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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Benazir Bhutto

Former Prime Minister of Pakistan

Now when I look back on it, it was my father who was against the gender constraints of my time. And my mother, she used to be a working woman herself, she joined the National Guards. She was a captain in the National Guards. She was the first woman in Karachi to own a car and to drive, and people used to talk about her because they said, you know, "We're not supposed to drive cars." But when I look back on it, it was my mother who taught that a woman grew up to be married and to have children, and she would tell my father in front of me, "Why do you want to educate her? No man will want to marry her." So all the time, for her, success depended on having a good catch as a husband, and having children. Whereas for my father, he broke free of those constraints, and he insisted that I have an education. He said, "Boys and girls are equal. I want my daughter to have the same opportunities."
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Benazir Bhutto

Former Prime Minister of Pakistan

I thought my mother would be the prime minister, and that I'd work for her to be the prime minister, and that's what I did. But my mother got sick and actually she had lung cancer, but we didn't know she was getting Alzheimer's. So she started behaving differently and we thought it's because she's had this serious illness, and she's reflecting on how to lead her life. And suddenly I found that since mommy was away and the whole party was about to collapse unless I was there, so I started looking after the party at that stage. When I went back, I remember people were shouting, "Prime Minister Benazir!" And suddenly it struck me that "looking after" means -- with mommy ill -- "looking after" means that I will be the prime minister. So it was in that sort of moment when I realized the responsibility that I had taken over could lead me all the way to an office that could govern the destiny of more than 100 million Muslims in Pakistan.
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Benazir Bhutto

Former Prime Minister of Pakistan

I grew up in a region full of powerful women and I thought, "Well if they can do it, I can do it too." But when I used to talk to others they would say, "You're mad. How can a woman succeed?" Not necessarily in politics, but I wanted to be a diplomat. I wanted to have my own newspaper. You know, I wanted to do things, and other people -- men and women -- would find that very surprising, so others doubted it. Even my own husband, when he married me, he thought I was under delusions that I could beat a military dictator, and he thought that, "When she wakes up and finds out that it's all wrong and she can't, then I'll be there to console her." Little knowing that I was the one who had to console him when I won.
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Keith Black

Pioneering Neurosurgeon

I went into an accelerated program, out of high school, at the University of Michigan, where they took 50 students, and we were admitted to both the medical school and undergrad out of high school, and you got your M.D. degree in six years, in addition to your undergrad degree. In the first year there I had an opportunity to take a course in neuroanatomy, and I knew right away. As soon as I looked and started studying the anatomy of the human brain, I realized how incredibly fascinating the human brain is, and that that's what I wanted to study. That's what I wanted to do.
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Keith Black

Pioneering Neurosurgeon

I was working in the lab of a heart surgeon who had developed his own artificial heart valve, and I had a concept that the heart valve might be damaging red blood cells, so I asked to do a research project using a scanning electron microscope at the time. When I was trying to basically learn the technique, I took some blood from the heart-lung bypass machine from patients undergoing heart-lung bypass, and when I incubated the red blood cells overnight, I noticed that a certain percentage of these cells change from their normal discoid shape to one that resembled a porcupine, called an econocyte. What I did was to describe the discocyte-econocyte transformation in patients undergoing heart-lung bypass, as an index of sub-lethal red blood cell damage. The importance being that the blood cells could not parachute through the small capillaries. Normally a capillary is about five microns and the blood cell is seven, and it has to parachute through. The econocytes get stuck and can cause blockage in those capillaries.
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Elizabeth Blackburn

Nobel Prize in Medicine

Elizabeth Blackburn: I was trained with somebody called Fred Sanger, who won a Nobel Prize, first for sequencing proteins, and he was working on the sequencing of nucleic acids, DNA and RNA, but then DNA when I was a Ph.D. student with him. And so there was very few ways of sequencing DNA then, and one of the things you could do was sequence DNA at the very ends of the long DNA molecules that make up genomes, and so I saw that there would be a feasibility, a way of looking at the ends of DNA, whereas perhaps in those days you couldn't look at the middle of DNA so well. And I went to Joe Gall's lab, and was interested in pursuing this, and Joe Gall, who I mentioned before was a really good mentor, is also an extremely good biologist in recognizing there are good biological systems for asking certain questions. And he was the one who said, "There is this system that has very small short chromosomes," and lots of them, meaning lots of ends, so that this would be something that -- you know, this would be a system. And I was excited because I wanted to look at the ends of things, the ends of DNA, which nobody really had been able to look at in eukaryotes, organisms like us that had nuclei in their cells. And so it was partly that it was doable, and partly because there was a good system to do it in.
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