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Sir Timothy Berners-Lee

Father of the World Wide Web

I was really lucky to know how a computer worked, 'cause I'd built one. I built it. I had my terminal with its 64-character lines, and I had it connected to my computer, which was in a crate this big with a big car battery at the bottom in case the power failed. I knew how it worked because I knew how I could have built the chip out of gates, and I knew how I could have built the gates out of transistors. I didn't really know how transistors worked, but I knew I could have made the equivalents of a transistor. I learned a certain amount from the physics course about how solid-state systems work, and I knew how I could emulate each of those out of nails. So now, when I look at a laptop, I see all those pixels and see the windows moving. I know that I could build the operating systems, and I have built little operating systems since. I don't know how well anybody nowadays, without going through that historical phase, could ever feel that they really know how a computer works.
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Sir Timothy Berners-Lee

Father of the World Wide Web

Math was my favorite subject, I suppose, at school, but on the other hand, I was interested in this electronics. So I thought I'd do physics as being a compromise between the two. It wasn't. It was something completely different, I realized. The philosophy of physics is different, and I think physics is pretty special. I'm glad that I did do it, but it did not prepare me. It did not turn me into a mathematician, and it did not really allow me to do electronics. It allowed me to do a lot of thinking, all sorts of interesting ways, and I realized the relationship between the microscopic and the macroscopic. The microscopic rules of behavior of atoms, and the macroscopic behavior of them and so on, is really very interesting. That difference is now crucial between the microscopic way in which two computers interact over the network and the way the whole web behaves, which we're now calling "web science." The difference between the microscopic and the macroscopic is still a challenging step.
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Sir Timothy Berners-Lee

Father of the World Wide Web

What people describe as the "Aha!" moment, the "eureka" moment, I think this idea of it being a moment, I'm very suspicious of. I don't actually believe that Archimedes sat in the bath, saw the water up, and said "Eureka!" I think he probably tried all kinds of things. He tried ways of filling the crown full of little marbles maybe and counting the marbles. Goodness knows what. No, he tried all kinds of ways of estimating its volume. And then he figured, "Ah goodness! Yeah. Water will do it!" But he'd done a lot of preparation, and he probably had a lot of ideas pretty close to it. And in fact, it didn't happen -- (snaps). If you'd started him off on the problem totally fresh and sat him in the bath, nothing would have happened. It wouldn't have happened without him discussing the problem with people, without him starting to form all of these hypotheses, half-formed things.
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Yogi Berra

Baseball Hall of Fame

Yogi Berra: Well, it's not an easy game. You got to stay at it. You really do. You know, a lot of people just think - we had guys - kids today, they're organized today. We weren't organized. Like you and I, you pitch to me, and I'd throw to you after. And, like I said, that cartball taught me a lot, softball. You got to keep your eye - you can't swing hard in softball, that's another thing. I never swung. If I swung hard, I would swing and miss a lot. And, you play with bottle caps, that ain't gonna make you swing hard, neither. And one strike, you were out. And you had to get four hits before you get a run. And we played it day and night. We loved it. Whatever was in season. I played a lot of soccer. I love soccer. I love to watch soccer games on TV. And back there on the Hill, we played against - soccer, we had Spanish living there, the Italians and Germans and Irish. We played against each other. And, I used to enjoy it. That was good. That's a good conditioning game, that soccer. It is.
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Yogi Berra

Baseball Hall of Fame

Yogi Berra: I was a lousy catcher 'til they got Bill Dickey there. Dickey worked me hard. And, I liked it, though, what he did for me. I owe everything to Bill Dickey, I really do. He made me a good catcher. How to block balls. I try to do that to some of the kids today. They've got their own style, some today, you know. And, now everybody tells me, "Boy, you're so short." I say, "Well, I make a good target. I don't have to bend down so far. I'm in the strike zone all the time." But Dickey, he really worked me, boy. Worked me to death, and I loved him for it. And, then it came easy. It came easy for me. Like a lot of people, I try to tell them, I know they take that crow hop now, you know, when they throw to second base, but I don't. But see, I go into a ball. I can let you swing a bat, and I go across home plate, you won't hit me.
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Yogi Berra

Baseball Hall of Fame

Yogi Berra: Work hard at it. It's not easy. Anytime you got a chance to hit, hit! And, that's what we did. And, practice what you're doing. You know, fielding, whatever position you play. I never caught until I turned pro. I played second base, I pitched a little bit, and I played outfield. And, they thought I had a good arm, but I didn't know where I was going. That's when they got hold of Dickey. Like I said, I was a terrible catcher, but I had somebody to teach me.
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Yogi Berra

Baseball Hall of Fame

They're making the parks small. They want to see home runs today. It seems like it, they want to do that and I get a kick out of them. You know, they run around the park. You know, they jog around the park. And, I used to tell them when I was coaching, I said, "Do you jog when you run to first base?" We used to do 20 laps, 100 yards, and walk back. A hundred yards. After every spring training game, we always did. Pitchers used to run from foul-line to foul-line, and they used to do it during the season while he wasn't pitching. The starters would do it. 'Cause they're all four bases. Running was a lot to us. They made you run.
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Jeff Bezos

Founder and CEO, Amazon.com

Jeff Bezos: I toyed with the idea of starting a company and even talked to a couple of friends about starting a company, and ultimately decided that it would be smarter to wait and learn a little bit more about business and the way the world works. You know, one of the things that it's very hard to believe when you're 22 or 23 years old is that you don't already know everything. It turns out -- people learn more and more as they get older -- that you seem to learn, you seem to realize that you know less and less every year that goes by. I can only imagine that by the time I'm 70 I will realize I know nothing. So that was, I think, a very good decision to not do that. I went to work for a start-up company, but one in New York City that was building a network for helping brokerage firms clear trades. It is kind of an obscure thing, and it's not very interesting to go into, but it used my technical skills, and it was very fun work, and I loved the people I was working with. From then on, I started working at the intersection of computers and finance, and stayed on Wall Street for a long time, ultimately worked for a company that did this thing called quantitative hedge fund trading. What we did was we programmed the computers and then the computers made stock trades, and that was very interesting too. And that was where I was working when I came across the fact that the web was growing at 2,300 percent a year, and that's what led to the forming of Amazon.com.
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Jeff Bezos

Founder and CEO, Amazon.com

Our timing was good, our choice of product categories -- books -- was a very good choice. And we did a lot of analysis on that to pick that category as the first best category for E-commerce online, but there were no guarantees that that was a good category. At the time we launched this business it wasn't even crystal clear that the technology would improve fast enough that ordinary people -- non-computer people -- would even want to bother with this technology. So, that was good luck.
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Jeff Bezos

Founder and CEO, Amazon.com

So, you want to start a company. Well, the first thing you do is you should write a business plan, and so I did that. I wrote about a 30-page business plan. I wrote a first draft. In fact, I wrote the first draft on the car trip from the East Coast to the West Coast. And, that is very helpful. You know the business plan won't survive its first encounters with reality. It will always be different. The reality will never be the plan, but the discipline of writing the plan forces you to think through some of the issues and to get sort of mentally comfortable in the space. Then you start to understand, if you push on this knob this will move over here and so on. So, that's the first step.
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