Academy of Achievement Logo
Home
Achiever Gallery
Keys to Success
 Passion
 Vision
   + [ Preparation ]
 Courage
 Perseverance
 Integrity
 The American Dream
Achievement Podcasts
About the Academy
For Teachers

Search the site

Academy Careers

 
 
Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Sir Edmund Hillary

Conqueror of Mt. Everest

Sir Edmund Hillary: The press and the public have created an image of Ed Hillary, hero and explorer which simply doesn't exist. They've painted a picture of me as a heroic type, full of enormous courage, tremendous strength, undying enthusiasm and all the rest of it. But it's all really just a story, that's been written up in the newspapers. I'm a person, as I've said, of modest abilities, with a good deal of determination, and I do quite a lot of planning ahead. With careful planning and good motivation, I think you can often achieve things that other much more talented people would probably do much more easily. But then, a lot of these very talented people are not strongly motivated to carry out the things that I've been involved in.
View Interview with Sir Edmund Hillary
View Biography of Sir Edmund Hillary
View Profile of Sir Edmund Hillary
View Photo Gallery of Sir Edmund Hillary



Sir Edmund Hillary

Conqueror of Mt. Everest

If I'm selecting a group, the first thing one has to look for is a record of achievement. It may be modest achievement, but people have shown that they can persist, they can carry out objectives and get to a final solution. If they can do that on small things, there's a very good chance that they'll perform well on big things at the same time. Then, I'm a great believer in a really good sense of humor. If you have someone in an expedition who's reasonably competent and has a great sense of humor, they're a very stimulating factor for the whole team, and they play a very important psychological part, I think in the success of the team.
View Interview with Sir Edmund Hillary
View Biography of Sir Edmund Hillary
View Profile of Sir Edmund Hillary
View Photo Gallery of Sir Edmund Hillary



Sir Edmund Hillary

Conqueror of Mt. Everest

But, I recommend to younger people that it's foolish to start from scratch again. Older people really have a lot of experience. They have a lot of knowledge. Some of them are even quite pleasant people, and I recommend to the young ones to take advantage of all that previous experience and knowledge and understanding which older people have. Absorb it all, and then drop the old people if you'd like, and go off and do your own thing. At least you're starting with all that built-up accumulation of knowledge and understanding that's been going on for generations. I think this is a very valuable thing that young people can do. Quite often a young person who is unhappy and uncertain, can make friendships with some slightly older people with more experience and maybe learn a little bit from them and get a little bit more certain in themselves. Now I know a lot of youngsters couldn't care less about this, but that's what I would recommend to a lot of them. I actually learned a lot from older people when I was in my 20s. What little I did learn was mostly from older people, not from young ones.
View Interview with Sir Edmund Hillary
View Biography of Sir Edmund Hillary
View Profile of Sir Edmund Hillary
View Photo Gallery of Sir Edmund Hillary



David Ho

AIDS Research Pioneer

I was at the right place at the right time, having just finished the right type of training, getting ready to do the right type of training that would be relevant to this problem. Chance does play a very, very important role. The other thing I've been telling some of the students here is that serendipity plays an important role, but we have to be prepared to take advantage of the opportunities that are bubbled up by serendipity. And, I certainly, for this particular problem, once I grabbed onto it I did not let go, even though in the early years it was not a problem and people would say, "Well why are you interested in a problem that effects the gay men and drug users?" You know, it's a disease and one should not look upon it in that way. And so, I went full speed ahead on this particular problem.
View Interview with David Ho
View Biography of David Ho
View Profile of David Ho
View Photo Gallery of David Ho



David Ho

AIDS Research Pioneer

A lot of what we're looking at is the result of that process from our lab as well as the laboratories of several groups around the world, basically realizing the kinetics of the virus, using that information to do calculations. And, this is where my physical science background really came in useful, having a strong background in mathematics and applying it to biology and then being able to go on with a hypothesis, saying that if we approach treatment in this fashion with these types of drugs in combination, these are the results we expect. And, most of that has come true over the last few years, and now we need to see how far we could go with this whole strategy.
View Interview with David Ho
View Biography of David Ho
View Profile of David Ho
View Photo Gallery of David Ho



Susan Hockfield

President Emeritus, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

When I think back to the things that intrigued me, when I was probably by four or five, it was biological things. And so I had this sense of enormous anticipation. My older sister, of course, got to freshman biology in high school before I did. I was so envious. Oh, I was so envious! And when I finally got to that course it was just heaven. And then I took a marvelous course my senior year. There was an advanced biology class for a small set of students who had been through the whole science sequence, and it was a wonderful, wonderful class. We worked with real animals, we did experiments with rats. It was really about mammalian physiology, and that was a terrific class. And I arranged -- I don't know where I got this idea -- but I arranged to take the AP exam in biology. The school didn't give an AP course in biology. There was AP English and AP math -- probably AP history, I don't think I took that -- but somehow I got the idea in my head that I would like to take AP biology. So I was excused from class to spend -- I don't remember how many weeks -- sitting in the library reading a college biology textbook, which was interesting but I don't describe it as a lot of fun.
View Interview with Susan Hockfield
View Biography of Susan Hockfield
View Profile of Susan Hockfield
View Photo Gallery of Susan Hockfield



Susan Hockfield

President Emeritus, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Susan Hockfield: Steven Gobel. That was funny. Again, serendipity, unusual. I was the only graduate student he ever had. At NIH there aren't graduate students. Generally, you have post-docs -- you don't have graduate students -- and so I was his only graduate student, and what a wonderful experience for me. I had worked in a lab already for two years, so if you enter graduate school without any previous lab experience, there's a huge amount you need to learn just in terms of how you work in a lab. There are thousands of things about how you work in a lab that you just need to learn, and it takes some time. But I had already learned much of that as a lab technician, and if I had gone to work with a scientist who is used to having graduate students, I would've done the things that graduate students do. But instead I went to work with someone who was used to having post-docs, so he didn't think there was anything unusual about my fast-forwarding through that graduate student stuff and just jumping in essentially at a post-doc level. So my graduate research was done with the kind of independence normally accorded only to a post-doc, and I was in an environment where everyone was considered to be a mature scientist, and it was just wonderful. Wonderful. There were very few graduate students around, so I had access to spectacular scientists, one on one, in the midst of this very large group in which I was working. A hugely fortunate, deep, intense educational experience.
View Interview with Susan Hockfield
View Biography of Susan Hockfield
View Profile of Susan Hockfield
View Photo Gallery of Susan Hockfield



Browse Preparation quotes by achiever last name

Previous Page

          

Next Page