Academy of Achievement Logo
Home
Achiever Gallery
Keys to Success
 Passion
   + [ Vision ]
 Preparation
 Courage
 Perseverance
 Integrity
 The American Dream
Achievement Podcasts
About the Academy
For Teachers

Search the site

Academy Careers

 
 
Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Leon Lederman

Nobel Prize in Physics

Leon Lederman: Let's take a metaphor. You have a trunk. And all kinds of combination locks and you know this trunk is important because you found it in an attic. It's covered with cobwebs, and must be really good. People are working on the combinations and you come in, sort of six months later, and they're all working on the combinations, and they have these papers and computer codes, and they're working out, and you say, "Look at all these bright guys. They haven't been able to get into the trunk. There's something they're missing." And you walk around the back -- the back is open. Nobody went to look at the back of the trunk. Well, it's kind of a silly metaphor but, in a way, science can often be that way. You know that a lot of very bright people have been working on a problem. You know there's a solution, right? So, you say, "What is it that they haven't thought about?"
View Interview with Leon Lederman
View Biography of Leon Lederman
View Profile of Leon Lederman
View Photo Gallery of Leon Lederman



Leon Lederman

Nobel Prize in Physics

Leon Lederman: Many, many great theoretical breakthroughs in physics and mathematics were done by very young people. Of course, you have to know something, so that's experience, and experience grows with age, creativity is declining with age. You've got to find that balance between the two which will give you your peak years of accomplishment. If you have pure creativity, but you don't know anything, it's too bad. Sometimes it's bad to know too much. I remember Wolfgang Pauli, a very famous Austrian physicist, complaining about his own lack of creativity, said, "Ach, I know too much!" You see, if you know too much, then you don't have that fresh view which allows you to see the breakthrough idea.
View Interview with Leon Lederman
View Biography of Leon Lederman
View Profile of Leon Lederman
View Photo Gallery of Leon Lederman



Robert Lefkowitz

Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Robert Lefkowitz: Receptors are molecules, we now know, on cells, with which hormones and drugs interact to begin their biological actions. To give you a specific example, consider adrenaline, also known as epinephrine. Let's say we have a patient with asthma and their airways are constricted. They can't breathe. We give them adrenaline and the airways relax because of the smooth muscle in their airways relaxes when the adrenaline works on it. How does the adrenaline know to work on that, and to stimulate the heart, rather than to work on your nose or your retina or something like that? Well, the answer is, and what seemed obvious to me, is there must be molecules on the cells that the adrenaline would bind to, much like a key interacts with a lock, where the key would be the adrenaline, but it could be any hormone by extension. And this mystical receptor I was looking for would be like a lock on the cell, and it would fit in, and the adrenaline would then do something to that lock, open it, and things would happen in the cell. That was the idea. So how to prove this? Well, at first, there was no way to even study it.
View Interview with Robert Lefkowitz
View Biography of Robert Lefkowitz
View Profile of Robert Lefkowitz
View Photo Gallery of Robert Lefkowitz



John Lewis

Champion of Civil Rights

John Lewis: I was not the brightest student. I studied. I worked hard, but from time to time my mother and father, especially my father, wanted us to stay out of school and work in the field, and I knew I needed to get an education. I wanted to get an education. So sometimes when my father would suggest that we'd have to stay home and plot a mule, help gather the crops, I would get up early in the morning, get dressed, and get my book bag and hide under the front porch, and when I heard the school bus coming up the hill, I would run out and get on that school bus and go off to school. And sometimes my father would say, "You know, I told you to stay home, but you went off to school." And we would talk, but he knew that I saw the value of education and I wanted to get an education. I didn't like working out in the hot sun picking cotton, pulling corn, gathering peanuts, and I wanted to get an education because I knew I needed it, and I knew it would be better for me in the days and years to come.
View Interview with John Lewis
View Biography of John Lewis
View Profile of John Lewis
View Photo Gallery of John Lewis



John Lewis

Champion of Civil Rights

We need to find a way to make this world a little more peaceful. Maybe this generation of young people can get humankind to come to another level, to move to a higher level where we can lay down the tools and instruments of violence and war and stop the madness. Maybe in our own country we can do something about providing health care for all of our citizens, that some of the resources that we use to build bombs and missiles and guns can be used for education, for health care, taking care of the elderly, our children, the disabled, the homeless, and find a cure for some of the ills and diseases that impact human beings, not just here in America but around the world.
View Interview with John Lewis
View Biography of John Lewis
View Profile of John Lewis
View Photo Gallery of John Lewis



Browse Vision quotes by achiever last name

Previous Page

          

Next Page