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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Thomas Starzl

Father of Modern Transplantation

Thomas Starzl: Transplantation overall was a field that grew slowly at first, but then achieved monumental stature, actually changed the philosophy by which medicine is practiced, without knowing what was being accomplished. What were the mechanisms? What is the explanation? What finally brought some peace of mind, with the insight of knowledge, that transplantation actually could be -- and frequently was -- a curative operation. That that downhill slope of a graft being under constant attack and slowly, slowly losing ground until you were going to get a phone call. When it was finally discovered what the mechanisms were -- and they all surrounded the chimerism discoveries -- you realized that that was not an inevitable downhill slope. That transplantation was inherently a curative procedure that you could do on a child, like my grandson or a baby, and expect the child to grow up and go to college and have their own children. And that happened actually. Many of the transplant patients have had children who have had children. That early group of kidney patients that I did in 1962 and 1963, a group of 45 or 46, there are some still -- nine or ten of those patients -- still going with that original graft. That means that they're approaching 50 years now. In fact, they're in their 48th or 49th year right now. Those are the longest. Not a single case, but they are the longest patients in the world. And many of them have gotten off of (immunosuppressant) drugs. That is another unique observation. The longest surviving liver recipient in the world is in her 41st or 42nd year. And there are many following behind, you know. Like 35 to 40 years.
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Thomas Starzl

Father of Modern Transplantation

In 1992 we set out to try to find out what the hell was going on. What were in fact the mechanisms by which it had been possible to successfully transplant organs and have them stick? Not only stay functioning, but to be able in the long run to get off drugs, in some cases. So that question was what drove the search for chimerism. And we found it in every surviving patient. Now if you had made the observation that we did in 1992, in isolation, it would have been dismissed as an artifact, perhaps even as an error, or as some kind of an epiphenomenon. You know, nothing. But armed with this memory bank of nearly a half century, the minute we found tumors, we found the chimeric cells. I was able to put every damn thing together that had been a mystery before, because transplantation in the conventional way that immunologists were viewing it was not only unsound, it was totally inexplicable. And the observations that were being made in the clinic about rejection, its reversal, and all the various complications and phenomenon, never could be explained. But suddenly with that discovery, you take all those little pieces, and just like magic, as if a magnet had pulled them together in exactly the right position, filled the whole picture out. And that piece of magic took place after I wrote The Puzzle People. It's one of the later printings, which you may not have, has the story, briefly summarized in four or five pages. I'll get that for you if you don't have it.
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Martha Stewart

Multi-Media Lifestyle Entrepreneur

Martha Stewart: I have a lot of energy. I have a great desire to absorb information. I'm not a sponge exactly, but I find that something I look at -- just walking around Williamsburg, for example -- is a great opportunity for ideas. I've been here before, I've seen things before, but now my eye gets keener and keener. So I can pick up little things: just the pattern of a brick walk, or the way they've attached a light to a house.
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Robert Strauss

Presidential Medal of Freedom

Robert Strauss: My mother was the major inspiration in my life, not my father. I got along with him well, but he was not very strong. My mother was strong and kind, and I guess we never had a cross word. She used to worry that I was studying too much, and my father used to say, "Good God Almighty! How can you say he's studying too much? He never does anything but run around, and he makes terrible grades, and you tell him not to study so much." And her answer would be, "Well, you know, if he starts worrying about his grades, he'll get an ulcer, and I don't want him to lose his health. He's got such a long life ahead of him, and he's going into politics and diplomacy." So she had already begun to carve out -- that's the inspiration I had. Instead of a teacher, it was my mother.
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Robert Strauss

Presidential Medal of Freedom

I came from a Jewish family, and my parents lived, as I said, in West Texas, and I had a grandmother who lived in Forth Worth, and on one of the high holidays in the fall, the family would all come to Fort Worth, and we would spend a day or so with my grandmother, who came from Germany and who was very German -- in fact, we called her grossmama not "grandmother." But when they would gather around there, my mother would always say, "My son Bobby is going to be a diplomat, and he's going into politics, and he'll be the first Jewish Governor of the State of Texas." I can remember being 14 years old, 12, 13 years old maybe, in that age, and walking into the room, and one of my uncles would say, "Well, here comes the Governor," and they would all laugh, and I could have killed the sonofabitches. But my mother ignored them totally. She would just smile. And she wasn't far wrong; I had a successful political career.
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