts on the lives of individuals. At the Summit, I was impressed by Dr. Craig Mello’s presentation regarding his discovery of RNA interference. Being able to sit down and talk with him about the process of scientific discovery at a post-dinner reception, however, was an experience I’ll never forget. Dr. Mello advised me of the perseverance that one must exhibit to be successful in the field, but also described the excitement and amazing sense of satisfaction that arrives during that “Eureka” moment when you discover something new about the world that no one had ever known before.

This morning, I described to my lab mates the surreal experience of sitting in the courtroom of the Supreme Court of the United States of America as Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Ginsburg and Kennedy explained what it is like to serve at the highest level of the U.S. Judiciary. I recalled the time we spent in the Senate building listening to the inspiring words of Senators Reid, Obama, and Hagel. My friends were in awe as I told them of President Clinton’s speech and his candid responses to the subsequent question and answer session. I explained how each of these experiences painted real-life pictures of greatness and inspired the listeners to commit themselves to improving the world. Still, I am at a loss to fully describe the fire that was lit inside me as each of these amazing people called upon us student delegates to lead tomorrow’s world. I was so humbled and, at the same time, felt so empowered by the encouragement of today’s leaders.

I think that, for me, the most eye-opening aspect of the Summit was making the realization that all of these great people who have forever impacted the course of human civilization are but human themselves. We, as student delegates, have been afforded the opportunity to peer into the world of greatness. I was extremely humbled by the accomplishments of the Academy’s honorees, and yet I was most impressed by how down-to-earth and genuine they all were. True, having a conversation with Dr. Ben Carson was inspiring because he is an unspeakably talented neurosurgeon who has accomplished amazing things. What touched me more deeply, however, were his gifts of encouragement and the assertion that we could all affect the world to a similar extent. Indeed, my experience at this Summit was most inspiring not simply because I met great people, but because I was so strongly encouraged to pursue greatness myself. As such, this experience serves as an incredible source of motivation and inspiration to continue working for the betterment of society. As I return to my laboratory today, I feel the need to double my efforts in developing my skills to become a clinician-scientist, which will allow me to treat patients and touch individual lives and, in doing so, to improve the world as a whole.

In sum, my time at the International Achievement Summit has been one of the most absolutely inspiring and formative five days of my entire life. I feel humbled but also empowered to go forth and pursue great challenges in an effort to better our world. Of course, Mrs. Reynolds, l owe this experience and all of the consequential emotions and inspiration to you and your foundation. It is your generosity that has allowed me and the other student delegates to experience and understand greatness, and you have provided for each of us further motivation to achieve it ourselves.

I am certain that the world will continue to benefit from your kindness and vision. It is with my absolute sincerest gratitude that I wish to thank you for this extraordinary opportunity.

Sincerely yours,

Thomas V. Johnson III


In 2005, Thomas V. Johnson III graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Northwestern University with a bachelor's degree in biological sciences, with departmental honors. In 2005 and 2006, he worked at the University of Nebraska Medical Center as a research associate in the Department of Ophthalmology. He has spoken at medical conferences and published journal articles presenting his research in glaucoma. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in brain repair as a Gates Scholar at Cambridge University. Upon completion of his doctorate, he will begin medical school at Johns Hopkins. He plans to dedicate his career as a clinician-scientist to the treatment of glaucoma.

Keon West

Keon West

Rhodes Scholar, Balliol College, Oxford University

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

No letter could do justice to the impact that the 2007 International Academy of Achievement Summit in D.C. had on me. I had read about the Summit. I had read about the Golden Plate Awardees of previous years. I had even read the letters of thanks of other student delegates. Still, I was unprepared. As I boarded the flight out of D.C., I knew that I would never again be the same.

My fellow delegates were the first to drastically alter my worldview. My roommate, Syga Thomas, who had already lived, worked and volunteered in Cuba, Costa Rica and Japan, would spend his free time brushing up his seventh language — Portuguese. Serah Makka, who had worked in Afghanistan and planned to return to her home in Nigeria to encourage economic development, reminded me of the importance of going back to my own country. Everyone I spoke to filled me with wonder at the things that they achieved while still so young and often from such humble backgrounds. My own accomplishments were quickly put in perspective. I believed that in the first few hours I had used up all the awe I had.

I was terribly wrong. For within 24 hours my arm was around the shoulder of that great visionary and “Rabble-Rouser for Peace,” Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Shortly after, he delivered an address to the delegates calling us all to a new state of unity, love and understanding. To hear such a message from such a man was overwhelming.

I was nine years old when I first read the book Gifted Hands by Dr. Benjamin Carson. My whole life I have admired him for his insight into his country and his world, for his bravery in surmounting near-impossible odds, for his unshakable faith in God, and for his incredible humility in the face of so much achievement. Not only did I see him and hear him give quite possibly the most moving speech of the Summit, I was able to eat lunch with him and converse with him. Daily. Daily! We shared information about our mutual passions for changing systems of oppression in this world. I offered him my views of the books he had written. And he listened. And he responded!

Indeed, the mealtimes were every bit as inspiring as the presentations. They were the times when I could chat in French with Dr. Elias Zerhouni about French-Algerian relations.

Over breakfast, Dr. John C. Mather, a Nobel Prize-winner for his work on the Big Bang, explained his beliefs about God, physics and the creation of the universe to an eager table of delegates hungry for much more than waffles.

For one, brief, shining moment Hilary Swank and I had our arms around each other.

And there were several moments when I was simply stunned beyond words. Hearing the Supreme Court Judges explain in such eloquent simplicity the gravity of the Constitution of the United States of America, I saw that country, my country, all countries indeed, in a new way. Wisdom flowed out of them, pressed and distilled by 400 years of struggle for genuine independence. And listening to the wit, humor, and modesty of the Honorable Chuck Hagel reminded me of his humanity, and taught me in the clearest of ways, that great achievement is open to us all, even the most human amongst us. And the ground beneath my feet trembled when William Jefferson Clinton, the 42nd President of the most powerful country on Earth, looked me dead in the eyes to answer my question.

In what other place, and at what other time, could one hope to be in the company of such people? The Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation blew away the limitations of the universe I lived in and expanded my mind so ferociously that it took weeks to understand what had happened. Thank you so much, Mrs. Reynolds, for investing in me, and for opening the eyes of so many eager young people to a world they never dreamed possible. As long as I live I will treasure this time and this great gift you gave to all of us. A new me was born from this Summit, one refilled with hope, and awe, and inspiration. You encourage so many to make this world a better place, and for that we could never thank you enough.

With deepest gratitude,

Keon West


At Macalester College in Minnesota, Keon West graduated with one bachelor's degrees in psychology and French, both magna cum laude. A member of Phi Beta Kappa and President of the Macalester chapter of the Psi Chi national psychology honors society, he wrote his honors thesis on the effectiveness of race-related classes in reducing implicit and explicit forms of racism. After briefly studying philosophy and psychoanalysis at the Sorbonne in Paris, he received the Rhodes Scholarship from Jamaica, and is now pursuing a Ph.D. in social psychology at Oxford. In his first term as a graduate student, he founded the Black Association of Rhodes Scholars.

Mitchell R. Lunn

Mitchell R. Lunn

Howard Hughes Fellow, Stanford University School of Medicine

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

From the depths of my being, I wish to extend my most heartfelt thanks for amazing experiences at the Academy of Achievement’s 2007 International Achievement Summit in Washington, D.C. Three weeks have passed since I returned to California, and I continue to be amazed at how much I took away from the Summit. Not a single day passes during which I do not recall the surreal encounters of those four days and, more importantly, the lessons imparted onto all delegates by the most amazing achievers in our society. Please permit me to share a few of my experiences with you.

As I continue to tell friends, family, and colleagues about the Summit, I frequently recount the discussion that several other delegates and I had with Ralph Nader and Prof. Marvin Minsky beginning at 12:30 AM at the beautiful Hay-Adams Hotel. Conversing and arguing about the democratic presidential candidates, we ended up being kicked out of the reception room so the hotel staff could go home. Continuing in the hotel lobby, Dr. Minsky and I discussed the fall of American newspaper sales due to a variety of factors including Internet distribution and poor marketing. We ended the evening (at 1:30 AM!) discussing Dr. Minsky’s area of artificial intelligence (AI), specifically how AI continues to fail with complex problem solving, and the current efforts in the field to classify problems so that AI can use the correct rule sets to solve them.

As a scientist and future physician, what a pleasure it was to see and meet such distinguished and inspiring figures as Drs. Benjamin Carson, John Mather, Ian Frazer, and Craig Mello. A group of my fellow scientists/physicians in training and I met Dr. Mello one evening; he recounted his discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and when it became clear that RNAi was indeed something huge and revolutionary to science. Dr. Mello and I, as a virologist, discussed RNAi pathways in antiviral defenses and the future of harnessing RNAi to combat infection. His candor and easygoing attitude made it a true pleasure to learn about his stimulating career, his truly monumental discovery, and his life after the Nobel ceremony.

Sitting on the bus after dinner at the US Capitol, Dana Priest sat down next to me and posed the simple question, “What do you do?” The ensuing conversation centered on viruses — the two that I study, polio virus and dengue — and the threats of current and emerging infectious diseases including avian influenza and tuberculosis. Intimately familiar with the horrors at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Ms. Priest was no stranger to the effects of infection on human health. Our conversations continued during a reception the next evening with dialogue about her experiences inside Walter Reed, her career path, and her highly successful life in journalism. The importance of perseverance, a lesson iterated by many members of the Academy, was omnipresent in every aspect of her life, especially when she encouraged us to never lose sight of our goals.

Equally as interesting as all the members of the Academy were the amazing students from across the world. Over the course of the Summit, I met many inspiring colleagues from Boston to Russia and from England to the San Francisco Bay area. Paired with an Aussie roommate, we discussed the announcement of Dr. Ian Frazer as “Australian of the Year.” A physician and Ph.D. student, my roommate was utterly pleased that (finally!) a scientist was given this honor instead of a sports figure. Upon hearing Dr. Frazer speak at the National Archives, it was clear that his development of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine has the capability to have one of the largest impacts on human health in the next 50 years. The Summit spawned several new friendships including one friend that I will be visiting when passing through Minneapolis in early August. Excitingly, the Summit also enabled me to reconnect with an old friend and colleague with whom I used to work at Columbia University.

At the end of those fabulous days, I left feeling a bit confused: Should I rekindle my dream to write a book? Should I work to end health disparities in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community? Should I affect health policy through leadership in government and non-government organizations? While I expect to do all of those during my career, one thing was lucid and resonated with every single student delegate: we all have the ability and the unquestionable responsibility to make a difference in our world. As Elie Wiesel said, “The worst sin is to be a spectator… There is ‘response’ in responsibility.” In order to do so, we must get over our fear of failure — a fear that we all agreed is strongly present. Hilary Swank told us, “The greatest obstacle in life is yourself,” and President Bill Clinton drove that point home when he said, “The failure to try will deaden your life.”

Sitting here in Palo Alto, my mind races with things I must do during my life to continue to affect positive change for society. The Academy of Achievement’s International Achievement Summit has catapulted me into a novel state of mind. The inspiration received and contacts made will carry me forward with humility to pursue my passion while serving humankind for my entire life. Thank you again for bestowing upon me the honor to attend this amazing event, and I hope that our paths will cross again soon.

Mitchell R. Lunn


As an undergraduate at Tufts University, Mitchell Lunn assisted in the creation of undergraduate research programs that have now become university institutions. His studies of the pediatric genetic disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and at Columbia University led to his discovery of a novel therapeutic candidate for SMA, now in development. At present, Mr. Lunn is pursuing medical studies at Stanford University. He spent the past year as a Howard Hughes Fellow, researching innovative antiviral strategies to combat dengue virus. He looks forward to a career combining public health research, teaching, and clinical practice.

Obianuju Jennifer Obi

Obianuju Jennifer Obi

Susan J. Blumenthal Scholar, Harvard Medical School

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I wish to express my heartfelt gratitude for providing me with the opportunity to attend the 2007 International Achievement Summit in Washington, DC. A simple “thank you” seems too trite, so I apologize in advance for the length of this letter. It was truly an eye-opening experience — one that will forever be etched in my mind and my spirit. I had no idea what to expect when Admiral Susan Blumenthal, a wonderful mentor and role model, nominated me to attend as her delegate. I am honored and gratified that she did, for I left with intense feelings of inspiration, energy, and reaffirmation.

My inspiration stemmed from meeting and interacting with the brilliant minds of today’s world community. Each and every single day, I saw and heard a group of educated, talented, and diverse achievers talk about their journeys of success and failures as well as their passions. I felt honored and humbled at the same time, for I never could have imagined being able to listen to Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Elie Wiesel, and others speak to me with such candor and vigor.

Mrs. Rosenberg, the wife of Dr. Steven Rosenberg, Director of the NIH Cancer Institute, noticed that I was in awe of so many important people and whispered to me: “Don’t worry. They are just people too.”

It gave me the encouragement to approach Ralph Nader and engage him in a debate on healthcare reform as well as with Warner Brothers producer Kevin McCormick about “blood diamonds” in Sierra Leone.

Additionally, I felt so energized by the superb speakers — they just exuded confidence, passion, and sincerity. Suzan-Lori Parks, for example, while standing on one leg like a flamingo, offered advice such as to “practice radical inclusion.” This message compelled me to move beyond my comfort zone to engage with fellow delegates about methods of rebuilding the community of New Orleans or about immigration reform.

Additionally, Thomas Friedman remarked that “If it’s not being done, it’s because you are not doing it.” This comment, when combined with Congressman Ed Markey’s charge to us, “You are the green generation — you have the science, technology — now add to it the commitment to protect our planet,” and Richard Leakey’s words, “It doesn’t matter whose fault it is; it only matters if we can do something about it,” left me feeling particularly revitalized to take those chances and leaps to explore other opportunities — talk to people whom I would not dare dream of talking to — Nobel Prize winner Dr. Mello, director George Lucas, publisher Phyllis Grann and many more!

Additionally, another event that energized me was during the Friday evening Gala when Kix Brooks from Brooks and Dunn jumped off the stage during one of their soul-jarring and body-moving songs to grab my hand and proceed to twirl me around. I could not stop smiling about it afterwards — when can I ever say that I danced with a music legend? The whole entire night was amazing, with people dancing left and right — Gold Medal winners with student delegates!

More importantly, I came away from this conference feeling reaffirmed about my future aspirations. Working with Dr. Blumenthal in her capacity as Assistant Surgeon General of the United States, a champion for women’s and global health, has been instrumental in me realizing my goals and encouraging me to work at the interface of public health, human rights, and social well-being. Making it possible for me to attend this conference is just another example of her commitment — allowing me to see that I am not alone in wanting to bring about real, sustainable change in our country and world. Throughout the conference, I noticed that many of my fellow student delegates expressed similar values of bringing about world change. The concept that there are never enough hours in the day became readily apparent during the four-day conference when I often found myself crawling into bed around 3 a.m. after talking, debating, and laughing with my peers. Hailing from diverse backgrounds (from India to South Africa; from education to business; from liberal to conservative) only added to the richness of our conversations. This feeling of reaffirmation was further solidified on Saturday morning when Mrs. Carson (the wife of Ben Carson) remarked to me and three other students that we “are the future — the talented bunch.” I am confident in Mrs. Carson’s words, for I can foresee myself and fellow peers becoming lifelong partners in the mission for change and opportunity for all.

As you can see, Mrs. Reynolds, I thoroughly enjoyed myself and feel very fortunate to have had the opportunity to attend. Your work and the mission of your organizations and the staff of the Academy of Achievement behind the scenes made the event so memorable and the experiences so diverse, allowing the student delegates to immerse themselves in the brilliant creativity of the Academy members and Academy’s vision that individuals and education can change the world. Thank you again for this extraordinary opportunity — it came at an important time in my life, providing me with great inspiration, energy and reaffirmation to make a lasting difference in my community, country and the world.

Obianuju Jennifer Obi


Obianuju Obi graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 2004, with honors, from the History and Science Departments and from the Department of Mind, Brain, and Behavior. After graduation, she worked with the Assistant Surgeon General at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She is now in her second year at Harvard Medical School, where she participates in the International Negotiation Initiative, a joint project of Harvard's Medical and Law Schools. She looks forward to working with the international community of public health scholars and practitioners to prevent violence and to control its traumatic effects on immigrant communities.

Matthew J. Spence

Matthew J. Spence

Marshall Scholar, Oxford University and Yale Law School

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I have just returned home from the International Achievement Summit and I cannot stop talking about it with everyone at home. I wanted to write you immediately with my enormous thanks for making it possible for me to attend.

The experience is still surreal. How do you explain a week having drinks with Chris Matthews and Ralph Nader one night, while spending the next talking with Hilary Swank about what lessons President Clinton shared in the two hours he spent with us? Of the many things for which I have to thank you, what stands out are two gifts this past week gave me: some uncommon wisdom from our notable speakers about how they navigated some of the career choices I am facing now, and new friendships with the other student delegates that I know will be lasting. For all of this, thank you.

One of the most memorable elements of the Summit was the personal stories of struggle that some of the speakers shared with us. President Clinton’s wisdom, in particular, stood out. “Everyone suffers personal attacks in politics,” President Clinton told us. “And as I’ve gotten older. I’ve become better at understanding the difference between what I can control and what I cannot.” What President Clinton said mattered most was how someone attacks you, since in politics and public life anyone who tries to do something of meaning will be attacked: “Ninety percent of an attack,” he told us, “is how you respond.” President Clinton shared an insight Nelson Mandela gave him: “I was talking with him once, and I said, ‘Nelson, I know how courageous it was to invite your former jailors to your inauguration and to invite former members of the apartheid government to join your cabinet. But, between you and me, you know it’s also good politics. Didn’t you still just hate them?'” Clinton said that Mandela told him that for the first eleven years he was in prison he indeed did hate his jailor. But, at some point after that, President Clinton said Mandela told him, “I saw they had taken everything from me. They controlled my life. They beat me. They stopped me from seeing my children grow up. They caused the breakup of my marriage. And I realized at one point that the only thing they could not take from me was my heart and my mind. I could still control that. They could not make me hate them. I still had the power to choose how to respond and I did.”

Clinton paused and said, “Then Nelson stopped and pointed his finger at me — and this was in the middle of my impeachment — and he said, “Now you remember this.”

I have heard President Clinton speak countless times before — on television, and even in person. But I never expected to hear these personal lessons and stories from him. I could continue on for pages about more of the same. Woodrow Wilson’s biographer described President Wilson’s lessons of following your passion to success rather than some forty-year plan you hatched when you graduated from college. Andre Agassi described how he returned to win the French Open just weeks after his divorce. Being in the same room, sharing the struggles and wisdom with those who have achieved beyond what anyone could have expected of them, was a rare opportunity. I cannot thank you enough for making that possible for me.

One of my other most treasured parts of this week are the new friendships with the other student delegates. There is something unique to take all of us away from our daily routines of school, jobs, and endless setting of goals — and to bring us together to reflect. That shared experience creates friendships over days and hours that would in any other place take years to form. My roommate founded a growing Internet startup company. A new friend from Los Angeles is working on global health. Another is publishing path-breaking work on understanding ethnic conflict and civil wars. The emails are already flying between us, and we’re talking about where to meet next. Our shared experience of this past week has already formed an uncommon bond among many of us, and I am still amazed and inspired by those I met. The best part is that I know it is just the beginning.

I could go on for much longer about this unique and unforgettable experience you gave me in Washington this past week. As I begin my clerkship for Judge Posner next year after my first year of practicing law, I know the choices in my career and personal life that are quickly coming ahead. As I think about this, the lessons and friendships from the International Academy of Achievement Summit will be among the first thoughts that come to mind.

For all of that and more, I am deeply grateful to you. Your generous sponsorship of my attendance at the week made all of this possible for me. I am humbled by the experience and tremendously thankful for your support. I know this week was just the beginning of joining this amazing community. I look forward to seeing you again, and hope someday to give back in some measure what you so generously gave me last week.

Sincerely,

Matthew J. Spence


A 2006 graduate of Yale Law School, Matt Spence is now an attorney, practicing international and criminal law in San Francisco. He received a doctorate as a Marshall Scholar at Oxford University. He has worked as an elections monitor in Kosovo and as a lecturer in International Relations at Oxford University. He is the Co-chair of the American Bar Association's Working Group on Corporate Social Responsibility. In July, he will begin a clerkship with Judge Richard Posner on the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals. His book about American efforts to promote democracy after the Cold War will be published by Oxford University Press later this year.

Karsten DaPonte

Karsten DaPonte

Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

Just one week after the Academy of Achievement’s International Summit, I am still in awe of the experience in which I was a very fortunate participant. Looking back, to prior to the event, I wasn’t able to tell my friends or family what I was in for… and I couldn’t ever have predicted that it would be as fulfilling or inspiring as it ultimately was. Thank you!!!

Not knowing too much about the Academy of Achievement, my understanding of the purpose of the event developed a bit over the first day or two. It was actually Suzan-Lori Parks who put it in the clearest terms, from my perspective… The comment that struck me most was her statement that the types of awards, accolades and achievements to which many of us (student delegates and honorees) could become quite accustomed come with a fine print: that these honors come with the responsibility to lead and act in a manner which brings credit to your country, trade, and passions — all in pursuit of helping others and bringing about positive change in the world.

The gathering of guests, speakers, facilitators, and honorees was inspirational to say the least.

My fellow student delegates and I felt that we were being engaged by these amazing people as peers to work together towards improving our world.

The topics were relevant and important. I’ll close this brief thank you (the length couldn’t possibly match my level of appreciation…) with a final recognition of another valuable message that came through to me loud and clear — from President Clinton, during his extended remarks. His charge to the students to resist the temptation of focusing on our achievements, but instead to pay close attention to the divides in this world: from those of great fortune, to those of much less… from those benefiting from outstanding education, to those receiving spare resources… from those enjoying great health and substantial nourishment, to those living day by day…

By recognizing these divides, we take the first step towards making a better world.

Thank you again for my inclusion in this wonderful event.

Sincerely,

Karsten DaPonte


Karsten DaPonte graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1997. A Naval Reserve lieutenant commander, he was recalled to active duty in October 2005 and sent to Afghanistan, where he helped advise and train the Afghan National Army. He recently completed a master's degree with a concentration in strategic studies at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University. While completing his studies at SAIS, Mr. DaPonte worked in the State Department's Office of European Security and Political Affairs.

Leslie A. Boozer

Leslie A. Boozer

Zuckerman Fellow, Graduate School of Education, Harvard University

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I am writing to express my sincere gratitude for providing me with the opportunity to attend the 2007 International Achievement Summit in Washington, D.C. While I have been blessed to attend several amazing conferences over the years, this week will truly be remembered as the most inspiring and incredible learning experience of my life. I will forever be grateful to you, your husband Wayne, and the terrific staff for coordinating such a well-organized and intellectually stimulating event.

As you mentioned during your opening remarks, one of the primary purposes of the Academy of Achievement is to inspire us. After listening to the words of some of the most influential and distinguished leaders of our time, it would have been impossible to not be motivated. This diverse group of people, from President Bill Clinton to acclaimed author Toni Morrison, encouraged us to dream, to explore, and to reach beyond our comfort zone to achieve great things in our lifetime.

While working as an urban educator, I have learned that one of the best ways to encourage young people to achieve is to lead by example. I was delighted by the large number of achievers who stressed the importance of education in reaching their success, as well as their desire to improve the education of our country’s youth. From learning about Andre Agassi’s award-winning K-12 school in Las Vegas to discussing the efforts of the Milken schools with Michael Milken, I was inspired by so many of the achievers’ dedication to improving the lives of our most disadvantaged youth. Following their talks, many of the student delegates inquired about our public education system and how educational leaders are working to improve our schools. By highlighting this dilemma, I am hopeful for a cross-discipline solution in the future.

What was particularly remarkable about this year’s Summit was the collection of students from all over the world. Not only was I privileged to hear firsthand of the sacrifice and hardship endured by two of my heroes — Elie Wiesel and Archbishop Desmond Tutu — but I also was privileged to meet and learn from my roommate, Arezo Kohistani from Afghanistan. Hearing her struggle to improve policy and achieve peace in her country was equally inspiring.

In all, the Summit can only be described as overwhelming. Thank you again for bringing all of us together to this amazing event. I sincerely hope the Academy of Achievement’s annual International Achievement Summit will continue for generations to come so that many other achievers and students will be afforded the opportunity to learn from each other.

With deepest gratitude,

Leslie A. Boozer


Leslie Boozer earned her law degree at the University of Cincinnati College of Law and was honored with the National Association of Women Lawyers Award. After practicing business and labor law for several years, she made a career transition from law to education. She began her second career teaching at a public high school in South Central Los Angeles. While teaching, she served as a reform facilitator and worked with her colleagues to improve literacy instruction. She is now pursuing a Ph.D. in education at Harvard University. Her research and professional interests center on improving the educational experiences of children in urban school districts and increasing access to higher education.

Brian Capell

Brian Capell

Francis Collins Scholar, New York University School of Medicine

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I would like to extend my most sincere thanks and gratitude to you for allowing me the opportunity to attend the 2007 Summit of the International Academy of Achievement. It is hard to put into words what a rich and moving experience it was. Having lived in D.C. for the last three years, and having to move back to New York at the end of this summer, I felt very privileged to experience such phenomenal moments in the Capitol, the Supreme Court, the Senate and House, the National Archives, the State Department, etc. It definitely was the ultimate capstone to my time here. Below I would like to touch on a few of the most important moments of the Summit for me.

Beginning the very first night, to file past the Vietnam Memorial, sit before the Lincoln Memorial, and hear General Wesley Clark’s perspective on the lessons he has learned and how he would have handled both Vietnam and Iraq differently, was extremely illuminating and reaffirmed many of my own beliefs of what the role of the U.S. should be in this world as well as what a tremendous difference individual leaders can make, both for better and for worse.

The following day at the National Archives, I took very seriously David Rubenstein’s message of being persistent, finding one’s niche where they can make the greatest difference, and most importantly, being absolutely resolute to not settle or coast on one’s early successes. Rather, we must always push ourselves to be better and to keep achieving, lest others will pass us by and we will miss the opportunity to truly change the world in a more meaningful way.

As a future physician-scientist, it was an incredible thrill that evening to speak informally with both Craig Mello and Brian Druker. Beyond just the opportunity to see how down-to-earth both were, to discover how both were so driven by an urge to go above and beyond their already phenomenal scientific accomplishments in order to try and do something for the world’s larger problems made me realize that one must think bigger and not limit oneself. It was very gratifying to see that despite such success their true motivation remained the fundamental urge to help others, precisely why I always wanted to go into medicine.

The sensory overload continued during the session at the State Department where Dana Priest, in her uncovering the atrocious conditions of care at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, embodied the ability of an individual to enact major change at even the highest levels of government. Nothing that day, however, could compare to the words of Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Weaving together humor and his own experiences, Archbishop Tutu presented fascinating cases of how young people throughout the world have been the instruments of major change throughout history. From the end of Vietnam to the end of Apartheid, the Archbishop left no doubt that it is people just like us, his audience, that are needed to bring change and solutions to the great issues and injustices in our world today. His vision of “black and white and yellow” and “Bush and bin Laden” together in harmony, along with his final exhortation of “Help me. You are all I have,” brought tears to my eyes.

Not surprisingly though, for me the most electrifying moments of the conference came in the words of our former President, Bill Clinton. Displaying an astounding command of detail on a seemingly unlimited number of issues along with an unparalleled ability to connect with and bring his message home to the audience, Clinton left me profoundly inspired to take on “your greatest challenge” to “not become too focused on your own comfort” and to devote myself to serving humanity.

After all, as President Clinton and Dr. Francis Collins remind us, the Human Genome Project has shown that all of us humans are 99.9 percent the same at the DNA level.

Rather than focusing on that 0.1 percent that separates us, a focus “that leads to most of the world’s major problems,” we must focus on “our common humanity.”

Whether through science, medicine, or some other means, it is this common humanity that I seek to serve and improve. The Academy of Achievement has taught me more than anything that it is vital to not become too comfortable with ourselves. We must always strive to think beyond ourselves and use the gifts and opportunities we have been given for the betterment of humanity.

Thank you, Mrs. Reynolds, for this gift of inspiration.

With deepest appreciation,

Brian Capell


While enrolled in the joint M.D. and Ph.D. program at New York University, Brian Capell was awarded a Howard Hughes Medical Institute-NIH Research Scholarship. His current work involves the most dramatic form of premature aging, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, and its potential links to normal aging. His research has appeared in Nature Reviews Genetics and Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. A magna cum laude graduate of Boston College, he has received support awards from the Hughes Institute and the American Society of Human Genetics. He hopes to pursue a career combining research and craniofacial plastic surgery, focusing on pediatric conditions such as cleft lip and palate.

Graves Tompkins

Graves Tompkins

Harvard Business School and John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I cannot thank you enough for hosting and including me in this year’s International Achievement Summit. It was an incredibly inspiring — and humbling — experience and it truly changed my life. Ever since our closing panel, I have been reflecting upon the defining moments, unforgettable experiences, and lasting friendships from our week in Washington, for which I will always feel fortunate and forever grateful. My transformational time with the Academy also yielded a series of profound personal and professional conclusions, some of which I would like to share with you.

Growing up in Alexandria, Virginia, I was enthralled with politics, government and public service, and I carried this passion with me to Princeton. In college, I developed a love for international affairs and wrote my senior thesis about HIV/AIDS in South Africa. From there, I moved to New York, where I worked as a private equity analyst at Goldman, Sachs & Co. I thoroughly enjoyed my job, but I found myself constantly worn down, gradually ensnared in the trappings of New York, and increasingly worried that my passion for service was becoming faint and frustrated. After three years in New York, I left for Harvard to pursue a concurrent degree at Harvard Business School and the Kennedy School of Government, hoping to find ways to integrate my interest in investing and my desire to make a positive difference in society.

In this regard, the Summit and its mission perfectly embodied what I was seeking from my graduate school experience: my youthful passion was reawakened, my sense of purpose ignited and my aspirations emboldened. Over the course of four days, I was struck by several consistent themes on leadership, values I now seek to embrace in my own life: we have potential to achieve great things but relentless work and sacrifice are required — we cannot coast, fall in love with our gifts or take them for granted; leadership is grounded in hope and optimism but these anchors can be undermined by arrogance and ego; success is an inherently selfless act — it is about others more than it is about ourselves — it requires that we are serious but do not take ourselves too seriously; the duty of leadership is sacred but also calls for compassion — combining the words of Elie Wiesel, “The worst sin in life is to be a spectator,” and to lead, we must “Think higher and feel deeper.”

Along with these invaluable lessons about life and leadership came countless memories: witnessing the vision of President Clinton, the hope of Archbishop Tutu and the hardship of Congressman Lewis; discussing the war in Kosovo, the vexing challenges in the Middle East, and the decision to run for President with General Wesley Clark; participating in engaging conversations with authors, artists, businessmen, and politicians over meals and every night at the after-hours reception; demystifying personal glimpses revealing that within great leaders of extraordinary talent, determination and courage, real human beings can be found. This is, of course, not to mention fellow student delegates, exceptional individuals in their own right who became close friends in a matter of days and with whom I frequently stay in touch (we, the 2007 Class of the Academy of Achievement, even have our own Facebook website!).

On Friday afternoon, I went running along Pennsylvania Avenue before the Banquet of the Golden Plate. As what transpired in just a few short days began to sink in, I realized that although its significance would not likely present itself until weeks or even years later, the Summit had already given new meaning to my personal and professional journey. My past and future brought me to the Summit — where I have been and where I hope to go — and the Summit has inspired me to serve and contribute today, not twenty years from now. The call to do well and good is more resounding than ever; I plan to pursue my passions in business and public affairs with newfound energy and dedication and speak out whenever I can to help those in need or without a voice. No sooner did I come to these resolutions than I was asked to speak at the concluding panel, where I had the honor of sharing my reflections about the Summit, representing my peers, and even answering a question from Chris Matthews about leadership!

Thank you again for providing me and so many others with such an extraordinary opportunity. Your generosity and commitment to developing and encouraging young leaders continues to change lives of people who aspire to change the world. Just as I have rediscovered my passion and renewed my commitment to serve the greater good, each of us who attended will always be inspired by the Summit and carry with us what we learned from great leaders — and about ourselves — during our unforgettable week in Washington. I hope you have a wonderful summer and I look forward to seeing you and Mr. Reynolds in the coming year at the Kennedy School.

With best wishes and deep gratitude,

Graves Tompkins


Graves Tompkins graduated from Princeton University with a bachelor's degree in politics and a concentration in international relations. While at Princeton, he co-authored a report for the United Nations Security Council on "Emerging Threats to Global Diplomacy." After graduation, he worked for the Merchant Banking Division of Goldman, Sachs & Co., identifying and executing private equity investments. He also founded and led the New York chapter of Room to Read, a social enterprise that builds schools, endows libraries and funds girls' scholarships in developing countries. He is now pursuing concurrent degrees at Harvard Business School and the John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Kobina Aidoo

Kobina Aidoo

John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

When I look for commonalities among Ian Frazer, Desmond Tutu and George Lucas it becomes clear to me that achievement is to a great extent about touching the lives of others, and you have touched mine in ways that you or even I may not know yet. Please allow me to share a couple that I do know now.

This extraordinary experience has catalyzed a major shift in the way I seek to touch lives. As I mentioned on the student panel, and it is worth repeating, listening to the “secrets of success” has precipitated the end of talent as the driver for my success. Like most other student delegates, my achievements so far have been shaped to a great extent by my ability to add numbers or define words.

Words like “smart” have been used to describe and, too many times, define me. As I grow — and particularly through this Summit — I learn that talent alone does not an achiever make.

I ask myself if I’ve peaked too early or I’m just getting warmed up. David Rubenstein’s words were a wakeup call for me to find that extra oomph to go to the next level, for talent to take a backseat and become one tool among many in making things happen. There is no shortage of books or speeches on leadership or achievement but it bears repeating, if only to drive home the point. But what really made the Academy special in that regard was to have the sheer breadth of journeys and fields of endeavor, and to get to interact with these national treasures long enough to get over being star-struck and get some depth or, at the very least, nuggets of inspiration and insight. For that, I am forever grateful.

I seek to touch the world through media, and the Summit gave me a timely impetus to pursue that passion. Last January, I had an idea to aid Africa’s development through media, and I decided to pursue it after graduation rather than follow a path that would make it much easier to pay off my debt. Mine is a risky path, but it’s a burning compulsion, so when Toni Morrison spoke of the “compulsion” that drove her to write, I found myself going “mm hmm, I hear you.” I was further inspired by Peyton Manning’s words that once you make such a decision you can’t look back. Thank you, I needed to hear that.

Above all, thank you for your sheer grace and generosity. They say we are all connected but it took your vision and generosity to touch my life, me a boy from Ghana, and put me in touch with these achievers and my fellow student delegates, all amazing and interesting people. You evidently left no stone unturned or any detail unattended in making us feel comfortable and appreciated, and making this one of the most profound experiences of my life.

Someone asked the student panel how the student delegates planned to stay in touch and I said “Facebook.” Within 24 hours after the Summit we had a fast-growing Facebook group. We hope it will be an avenue for us to stay in touch with one another as we venture on our unique journeys to touch the lives of others as you have touched ours in unique ways.

The depth of my gratitude can best be expressed in my native Akan, so Mrs. Reynolds, Medaase pa paa pa!

Sincerely,

Kobina Aidoo


Before coming to the United States, Kobina Aidoo was instrumental in launching Ghana's first private television service. After graduation from Barry University in Miami, Florida, he worked as a new media producer for Warner Bros. Publications in Miami. At the same time, he volunteered at Intel Computer Clubhouse, an after-school program aimed at building technology skills among underserved youth. This spring, he received a master of public policy degree with a concentration in international trade and finance from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, where he was Co-Chief Editor of the Africa Policy Journal.

Sara Keenan

Sara Keenan

Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellow for Social Entrepreneurship, Steinhardt School of Education, New York University

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

What a gift you have given! I have left the Academy of Achievement Summit with incredible memories and future opportunities. In my attempts to describe the Summit to friends and family, I have felt most successful when I stopped trying to describe the whole, but instead shared a few experiences. So let me share several moments from my week to illustrate my gratitude.

Our visit the first night to the Supreme Court stands out. Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Ginsburg and Kennedy shared stories, humor, and analysis informally. The room was electric with attention as Justice Ginsburg spoke with such quiet and powerful authority.

When Barack Obama spoke, he described his own journey and how his entrance into civic life was linked to another member of the Academy, Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Obama’s reflection on his own moment of obligation as a young college student to organize against apartheid in South Africa was a powerful reminder of the many choices and steps that a person takes before they become a well-respected leader.

I loved hearing Barack Obama praise his hero, while Archbishop Tutu sat in the first row, and we all sat transfixed.

For the last three years, I was a middle school English teacher in Chicago; I had a lot to talk about with Mayor Daley. I had the opportunity to have three conversations over the week with him and his wife at the Summit. We did not just shake hands or congratulate each other; we discussed specific issues like how to extend the school day in Chicago and how to improve the district’s recruitment of teachers. I hadn’t expected the Mayor to be so approachable or to be so interested in my perspective on the Chicago public schools, which, I suppose, is the point of the Summit. Through real dialogue, we realize that leaders, who have achieved so much in their fields, are human and approachable.

The moments between the speeches were inspiring also. I connected with numerous people in the education field, like David, the education advisor for Ted Kennedy, and Brie, a Reynolds Fellow at Harvard, but I also loved having the opportunity to talk with people so unlike me in their studies and background.

I love how unplanned themes ran through the Summit, threads that connected the advice and values of the different speakers. General Pace talked about the importance of intellectual courage, about the courage to speak when you may disagree with those in the room around you. Justice Ginsburg similarly talked about such courage, about not “calling for the home team.” Another theme was the importance of taking risks and pushing oneself, from David Rubenstein challenging the student delegates to perform as well in the second ”third” of their lives to Suzan-Lori Parks instructing us to “entertain our ideas.”

I left the Summit with a call to reexamine my own plans and work, to broaden the view of my life and of my possibilities, and to hold my work in education to a higher standard. I’m still thinking about my conversations with the Mayor and Maggie Daley and how valuable our exchange was. We need more channels for this kind of real exchange of ideas between leaders in a field and the frontline. Perhaps I can be the innovator to create these channels between teachers and district leaders. This past week Mayor Daley’s office has called to schedule a visit.

Thank you, Mrs. Reynolds, for opening these doors.

Sara Keenan


After graduating from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, Sara Keenan taught high school and middle school English for five years. While teaching in the Chicago public schools, she was awarded grants from Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education to teach video production to her students. This was the beginning of a long-term project to make media education a part of every child's curriculum. She is now a Catherine B. Reynolds Fellow in Social Entrepreneurship, earning a master's degree in media, culture, and communication at New York University. She hopes to participate in the transformation of education to reflect the realities of the digital age.

Alice Poole

Alice Poole

Georgetown Public Policy Institute, Georgetown University and l'École des Hautes Études Commerciales, University of Geneva

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

Thank you very much for hosting such a fascinating Summit; I was honored to be the first student attending it from Georgetown’s Public Policy Institute.

The most insistent message of the conference was to reiterate the power of the individual in shaping change. In my home country, Great Britain, any similar event held would be far more muted about individual power. Studying in the U.S. has allowed me to benefit from this difference in culture. That said, your foundation’s “bet on the individual” to make a difference — albeit in a multitude of fields — laid out a strong challenge to attending students as the quid pro quo for such wonderful stimulation and hospitality.

In thinking about my own role in the future, I realized afresh that one of my strengths is in seeing and managing inter-linkages between the normally “siloed” issues and solutions: that environmental sustainability can link into job creation; that preventing and managing disasters cuts across health, education and economic development and so on. In the short-term then, I will continue to explore multiple issues in more depth. For example, I want to organize an event for Sylvia Earle to address public policy students about the absence of the oceans in the environmental debate; to continue talking to Dr. Susan Blumenthal about the best policy planning for disaster management; and to Richard Leakey about combating corruption in Africa, as well as to my fellow students. I trust that these discussions will shape my career after I graduate in December.

Another profound message was that the mantle of leadership should be accompanied by both humility and courage. It was moving to see many examples of this, such as Dr. Benjamin Carson’s struggle to be a black neurosurgeon, and how he and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar are aiming to rewrite history to include black people’s substantial contributions.

Although the depiction of challenges to address both now and in future generations was daunting — and the post-conference occurrence of freak storms in my temperate birthplace, Sheffield, only heightened the reality of global warming — I left uplifted and excited. We do indeed have so many of the technical solutions to make a difference. We just need the will to make those differences at individual, community, societal and global levels.

Finally, it was inspiring emotionally and stimulating intellectually to hear an eclectic range of speakers. Especially memorable was listening to Desmond Tutu and Bill Clinton as they delivered passionate, articulate and witty speeches. Where else would I have heard an Archbishop mimic God talking to the Virgin Mary on the phone, whilst retaining respect and love for a living, spiritual faith?

Thank you, Wayne Reynolds, and all the organizers for such a successful event. Elie Wiesel concluded his poignant speech by encouraging us to “think higher and feel deeper.” Not a bad maxim to live by.

Yours sincerely,

Alice Poole


At the University of Birmingham, England, Alice Poole was elected to represent 20,000 students as President of the Guild of Students. Since graduation, she has traveled throughout Southeast Asia, and has volunteered with international development projects in Namibia. She worked as a management consultant in London for five years, managing a multi-million-pound criminal justice reform project. She is now studying for a master's in public policy at Georgetown University, and an MBA in international organizations at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, where she actively volunteers with the human rights advocacy group International Bridges to Justice.

Meenakashi Gupta

Meenakashi Gupta

Soros Fellow, Harvard Medical School

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

A simple thank you seems inadequate for the experience of attending the 2007 International Achievement Summit in Washington, D.C. I truly enjoyed meeting the individuals gathered at the Summit. I learned so much from the speakers’ and delegates’ stories. I want to share with you a few of these memorable experiences.

One common theme that many of the distinguished honorees spoke of was the importance of not allowing failure or the fear of failure to discourage one from achieving one’s goals. Nobel Laureate Dr. Mather’s ideas for his device to assess the Big Bang came from his “failed” graduate thesis project. Dr. Druker spoke of how the test compounds for the cancer therapy, Gleevec, originally failed. However, careful analysis demonstrated that one of the control compounds was a success! Though we have all heard the childhood saying, “Try and try and you will succeed one day,” having the opportunity to hear some of the admired leaders and heroes of our society speak of their experiences of failure and success made this adage more believable.

I had the opportunity to have lunch with Dr. Carson. He spoke of the continual discouragement that he received from his colleagues about continuing his service to the community while an attending physician. In their eyes, time should only be spent on academic endeavors as only these would lead to academic promotion. He did not let their words dissuade him. He successfully maintained his community involvement, while achieving academic promotion. This importance of service he spoke of was echoed by many of the honorees and distinguished guests. Their words not only supported the possibility of combining service with one’s profession, but showed that this is crucial given the numerous problems that we face as a global community. This experience reminded me that though I will soon become a physician, above all I will always be a citizen of the world.

I will never forget Professor Wiesel’s and Archbishop Tutu’s brilliant speeches. It is amazing that individuals who have experienced great horrors in their lives have such an amazing capacity for forgiveness and hope.

I only wish that there had been enough time to meet all of the amazing individuals that you gathered in D.C. for the conference. It is comforting to know that there are so many wonderful people poised and eager to make changes in our world.

Thank you for this wonderful gift. Your vision and dedication are inspirational.

Sincerely,

Meenakashi Gupta


Now an M.D. candidate at Harvard Medical School, Meenakashi Gupta received her bachelor's degree in biology, magna cum laude, from Harvard University. While an undergraduate, she developed the Voices Enrichment Program, a youth empowerment program that fosters civic engagement in children. Ms. Gupta has been interested in neuroscience since high school and has published numerous articles in the field. Most recently, she has been investigating the treatment of spinal cord injury with neural stem cells. As an Albert Schweitzer Fellow, she founded Chef It Up! to combat and prevent obesity among inner-city youth. She looks forward to a career as a physician scientist.

Khalid Fakhro

Khalid Fakhro

Crown Prince International Scholar and Howard Hughes Scholar, Yale University

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

It is with the deepest sense of gratitude that I find myself writing you. Although a busy month has passed since returning from the 2007 International Achievement Summit, I still find myself stupefied every time I think back at what must have been the most compelling four days of my life. What an experience it was! I feel humbled, enchanted, and most of all, exposed.

Dr. Ronald Koller, having accompanied H. H. the Crown Prince Shaikh Salman bin Hamad Al-Khalifa to last year’s International Achievement Summit, attempted to explain to me what he experienced at the 2006 Summit and what my expectations should be. Clearly, he left a very high impression in my mind, and I thought that it would be nearly impossible to live up to the standard set by that conference. Fortunately, I was wrong, I had misjudged, and I am nearly at a loss of words in trying to explain how lucky I was to have attended the 2007 Summit.

As I walked into the Supreme Court chambers on the first night, I started to understand the reputation which the Summit already enjoys. I could not fathom being in the presence of Chief Justice Roberts, and Justices Kennedy and Ginsburg — three of the wisest, most revered human beings in the world. That same night at the war memorial, I saw one of the most beautiful sites under the D. C. moonlight. It was almost surreal listening to individuals we have learned to respect and admire for their contributions to American politics and their sacrifices in combat. I was particularly inspired by General Wesley Clark who, even as the late hours of the night crept up, would keep his audience engaged in a heated discussion on pragmatic diplomacy and the future of American policy in the Middle East, a region that is clearly close to my heart.

As an aspiring geneticist, nothing came closer to satisfying my passion than the company of fellow scientists at the NIH. I was fortunate to meet Dr. Elias Zerhouni and learn about his inspiring journey from humble beginnings to Director of the NIH. I also had the incredible opportunity of meeting one of my personal heroes, Dr. Francis Collins, whose steadfast commitment has kept the human genome publicly accessible, thereby propelling the rate of discovery in human genetics. Additionally, I have always been heavily interested in understanding the mechanism and evolution of RNAi, and no words can describe the satisfaction of being able to chat at length with Nobel Laureate Dr. Craig Mello on his discovery, as well as the general future of scientific research.

Suffice it to say that the Summit was by far the best experience of my life. Growing up in Bahrain, the very first Grand Slam title I watched was Wimbledon ’92, and one of the first books that really made me fall in love with English literature was The Bluest Eye. There I was, standing in the presence of Andre Agassi and Toni Morrison, unable to juggle the lexicon to express to them the extent to which their achievements had impacted me. They and other past and present honorees continuously educated and inspired me; indeed, even though I had never met them before, they had influenced my life and molded the way I think and act today in ways they would have never imagined possible. I never thought I’d ever come close to seeing them eye-to-eye, and there I was, having a conversation of a lifetime.

In conclusion, when people ask me about the Summit, I find it incredibly difficult to verbalize my feelings during those four days. Sure, the words Clinton, Bush, Daley, Pelosi, Obama, Milken, Wiesel, Manning, Abdul-Jabbar, Ephron, Suzan-Lori Parks, Lucas, Swank, Priest, Carson, Mather, Rosenberg and the most Reverend Desmond Tutu can tell a compelling story. But those are people who have achieved; they have given their all towards their dreams and have set many standards for years to come. However, the real inspiration — the part of the story that I find almost impossible to explain — came from my fellow delegates. The value of their company can never be quantified; what I learned from them will forever stay with me. After meeting them, I learned that the globe’s fortunes were changing, for there are many visionary leaders who now have a renewed determination to weather the challenges ahead with a sense of purpose and collaboration, in order to achieve the unified goal of making this world a much better place for every one of its inhabitants.

Mrs. Reynolds, your philanthropic vision is truly unique and honorable. You can rest assured that my fellow delegates and I will forever be in your debt for this magnificent opportunity. I am honored, humbled, and truly grateful. Thank you so much for investing in me, for believing in me, and for inspiring me; I will never forget your kindness.

Warmest regards,

Khalid Fakhro


Born and raised in Bahrain, Khalid Fakhro was awarded the prestigious Crown Prince Scholarship for study abroad. At the University of Chicago, he pursued his interest in human hereditary disease, graduating with honors in cell biology and molecular genetics. He is now earning a Ph.D. in human genetics at Yale University. As a Howard Hughes Medical Research Scholar, his work is focused on finding genes responsible for congenital cardiovascular and renal disorders. When he completes his studies, he hopes to return to Bahrain to participate in the biotechnology revolution and encourage biomedical research in his native region.

Alice Michelle Augustine

Alice Michelle Augustine

Soros Fellow, Loyola Law School

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I was born in Dominica, a small island in the Caribbean, and my family and I moved to the United States in 1998. As a child, I had an overactive imagination and spent many days and nights conjuring images of the major events of my life. My dreams however could not put together the event that the 2007 International Achievement Summit was. I am so grateful for your initiative and generosity in bringing together some of the world’s most amazing people. The 2007 International Achievement Summit was indeed one of the major events of my life.

The leaders were wonderful. I never thought that I would stand in the same room as Archbishop Desmond Tutu or Dr. Mello. However, my greatest joy was my fellow delegates. I was so impressed by the lives and work of the delegates that I had to whole-heartedly agree with Archbishop Tutu when he said that too often people ignore the good deeds of the majority of the young, and focus on the minority who engage in negative activities.

I thank you for restoring my hope in the next generation of leaders. I thank you for allowing me to expand my professional network by introducing me to hundreds of people who share my interests.

But even more so, I thank you for helping me find among the delegates, people who are now my forever friends.

Audre Lorde — poet, feminist, mother — said that we must be the change we wish to see in the world. The Academy of Achievement helped me meet people who are already the change they want to see in the world. The Academy has taken me one step closer to my own contribution to a better world. I now see that it is possible to write a great novel, even if it takes six years. I know that I am not alone in my struggle to see that mothers have the capacity to educate, house and feed their children. I now know that there are people doing what I want to do and succeeding because they were not afraid to take the shot, as Andre Agassi reminded us during his talk.

Thank you for your generosity in sponsoring this event. Thank you for bringing this wonderful group of people together, but most of all, thank you for inspiring me to “take a shot” at my dreams.

Sincerely,

Alice Michelle Augustine


In her first year at Lehman College of the City University of New York (CUNY), Alice Michelle Augustine worked over 68 hours a week to support her family while remaining a full-time student. As a Watson Fellow, she worked at the New York State Supreme Court, the New York City Council, and the Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice in Accra, Ghana. In 2006, she graduated Phi Beta Kappa and summa cum laude. She is now studying at Loyola University College of Law in New Orleans, where she is a co-founder of the Career Development Clinic, which provides career and academic counseling to young women in the juvenile justice system in New Orleans.

William Garard Godwin

William Garard Godwin

Truman Scholar, Georgetown University

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I write to thank you for making an investment in my life and career by hosting what was undeniably a spectacular 2007 International Achievement Summit in our nation’s capital. Having spent four years at Georgetown University, I was admittedly hoping that this year’s event would be in a different city, perhaps one I hadn’t visited! Nevertheless, during the week I was exposed to people and places throughout Washington, D.C. that I would never have been able to access on my own. Moreover, getting to know similarly motivated students from the U.S. and abroad has helped broaden my network of associates with whom I share a variety of goals.

After taking a few weeks to reflect on my time at the Summit, I remain in awe of the grand opportunity that was offered to me — the son and grandson of African American sharecroppers from Tennessee. For me, the Summit was a pleasantly overwhelming opportunity that placed me at the feet of dozens of leaders in diverse fields from a wide array of backgrounds. I found Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Dr. Elie Wiesel, and Dr. Ben Carson to be some of the most inspiring speakers of the hundreds of similar caliber leaders we met. All of these persons helped further instill in me the importance of achievement: setting goals, following through, selfless sacrifice, integrity, and always leading! It was truly an honor to be part of this group, and as the purpose was to inspire: I stand to report that I was no doubt inspired, encouraged, and empowered to be a change agent who thinks globally and multi-facetedly to solve some of the world’s most trying problems.

With interest in the intersection of law, religion, and politics in American life to spur economic development and political consciousness in impoverished communities, over the next five years I will pursue graduate education at the University of Chicago Law School and Harvard Divinity School. I will begin this fall with the first year of law school at Chicago. I am very much looking forward to the move there as I foresee building a career in Chicago that encompasses public ministry, law, and elected public office. I certainly plan to keep you abreast of how things are going. Because of individuals like yourself, I am better, our country is better, and our world is refreshed with a spirit to serve and to better the human race.

With highest appreciation,

William Garard Godwin


An ordained Methodist minister with interests in education and public service, William Garard Godwin received his bachelor's degree in sociology from Georgetown University in 2007. He spent his junior year at the London School of Economics, writing a dissertation on African American intellectual history. While at Georgetown, he interned with U.S. Senator Bill Frist, from his home state of Tennessee, and with U.S. Representative Jesse Jackson, Jr. In Autumn 2008, he will pursue a dual-degree program at the University of Chicago Law School and Harvard Divinity School.

Patrick Hovakimian

Patrick Hovakimian

Marshall Scholar, Trinity College, Oxford University

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I write this letter having completed a month of traveling following the 46th annual International Achievement Summit in Washington, DC. Among many other positive aspects, taking a break from graduate studies and traveling provides time for reflection and introspection. With the time for genuine reflection, moreover, the inspiring experiences of this year’s Summit have only increased in significance. I thank you for sponsoring my attendance at the Summit — a truly amazing gift.

One of the most challenging aspects of talking about the Summit to those who have not attended is describing what exactly it is and what happens at it. I have watched many friends, colleagues and relatives listen wide-eyed and open-jawed as I ran through the achievers and leaders who graciously took the time to meet and converse with the student delegates. After all, how is it possible to adequately describe having dinner with Supreme Court Justices one evening and then debating Chris Matthews over drinks the following night? Or dancing to the Brooks & Dunn songs I used to listen to in the car alongside Senators, the Mayor of Chicago, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff?

But as I attempted to describe the Summit and the activities in which we were so fortunate to partake, I could not help but feel as though I was failing to capture the essence of what really transpired. The Summit was so much more than an opportunity to meet and be inspired by high achievers — it was a reaffirmation of the importance of capitalizing potential to meet the challenges of the world. Bill Clinton captured this idea in his talk when he reminded us that the greatest danger to the progress of humankind is for leaders and achievers to “not fall deeply enough in love with their talents.”

“Fear of failure,” said President Clinton, “will rob the world of your potential.”

He touched upon a notion that, I believe, strikes at the core of the Summit’s purpose and in the meantime offered student delegates an unforgettable personal experience. Remarkable, yes, but also par for the course at the Summit.

I also must thank you for the opportunity to meet my fellow student delegates, a group of talented and accomplished individuals of which I am proud to be a part. Over the course of the Summit, we discussed everything from politics to science to sports, and I am happy to say that I built new friendships, rekindled old ones, and generally enjoyed every moment from the bleary-eyed breakfasts at the Hay-Adams to the adrenaline-fueled receptions late into the evening. The Summit brought together a very special group of graduate students and once again I thank you for giving me the chance to count myself among them.

The 2007 International Achievement Summit occurred at a significant time in my life. I have recently completed my final examinations at the University of Oxford, where I studied as a Marshall Scholar for a Master’s degree in Political Theory. Currently, I am preparing to begin Stanford Law School in the fall. There are many academic, personal and professional choices that I have recently made and will be making in the near future. The Summit was exceptionally useful in helping not only to influence what those decisions will ultimately be, but also my thought process and decision-making process. I am happy to say that my commitment to a career in public service was reinforced by my experience at the Summit, as was my desire to join the ranks of those public servants who seek to harness and capitalize upon potential to meet the challenges of the world. More than once, we were reminded by Summit honorees of the adage, “To whom much is given, much shall be required.” The Summit presented me with the opportunity to reaffirm my own commitment to public service — I am thankful for the occasion.

Again, thank you for the chance to listen, learn, grow, and be inspired. I cannot fully express my gratitude for this terrific opportunity. It was wonderful meeting and thanking you and Mr. Reynolds in person at the Summit. I am humbled by the experience and look forward to continuing a relationship with the Foundation over the years. Thank you, Mrs. Reynolds, for this extraordinary gift.

Sincerely,

Patrick Hovakimian


Patrick Hovakimian graduated summa cum laude from Occidental College in Los Angeles, earning a bachelor's degree in politics. As a Truman Scholar, he worked with the U.S. Department of Justice Community Relations Service, assisting communities to overcome inter-ethnic conflicts. He recently worked with the Republican National Committee, and with Senator John McCain's communications team, examining the impact of the Internet on the political process. He is now reading for a Ph.D. in political theory as a Marshall Scholar at Oxford. He will enter Stanford Law School in the fall of 2008; he plans to apply his legal education to a career in public service.

Phillip J. Gray, Jr.

Phillip J. Gray, Jr.

Howard Hughes Fellow, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

As I write this letter, I find myself at a loss for words, as nothing I could write here would adequately express my thanks for providing this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to attend the 46th annual International Achievement Summit. Having spoken with a student delegate from a previous year, I knew I was in for an amazing week, but my experiences far exceeded my expectations.

Though I have visited Washington, D.C. numerous times, I was amazed by the special access we had to so many historic facilities, and more importantly, to the amazing people who work within them. Being able to sit just feet from such people as the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Senate Majority Leader, Speaker of the House and former President Clinton was an experience unlike any other. Furthermore, so many of these amazing people were willing to take further time out to mingle with the students and answer our questions.

As a future physician, I was especially excited to meet some of our nation’s most influential physicians and researchers. I had extensive conversations with NIH director Elias Zerhouni about the state of NIH-funded research and with Francis Collins about the interface of religion and science. I also met numerous other individuals in the medical profession who were able to give me great insight into my future career.

Perhaps the most memorable experience of my week was having the chance to speak with Michael Milken. Immediately upon hearing that I had just completed a research project on prostate cancer, Mr. Milken passed my contact information on to his contacts at the Prostate Cancer Foundation. The next day, as I was waiting for my flight back to Boston, I received a call from Jonathan Simons, President of the Prostate Cancer Foundation and the former mentor of my current mentor at Johns Hopkins. We have already set up a meeting in a few months to discuss how we can work together to fight this ever more prevalent disease.

Out of all the amazing experiences, what amazed me most about the Summit were my fellow delegates. To see so many amazing people from all walks of life made my training and work seem so insignificant by comparison. Even so, I feel totally energized and hope to steer my future career in such a way that I too can have as much impact on the world as all the people I met during this incredible week.

Thank you so much for making all of this possible. I know I speak for all of the student delegates when I say that you have changed the lives of each of us by giving us this unmatched opportunity.

Sincerely,

Phillip J. Gray, Jr.


Phillip J. Gray, Jr. graduated from the University of Arizona, summa cum laude, in 2004, with a bachelor's degree in biochemistry and molecular biophysics as well as molecular and cellular biology. As an undergraduate, he studied in China and Taiwan for two years, where he gained fluency in Mandarin. After graduation, he joined the M.D. program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. As a Howard Hughes Fellow, he has spent the last year investigating prostate cancer at Harvard Medical School. The author of numerous original research articles, he recently guest-edited an issue of the journal Seminars in Oncology. He looks forward to a career as a physician-scientist in the field of radiation oncology.

Anna H. Chodos

Anna H. Chodos

Zuckerman Fellow, Harvard Medical School and School of Public Health, Harvard University

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I am writing to express my deepest thanks for your incredible generosity as my sponsor for the 2007 International Achievement Summit. Those four days were truly some of the most amazing and inspiring of my entire life. I am awed at the extent of your generosity in sponsoring people like myself to attend, and in putting so much work into making the Summit happen.

There was truly an astounding mix of talented graduate students, politicians, actors, teachers, social change agents, businesspeople, scientists, musicians, and journalists — to name a few!

First, being in the presence and company of some of the people I most admire was a humbling and exciting experience. As a medical student and a daughter of scientists, meeting Dr. Craig Mello, Dr. John Mather, Dr. Elias Zerhouni, Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, and Dr. Benjamin Carson was an experience I’ll never forget. Being able to speak with people who have forever changed our world and science for the better was incredible. I especially enjoyed speaking with Dr. Carson, who offered advice and wisdom based on his own work with regard to making social change in a community. I hope, too, to pursue community-based work, mostly around chronic disease and care for the elderly, and his passion inspired me. Only later, when speaking with my family about people I met at the Summit, did I learn that ten years ago Dr. Carson performed a critical life-extending operation on a family friend dying of AIDS. His work in that instance gave us irreplaceable extra time with a loved one, and I realized that perhaps these achievers had a bigger impact on me than I could possibly imagine.

Another wonderful thing about the achievers honored at this Summit was their tremendous words of inspiration and the focus of their talks. More than a few, such as Mr. David Rubenstein, Mr. Ralph Nader and Mr. A. Scott Berg, spent less time commending the students and themselves on achievements already made and spent more time focusing on the challenges for us in the future. Importantly, so many of the speakers emphasized the fact that meaningful achievement was not inevitable despite our progress thus far. It is a deliberate commitment to making the world a better place that is the beginning of a future that has some real impact.

No one drove this home better than Rev. Desmond Tutu, of course, and his words about tolerance and working to bring more justice in this world lifted all of us. As a man who has been through so much, has done so much for others, and who is so full of compassion and inspiration, it was a true honor just to be in his presence. I felt the weight of this challenge and hope I can, through active and daily commitment, one day make a true contribution to the world around me — in medicine, in health policy and in the lives of patients and their families.

Lastly, I would like to mention one speech that moved me to thought, among so many. While discussing the process of writing her first novel, Toni Morrison mentioned that she was writing The Bluest Eye for whom she considered the ideal reader, herself. That novel was written for her own enjoyment of working with and thinking about the characters. Many of the other speakers emphasized the importance of our focus on using our work for helping others, and Ms. Morrison’s reflections on her motivations for her work was an interesting addition. It made me reflect that we must measure our actions against our own sense of what to do and that perhaps our greatest contributions are those actions that are most representative of ourselves and our own values. I will remember forever the image of Ms. Morrison working every night for six years on a novel written for herself that when published became a novel owned, loved and a part of so many millions of readers, including me. What she gave was a part of herself to everyone.

Thank you again for this opportunity to attend the Summit, which has created a divide for me between before and after this experience. I do not know if I will ever again be in the company of so many accomplished leaders, but I will always cherish and try to live out actively the impact they have had on me. Your generosity and vision clearly know few boundaries, and I hope you appreciate the immense gratitude from every student delegate that attended, like myself.

Sincerely,

Anna H. Chodos


Following her graduation, summa cum laude, from Columbia University, Anna Chodos spent two years performing basic science research on Type 1 diabetes mellitus at the University of California, San Francisco. During that time, she also volunteered with hospice patients and at a free clinic for women. As a Zuckerman Fellow, she is entering her final year at Harvard Medical School and is also completing a master's degree at Harvard University's School of Public Health. She is particularly concerned with protecting the health of the vulnerable elderly in poor communities where economic development has altered traditional lifestyles, affecting the transmission of chronic diseases.

Khulood Ebrahim

Khulood Ebrahim

Crown Prince International Scholar, Emory University and École Supérieure de Gestion

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I would like to thank you deeply for the honor of being invited to the 2007 International Achievement Summit. I cannot begin to describe the privilege I felt to be among such a fine crowd of accomplished professionals and bright students. Even though it has been weeks since I got back, I still fail to explain the magnificence of this event to others. Any description of my experience would be an understatement, and for making me experience such an event, I truly and deeply thank you.

I am very grateful to have been able to represent my country, Bahrain, at the event. I am especially grateful to be an international scholar of His Highness Shaikh Salman Bin Hamad AI-Khalifa, because his care and encouragement have put me on the path I am leading today. I would not have been able to learn and grow, and thus become worthy of being part of the Summit’s elite group of graduate students. Needless to say, I felt happy to talk about my country to fellow student delegates in the Summit.

I was struck by the amount of diversity and the number of international students who flew from all corners of the world to take part in this event. I enjoyed getting to know many of them and exchanging ideas and plans about what we aspire to do in the future. My hope is to make those new friendships that were formed during the four-day conference into life-lasting ones. It will be both exciting and motivating to follow the progress of others, along with my own, and to see how far they’ve gone towards fulfilling their amazing dreams.

The multicultural flavor was also apparent in the choice of guest speakers and honorees, who enriched my experience even further with their wise words and the grace with which they received students’ questions. They were also very kind in making us, the student delegates, feel comfortable enough to approach them and converse with them. For instance, I particularly remember an extremely interesting conversation with Dr. John Horner, a paleontologist, about the mechanism of reconstructing dinosaurs and the prospect of bringing them to life, not only on the big screen as in Jurassic Park, but through modern genetic manipulation of certain existing species — a conversation I never imagined I would have had, if not for this Summit.

Despite the overwhelming number of speakers, I seem to have retained most of them in my memory, in an attempt to keep the experience alive after leaving the Summit. I especially remember Elie Wiesel talking about staying motivated and being persistent until one achieves one’s goals, and that one should learn from one’s mistakes and then forget about them before trying again. I also remember Andre Agassi talking about finding the strength to get over the upsets of his life, and being able to turn his success on the tennis court into a vessel to help underprivileged children in need of care and attention. President Clinton was inspiring in his talk about our responsibility today in dealing with the threat of global warming and protecting our planet.

In conclusion, I am thrilled to have been part of such an elite group of students. Everybody was unique in their own right. It was a life-altering experience to be recognized on such a global level. I left the Summit inspired to surpass the high expectations set for us and eager to make my positive contribution in this world. I would not have felt such a great motivation if it wasn’t for your generosity and kindness, so thank you, Mrs. Reynolds.

My most sincere regards,

Khulood Ebrahim


A recipient of Bahrain's prestigious Crown Prince International Scholarship for higher education, Khulood Ebrahim graduated from Emory University with high honors, majoring in both finance and psychology. At Emory, she served as President of the International Association, and of the 30th annual International Cultural Festival. She has had extensive international experience, living and studying on three different continents within the past six years. She is now studying at the Graduate School of Management (École Supérieure de Gestation or ESG) in Paris, France. She looks forward to a career in investment banking after completion of her MBA in 2008.

Joshua B. Kay

Joshua B. Kay

University of Michigan Law School

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

I am writing to express my gratitude for your generous sponsorship of my attendance at the 2007 International Achievement Summit in Washington, D.C. Since that time, work and family commitments have wholly consumed my time, delaying this note, but that may actually have been fortuitous, as it has given me several weeks to digest my experience at the Summit. At times, when asked about it by family and friends, I remain somewhat at a loss for words to describe the Summit, but I hope in this letter to convey to you some of my impressions. Before I do, however, I want to thank you for all of the practical elements of your generosity: the flight to Washington, the food and hotel room, your support of the amazing Academy of Achievement and its staff, who kept us all moving smoothly between events, the transportation around Washington, the incredible gala Banquet of the Golden Plate, and the gifts included in our packets. The Summit is clearly a monumental event to set up and pull off and with your support it was enormously enjoyable and an obvious success.

The Summit was quite simply the most extraordinary event I have ever attended. Your foundation, and the Academy of Achievement under your husband’s guidance, have crafted something utterly unique and positive in bringing together honorees and students year after year for the Summit. From the moment I arrived, I had stimulating discussions with the other student delegates as we began to learn about each other. Most of us were somewhat in the dark about what would actually happen during the Summit, and the excitement mounted as we looked through the binders we were given, which provided the first glimpse of the schedule, honorees, and special guests.

As a law student with a special interest in civil rights and constitutional law, the opening event at the Supreme Court left me simply star struck.

The Chief Justice and Justices Ginsburg and Kennedy were so gracious with their time and candid remarks, and to sit in the courtroom itself and hear these jurists speak of what it means to do the “work of judging,” as Justice Ginsburg put it, was something that I will never forget.

I thought of the historic arguments that have occurred in that room, so grand and yet such a small and thus intimate space, and I imagined what it must be like to stand at the podium and address the Court. I was reminded of your opening words to us, where you noted that we might meet some of our heroes, and there before us stood Justice Ginsburg, who is one of mine.

It was a humbling, deeply moving experience for me, and I thank you for making it possible for me to be there. There were, of course, more amazing panels and individual addresses than I can count. I was particularly struck by the message from several past and present honorees not only to follow our dreams, stay true to our goals, remain flexible in the face of change, and tackle real problems with innovative solutions, but also to be careful about what opportunities we take, as it is all too easy to end up in a “box” for longer than one might anticipate, only to look around after many years and realize that one did not fulfill one’s dreams and goals. To me as a student in law school, where we face considerable recruitment pressures, many of them for opportunities we might not really want yet might feel compelled to take for various reasons, this was a particularly meaningful message.
It goes almost without saying that to be addressed by luminaries like President Clinton, Bishop Tutu, Elie Wiesel, senators, congressional representatives, government officials, leaders in the arts, humanities, athletics, the environment, academia, journalism, social activism, and science was beyond compare. The speeches were inspiring and thought-provoking, the question-and-answer sessions enlightening and exciting, and the messages hit home time after time. And yet I was struck not only by the accomplishments and greatness of those who addressed us but also their essential humanity, the frank sharing of their past and present struggles and concerns, their success and fallibility. So few get such a window into the travails and achievements of so many leaders across so many disciplines, and I feel extremely lucky and grateful for the opportunity to be one of those few.
Among the most meaningful occasions were those between major events and after each day’s scheduled discussions, when I had the privilege of interacting with honorees and my fellow student delegates. The students shared ideas, concerns, and dreams, and we encouraged and challenged each other. The same happened with the honorees. I was amazed to have discussions with luminaries like Dana Priest and Scott Berg about how to put together and publicize a story that I find important (specifically, the terrible state of our juvenile and family court systems); they received me graciously, took my project seriously, and gave me concrete and step-by-step advice about how to pursue it. I have since followed some of those steps, doing the preliminary work on what I hope will be a book about this topic in a couple of years, and I am deeply grateful to them for their excellent guidance and to you for giving me the opportunity to benefit from it.

On another occasion, I had a long discussion with Dr. Elias Zerhouni about the interplay of health, poverty, education, housing, and urban infrastructure, all issues about which I have been concerned for a long time. Yet another time, Mayor Daley and I spoke about the possibilities and difficulties of making innovative changes in school systems. I also participated in lively, intense discussions with Ralph Nader and Marvin Minsky about politics in America and George Lucas about education, politics, and movies. There were other rather unexpected moments, too. For example, it turns out that Arthur Golden is fascinated by language development, and as a former pediatric neuropsychologist, I have a fair amount of expertise in that area, so we discussed it between events on the bus. It was probably the most fun I have ever had discussing the topic!

These experiences and more marked the International Achievement Summit for me. It was extraordinary, and I remain humbled, inspired, and motivated to pursue and achieve my goals. I want to thank you for sponsoring my attendance and for your work making the Summit such a wonderful event. To set up this opportunity for graduate students working toward achieving their dreams to meet with those who have persevered, innovated, and succeeded in achieving theirs is a terrific thing. I am honored to have been chosen to attend the Summit, and I always will remain deeply grateful to you for making it possible for me to be there. Please give your husband and the Academy staff my best regards and thanks as well for their hard work in making the Summit a spectacular four days.

Sincerely,

Joshua B. Kay


Dr. Joshua B. Kay graduated Phi Beta Kappa and with high honors in psychology from Oberlin College. He then went on to earn his Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Michigan. After completing a post-doctoral fellowship in rehabilitation psychology and neuropsychology at the University of Michigan Medical School, he joined the faculty. He was the principal investigator on a study of childhood head injury sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For several years, he directed the Disaster Mental Health Service for his local American Red Cross, receiving Special Congressional Recognition for Red Cross Service. He is now enrolled at the University of Michigan Law School.

Dr. Eran Bouchbinder

Dr. Eran Bouchbinder

Weizmann Institute of Science

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

It has been slightly more than a month since I came back from Washington D.C. and I am still under the deep impression of the unique experience of the 2007 International Achievement Summit. I would like to express my deepest gratitude to you for your generous invitation and the full support of my travel. I was honored to participate in such an amazing and stimulating event, having the opportunity to meet so many interesting and influential people. I would like to share with you some of my most exciting moments of the Summit.

As a theoretical physicist who spends most of his professional time trying to solve difficult mathematical problems that are not directly related to some of the most urgent issues of our time, I was very excited to participate in the long symposium at the NIH that opened my eyes to a much broader perspective on the interaction between science and society. On the one hand, basic research on subjects ranging from pioneering cancer treatment to global infectious diseases deeply affects society from the individual level to the human race level. On the other hand, I realized how public policy affects scientific research priorities, leading for example to dramatic differences in the quality of treatment of diseases like tuberculosis and malaria compared to HIV-AIDS. The presentation of Dr. Elias Zerhouni gave me a sense of the philosophical and financial aspects of running large scale scientific organizations.

Another moving and inspiring moment was during Dr. Benjamin Carson’s presentation, when I realized that indeed there is no contradiction between being a great scientist and physician and being personally involved in social and volunteering activities. On the contrary, his story strengthened my belief that scientists should be much more involved in social and educational projects. I was also very impressed by the speech of Congressman John R. Lewis, who is a living example for how individuals, driven by a deep feeling of injustice, can really change the world we live in.

President Clinton’s thrilling speech, in addition to providing a broad overview on the most important problems of humanity in the present and coming future, made me think of a hypothetical world in which public servants and leaders are deep, responsible, involved and caring people.

I had numerous personal conversations with other student delegates, discussing educational projects in rural China, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, social entrepreneurship and many other issues. In addition, as it was my first travel to Washington, D.C., I enjoyed very much the sites we visited.

These four days at the 2007 International Achievement Summit will continue to influence my life, both personal and professional, and I must admit that it would not be wise to try to estimate the full impact of this experience on me at this point in time. I would like to thank you again for giving me the opportunity to take part in the Summit and for your immense generosity.

Sincerely yours,

Dr. Eran Bouchbinder


Born and raised in Israel, Dr. Eran Bouchbinder earned his bachelor's degree in physics and philosophy from Tel Aviv University, graduating summa cum laude. He recently received his Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the Weizmann Institute of Science, where he is now a Postdoctoral Fellow. His research, which has been awarded the John F. Kennedy Prize for outstanding achievement, brings together fields such as statistical and non-linear physics, applied mathematics, and materials science, in order to understand various modes of material failure. In the future, he hopes to apportion his time between educational activities and research in theoretical physics.

Miljana Radivojevic

Miljana Radivojevic

University of Belgrade and University College London

Dear Mrs. Reynolds,

Coming back to “ordinary” life after the Academy of Achievement, I was thinking how to say thank you in a way that you still haven’t heard, how to put an original feedback to the most original idea ever, and not to fall into repetitiveness. I still don’t know. That is why it took me a few weeks to try to process the four most energizing and inspirational days in my life.

Bringing together the excellence of today and tomorrow, united in energies, thoughts and real action, is the noblest idea ever for looking into the future. Meeting remarkable minds of today, along with young achievers, actually revealed the strength and potential we all bear in ourselves, and in the times to come it will be our duty and responsibility to bring that out, as well as many others before us, leaving deep marks and memories for the future generations.

Friends and family continue to ask me the most difficult question: “What was the most impressive moment of the conference? Taking pictures with celebrities?” I told them: “It was just in listening to them. Only in carefully noting every word of the world’s most experienced people.” And I do believe in that. From Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Barack Obama and Bill Clinton to Dr. Ian Frazer, Dr. Craig Mello, Andre Agassi, Hilary Swank, Nora Ephron and Elie Wiesel, they all had the same message: The leaders of tomorrow rise from dedication to an idea, passion, vision and hard work to face obstacles on the road. They are not marked by birth — they must rely on inner strength, responsibility for their actions and ability to accept failure.

The Academy of Achievement came at the most important time in my life — the time of specializing in my profession, shaping my future path and setting my life and thoughts in the wider, bigger world picture.

It helped me immensely in terms of awareness that I am not alone — in my aspirations to make change, in my belief in a brighter future and the power each individual possesses to make the world a better place.

Hence, I have two promises to make to you: the first one is that I will spread the ideas accumulated with this event, inspiring young people and motivating them never to give up their dreams and visions. The other promise is that I will put my best energy and strength to achieve my career goals, now set even higher, and hopefully sometime in the future we shall meet once more at the Academy of Achievement!

Until then, if your roads ever bring you to Eastern Europe, I will gladly wish you a very warm welcome to Serbia, on behalf of myself, as well as the Royal Family of Karadjordjevic. I look forward to introducing you to my country’s culture, and the very special heritage that dynamic historical events have left behind, shaping our nation’s force and vivid spirit.

With best wishes,

Miljana Radivojevic


Miljana Radivojevic is currently engaged in graduate studies of prehistoric archaeology at the University of Belgrade and an M.Sc. course at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. Her research interests lie in the technological and social processes related to the manufacture of metals in prehistoric Europe. She completed her bachelor's studies in archaeology at the University of Belgrade, where she was Student Vice Dean of the Faculty of Philosophy and Student Vice Rector of the University. She plans to pursue a career as a researcher and teacher at the university level, with continued involvement in education policy and developing youth leadership.