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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


James V. Kimsey

Founding Chairman,
America Online

We put a lot of resources into the Newton thinking that people would carry a hand-held device around. We clearly were premature in that regard, the Newton came and went. We learned a lot. Although some would say we wasted those resources, I think we learned a lot. I think the hand-held device will be with us. I think we need to understand how people are going to use it, how we can provide the service that we provide through hand-held devices. I think at some point you'll walk into a room, there will be a flat screen on the wall and you will say, "Turn on," and it will recognize your voice and turn on. Say "Show me my bank account," it'll do that. It will show you your mail; it will show you your stockbroker's account.
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James V. Kimsey

Founding Chairman,
America Online

I'm doing projects in Washington, D.C., about what's wrong with the educational system and how it can be fixed. And, how you can reach these kids who, I think, are going to represent -- they're going to be the kids that hijack your car. And, if you don't reach out to them early on they're going to recognize that we have a great proliferation of wealth in the country and they're not participating. If you don't reach out to them and try to help them, I think it's going to be at your long-term peril. I think as a social obligation, it's not something that a government is particularly well organized or well resourced to do. I think Corporate America has that responsibility primarily, in my mind.
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B.B. King

King of the Blues

I used to think then that when I got older, being that preacher and what have you, I was going to have me a little farm. Not a plantation, a little farm. I could picture seeing myself plowing, my mule or on my tractor. Picture seeing a beautiful woman with my two or three kids coming out, bringing me some water to the farm where I'm working at. I don't want her to work. I want to work for her. I want her to come up and bring me my little kids, bring me some water or a piece of pie or something. Those were my dreams, not this. Those were my dreams, but when this did start to happen, and when I started to feel for real that I could do what I was doing, the way the people treated me, I was sort of like a guest at someone's home. I don't want to do anything to make them not be happy that they have a guest, me.
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B.B. King

King of the Blues

I happen to think that the great spirit God made us all, put us all here for a reason. And all of us have something to do, and I think we have -- there's a word I used to hear a lot called "Your Brother's Keeper." So I believe that I am my brother's keeper. So, I think that there's a place for playing the guitar. There's a place for singing the blues. I'm harming nobody. People used the word quite often -- there was a word, I guess, that came from the early slaves, when a person sang blues as I do or did, they call it "singing them old reels." Now I haven't found out yet what that meant, "the reels," but I do know what they meant when they said "the Devil's music." But, I started thinking to myself, and I still do, they don't equate a bus driver or a truck driver or the guy plowing the mules with working for the Devil. Why do my singing and my playing have to be working for the Devil? I tell stories like other people do in song. So, I started thinking, you know, maybe they got something for themselves, but I don't see where I'm doing anything wrong to anyone, so why shouldn't I? And, I started to work on it.
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B.B. King

King of the Blues

I have learned that blues singing is just like singing any other kind of song. You still try to tell the story. Your story may not be as -- shall we say -- some of the love songs that's written by a lot of the great singers, or great writers I should say, but you have a soul, you have a heart, you have a feeling and your music is life. Life as we've lived it in the past, life as we're living it today, and life as I believe we'll live tomorrow, because it has to do with people, places and things. If it's a man, we think in terms of the lady, the opposite sex. If it's a woman she thinks in terms of the man, but it's still love, even though we call it blues. The myth is everybody thinks it's all sad because it started from the slaves. That is a myth. Some of it is, but tell me what music doesn't have some sadness in it, and then I'll try to learn a little bit more about the blues.
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Coretta Scott King

Pioneer of Civil Rights

Coretta Scott King: I grew up in the Deep South. It was totally segregated in terms of race, and everything was separate but unequal. I had wonderful parents who inspired me to be the best person that I could be, and my mother always told me that I was going to go to college, even if she didn't have but one dress to put on. So I grew up knowing that I was going to somehow find a way out of the situation I grew up in.
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Coretta Scott King

Pioneer of Civil Rights

After my first semester in Boston in 1951, I met Martin Luther King, Jr. Of course, Martin Luther King, Jr. was studying for his doctorate in systematic theology, and he was going to go back South and pastor a Baptist Church, and he was looking for a wife. I wasn't looking for a husband, but he was a wonderful human being, and he made everyone feel special, and he made me feel very special as a woman. I still resisted his overtures, but after he persisted, I had to pray about it, because my parents were religious, I was brought up in the church, and I had a strong faith. I always believed that there was a purpose for my life, and that I had to seek that purpose, and that if I discovered that purpose, then I believed that I would be successful in what I was doing. And I thought I had found that purpose when I decided that music was going to be my career -- concert singing. I was going to be trained as a concert singer at the New England Conservatory of Music. I studied voice the first year, and after I met Martin and prayed about whether or not I should open myself to that relationship, I had a dream, and in that dream, I was made to feel that I should allow myself to be open and stop fighting the relationship. And that's what I did, and of course the rest is history.
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Coretta Scott King

Pioneer of Civil Rights

After we married, we moved to Montgomery, Alabama, where my husband had accepted an invitation to be the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. Before long, we found ourselves in the middle of the Montgomery bus boycott, and Martin was elected leader of the protest movement. As the boycott continued, I had a growing sense that I was involved in something so much greater than myself, something of profound historic importance. I came to the realization that we had been thrust into the forefront of a movement to liberate oppressed people, not only in Montgomery but also throughout our country, and this movement had worldwide implications. I felt blessed to have been called to be a part of such a noble and historic cause.
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