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Barry Scheck

Co-Founder, Innocence Project

Clinical education was a pretty important development and I got in at the very beginning in legal education. I was able to start clinical programs -- not just this criminal law clinic, and the Innocence Project was started as a clinical program -- but lots of other clinical programs in the law school. And the reason I say that, is that now there is a lot of talk about creating law schools only two years. I think that's because we need clinics for the second and third years to really enrich the experience. In the first year of law school what we teach students is -- quote -- how to think like a lawyer. Which really means we teach them analytical skills: how to read the cases, how to reason about precedent. And that is important, to at least understand how the court system works in that way, and the justice system works. But what clinical education always was supposed to do is if you had people with analytical abilities, then you can take them to the next level and start dealing with, in some instances, real cases. They could be small cases, it could be a test case, reform litigation. But you would actually look at institutions in an interdisciplinary way to try to solve problems. And you would do fact investigation, which really is quite important to the development of law, because you can have the analytical principles that decide cases, but who created the facts? And how you gather the facts, and how you marshal them and present them, is of enormous importance for lawyers.
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Barry Scheck

Co-Founder, Innocence Project

The clinical movement really changed legal education. Then there was a focus on seeing the client as a person and a greater understanding and engagement in ethical issues. So I think that -- and medicine has always worked like this, right? We have internships and residencies where you are mentored in the context of really treating patients. The clinical movement in American legal education I think has had an enormous impact. And certainly I think that all the work that I have done with my colleagues is not just let's say starting the Innocence Project and getting innocent people out of jail with DNA testing, which is this great scientific advance. But you know, we have -- it's an interdisciplinary approach. So we look at issues of psychology, with eyewitness misidentification and false confessions. And you have to learn something about molecular genetics, and serology, and physics, and pattern evidence, and statistics and probabilities, and all of the science -- cognitive science -- which is changing the world. And it has to be integrated into the law. I think that that's where we have really had our success. I don't think that that would have happened if I hadn't been involved in clinical education, because that's really what clinical education is supposed to be.
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Fritz Scholder

Native American Artist

They were nice enough, but they didn't know what art was. I did finally, accidentally, bump into a "professional artist" -- quotations -- an Indian artist, Oscar Howe -- in Pierre, South Dakota. A full-blooded Sioux, who had gone to Europe because of the war, found out about "modern art" -- quotations -- and it really messed up his mind in a way, but he did come away doing Indian subjects in a cubist style. I realized that art is very serious from him. After he would talk to us -- and he wasn't really a teacher, he just happened to be at the Pierre High School -- he'd have a place in the corner where he'd go and then paint his own paintings. So I would go and just watch, and I saw that it was very serious.
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Robert Schuller

Crystal Cathedral

After my Uncle Henry told me I'd be a preacher, he said to me the next morning, "That means, Robert, that you'll have to go to school for 20 years." I said, "Really?" He said, "Yes, first eight grades, then four years of high school, then four years of college, then three years in seminary. That's about 20 years." I said, "Fine, no problem." And I think what happened there was, I was imbued with the noblest quality of character development a person can receive. And, I say I was imbued with it; I didn't choose it. I didn't know it was being given to me. It was the power of delayed gratification. I set a 20-year goal. It was phenomenal, absolutely phenomenal.
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Robert Schuller

Crystal Cathedral

Robert Schuller: Delayed gratification is more than patience, we now know. I got a psychology course in my undergraduate days, and then I chose to go into theology instead of psychology because I wanted the right to impose my value system on people if I felt their value system was the core of their neuroticism and, it is in many cases. But, the delayed gratification was phenomenal. Then I would -- later on, having accomplished that 20-year goal -- I would now find myself at the age of 23 and I would set a goal of creating a great movement, and build a church. I went to California with a 40-year goal, and they're few people that believe that. Well, now they do because I've spent 41 years there, but again, the power of delayed gratification means patience to wait for the big thing to come along, but you're going to keep working on and never, ever give up.
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