Academy of Achievement Logo
Home
Achiever Gallery
Keys to Success
 Passion
 Vision
   + [ Preparation ]
 Courage
 Perseverance
 Integrity
 The American Dream
Achievement Podcasts
About the Academy
For Teachers

Search the site

Academy Careers

 
 
Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Ralph Nader

Consumer Crusader

Ralph Nader: Yes. Citizenship requires skills like any other occupation or profession, and it's good to learn on the job. You can read about citizen movements, the farmer, Populist, Progressive movements at the turn of the century, and the Civil Rights movement. But, it's good to learn it by doing. And, you get better every year you get better. You know how to develop strategies and coalitions and how to get the attention of the media and how to use the levers of action, and how to be perfectly willing to generate controversy which gets people thinking.
View Interview with Ralph Nader
View Biography of Ralph Nader
View Profile of Ralph Nader
View Photo Gallery of Ralph Nader



Paul Nitze

Presidential Medal of Freedom

Ambassador Dobrynin, who was the Soviet Ambassador in Washington, had gone off to India to meet with the new Indian prime minister. And in the course of his discussions there, he had said, "This meeting in Reykjavik is going to be a much more important meeting than the world has realized today. When Mr. Gorbachev arrives there, he is going to make really very substantial concessions to the American side, and the Americans will overestimate those concessions and they will demand more, and then we will turn the tables on them. We will then hold them up to public scorn around the world for having blocked the chances for real progress." When we heard this report of what Dobrynin had told the Indians, then the question was, well what should we do? Should we call the meeting off? Because earlier, the Soviets had told us this was going to be a very pro forma meeting, not going to discuss anything much, it was only going to talk about INF (Intermediate Nuclear Forces) and about nothing else. So this meeting should be called off, or should we go forward with it? My recommendation, we should go forward with it. We should await Mr. Gorbachev's marvelous concessions. We should then say we take all those concessions, but we shouldn't give anything more. Therefore we should come out winning without cost out of these negotiations.
View Interview with Paul Nitze
View Biography of Paul Nitze
View Profile of Paul Nitze
View Photo Gallery of Paul Nitze



Paul Nitze

Presidential Medal of Freedom

When I was a senior at college I became ill with infectious jaundice and was very ill and couldn't go to graduate school. The fact that I went straight into business and learned something about accounting and running an office early in life, when you can really absorb it fast, turned out to be very fortunate indeed. I've never regretted not having gone straight to graduate school, thereafter. Having entered Wall Street just days before the Great Depression, I lost my shirt right away of course, as far as assets in hand. Boy, that was great experience, to live through all of the disasters that can befall one in the economic world, and see it happen to others. How do you weave through those kinds of economic difficulties? Learned there is an invaluable lesson in learning how to deal with complicated financial problems. So, those of us who had jobs during the Great Depression, I think we learned more and learned it faster than one could have learned otherwise. So that generation of Wall Street fellows, we all ended up knowing something about not just economics in practice, but world finance as well.
View Interview with Paul Nitze
View Biography of Paul Nitze
View Profile of Paul Nitze
View Photo Gallery of Paul Nitze



Paul Nitze

Presidential Medal of Freedom

Paul Nitze: Mr. Clarence Dillon, who was my first real boss on Wall Street, was the most brilliant man I've ever worked with or for. I think he had an extremely intelligent mind, and I learned a great deal about analyzing situations. Well, the main lesson that I learned from him was that there was a contrast between analyzing a situation, and then doing something about it. Those were two different worlds. When you are analyzing something, you want to be coldly objective. You want to try to find the facts, find everybody's advice about it. Look at it without prior bias of any kind. But, then once you'd made up your mind, what needed to be done, then you wanted to change your personality. You didn't want to be disturbed by re-thinking it, you wanted to act. And, you want to act decisively, and produce the intended result without deviation, and only if you got way off, if it turned out that you were way wrong, did you want to reconsider what you had made your decision on.
View Interview with Paul Nitze
View Biography of Paul Nitze
View Profile of Paul Nitze
View Photo Gallery of Paul Nitze



Jessye Norman

Legendary Opera Soprano

It could be very easy to ruin a young voice by having training in singing too soon, particularly for women. Those muscles on the middle of our bodies that actually support singing are still very much developing when we are teenagers. And if we go to those classes, which, of course, are proliferating all over the world now, because kids think if they can just sing on television and be heard by the right person they'll have a record deal, as it were, sort of overnight. That isn't the way life works. Not real life. That's the way life works on television. It really is so important not to try to use those muscles before they are fully developed, because if you do that, the tendency is to use muscles in the neck, and muscles that are not there for that. Those muscles are there for chewing, absolutely. And I'm sure that you have noticed, as well, that one can see rather young singers that participate and the jaw shakes. That's because the emphasis is being put on the wrong muscles, and they probably started doing it much too early, because these muscles were not developed so the body uses whatever there is.
View Interview with Jessye Norman
View Biography of Jessye Norman
View Profile of Jessye Norman
View Photo Gallery of Jessye Norman



Jessye Norman

Legendary Opera Soprano

Jessye Norman: The thing that I say to young singers, to try to frighten them into not sort of taking themselves too seriously before the body is really ready for it, is that these vocal chords are unforgiving. If we abuse them, if we use them in the wrong way too early, they stretch, and like any ligament they don't go back. They don't go back. So it's not a matter of having sort of ruined your voice at age 16, if you can just be quiet for two years everything is going to be all right. That isn't the way it works. It's not like a muscle that you can massage, or you can give it an injection or something, or you can rest it, and have it be all right in a matter of time. The vocal chords don't work like that. So I was very lucky to work with Carolyn Grant to begin to understand how the voice is produced. She was a great vocal pedagogue, what one calls the study of vocal anatomy. So I understood how all of this works: where the diaphragm is in the body, and what part of the body sort of pushes the air out of the lungs and through the trachea and past the vocal chord, and how this all works. So that it's not some sort of mysterious thing that happens to my body, that maybe it's good one day and maybe it's not good the next day. At least I know how it's meant to function, scientifically.
View Interview with Jessye Norman
View Biography of Jessye Norman
View Profile of Jessye Norman
View Photo Gallery of Jessye Norman



Jessye Norman

Legendary Opera Soprano

They have a new production of The Trojans at Covent Garden which is wonderful, and some of the singers, I was visiting with them backstage, and one of the singers came up to me and said, "My agent told me he was at the Met when you did both parts. How in the world could you do both parts? I'm exhausted after singing Cassandra." I said, "Well, you have to carbo load the night before. You have to prepare for that the way a marathon runner would prepare to run for 26 miles. Why anybody would want to run for 26 miles is beyond my understanding, but that's something else again! So you have to prepare your body to have enough stored energy upon which you can call, once the day arrives that you've got to do this. So I eat in a completely different manner when preparing for something that's going to happen like that the next day.
View Interview with Jessye Norman
View Biography of Jessye Norman
View Profile of Jessye Norman
View Photo Gallery of Jessye Norman



Browse Preparation quotes by achiever last name

Previous Page

          

Next Page