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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Twyla Tharp

Dancer and Choreographer

We thought that there were certain possibilities, in terms of physical movement, in terms of community, and in terms of what dance could address in our society. And those were the issues that we went after. And we worked with a great deal of rigor. Which is to say, we were very, very dedicated. We worked six days a week, we worked at least six hours every day. We did not perform much at all. It was really about the experience of learning and exploring and growing, for five years.
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Twyla Tharp

Dancer and Choreographer

I don't think politicians should be allowed into power who are not familiar with their bodies, because that's where our bottom line is. And I know that they would make totally different decisions if they felt responsible simply for their own bodies, for starters, for example. I think that anybody who wants to challenge their mind to operate -- any artists, any writer, any economist, any entrepreneur who wants their mind to function at a peak knows they have to work physically at something, whatever, on a daily basis. It is a necessary part of the human machine. We're a machine and we have to be worked in the same way we have to be fed. So it's not a question of being turned on, it's a question of respecting a necessity.
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Twyla Tharp

Dancer and Choreographer

I began ear training when I was about six months old. My mother was a concert pianist, and she started all of her children with music before they were a year old. Then she began to see that I had a musical gift, and that I should be tutored outside the house, because she didn't want it to become too much an amateur situation. She wanted it to be objectified. So I started formal piano training when I was four. From there I had little violas, and I had dancing lessons of every sort and description, and painting lessons. German wasn't taught in the high school, so I had German. And shorthand, in case I ever needed to be a secretary or, if I didn't need to be a secretary, at least when I went to college I would be able to take all my lectures down verbatim, and then go back and see what the professor had said. That's the downside of my mother's education because she made no selections, and she made it seem as though one had a lifetime to do that. That's no true. A young person has to start making decisions for themselves at a much earlier age than an overbearing parent allows one. I think that in combination with the degree to which a childhood and the ability to socialize was taken away, was eradicated from my life. It was a stiff price to pay for the education that I received. But, you know, six of one, half-a-dozen of another. I have the wherewithal to challenge myself for my entire life. That's a great gift. The rest of the pieces I work at reassembling for myself.
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Wayne Thiebaud

Painter and Teacher

Wayne Thiebaud: I have no idea. I think maybe there can be issues where examples can be shown of maybe how to work, how to think, how to criticize, and the challenge of not doing something which is known, but something which is unknown. I think creativity is a very mysterious idea. But if you are interested in creativity, then I think the fundamentals of learning and criticizing are essential.
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Michael Thornton

Medal of Honor

Your first eight weeks of training you go through a lot of physical -- I mean, harassing, harassing, harassing, harassment. Just everybody telling you you're worthless and you're not this. Doing push-ups, calisthenics, running. I mean, you don't go anywhere. You run everywhere, you know. You're the lowest animal in the world, you know, and you're right underneath a cockroach, you know, as far as they're -- and that's the way they treated you.
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Michael Thornton

Medal of Honor

Thomas Norris: You have to understand that we had a job to do, which we'd been trained very well to do. It was an unusual job, an unconventional job, a highly dangerous job, but you ran your missions because that's what you were sent there to do. And you never thought about, "Gosh, I almost didn't make it back from this one," or "Boy, I was successful on that one," or "We got ambushed on this one and we almost didn't make it out," you know, "Am I going to make it on the next one? Are my people going to make it back?" You don't think about those things. Each mission is an objective that you set out to accomplish and go after. Then you forget about that and you go on to the next one. How did this affect me? If you're asking me how did this affect me after the fact once I was wounded, obviously it changed my whole lifestyle and existence. I wanted to be a -- I mean, I no longer could stay in the Navy. I went into the hospital. I spent from 1972 to 1975 in surgeries. And after that until 1978 in minor surgeries, so I was going back and forth for repair work. The Navy retired me as a result of that, and wouldn't let me stay with the unit. So that part of my life totally changed. I was now -- I mean -- I had the injuries that I had to deal with. But some people look at you and say, "How did you make it through that?" And I think the reason I made it through was because of the type of training that I had way back when we went through basic DDT SEAL training. I mean there's an ingrown desire and determination that you're not going to quit no matter what. And the doctors even came in and said, "We didn't think we were ever going to save you." He said, "I don't know how you made it -- stayed alive and made it through but --" he said, "You just wouldn't give up."
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