Academy of Achievement Logo
Home
Achiever Gallery
Keys to Success
 Passion
 Vision
   + [ Preparation ]
 Courage
 Perseverance
 Integrity
 The American Dream
Achievement Podcasts
About the Academy
For Teachers

Search the site

Academy Careers

 
 
Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Peyton Manning

Super Bowl Champion Quarterback

Peyton Manning: The cerebral part of the game is the most challenging part of the game. You wouldn't be in the NFL if you didn't have the physical skills. I've spent tons of time, like I said, the workouts as a high school kid, lifting weights, running by yourself. You do that, but you have to do that. The cerebral part is where you can advance yourself and (what you) have to constantly stay on top of. Both of them, really. If you ever stop working out, that is when you get injured, you get behind. But you have to stay so sharp mentally. I think sometimes you can get away with the physical part with being a great athlete. I can overcome that, but the cerebral part, you can't get behind in the mental aspect of the game. Everything happens so fast.
View Interview with Peyton Manning
View Biography of Peyton Manning
View Profile of Peyton Manning
View Photo Gallery of Peyton Manning



Peyton Manning

Super Bowl Champion Quarterback

My dad used to give me a lot of quotes, just cut out of a newspaper article, or out of a quote book, and put them on a bulletin board. One that just kind of hit me at an early age, probably ten years old, it said -- it was by Chuck Noll, a great coach for the Steelers. He said, "Pressure is something that you feel only when you don't know what you're doing," and that just kind of hit me right away. I was playing baseball and basketball at that age. It certainly applies to football today. You don't feel pressure if you study the game plan and know what to do. School work? The same way. If you know what to do, if you put the time in and study, you really shouldn't feel pressure. Now, you might not ace every test or complete every pass, but you don't feel pressure. Pressure is no fun to perform or to execute that way. So that was kind of my theme as a young kid, and I worked hard in school.
View Interview with Peyton Manning
View Biography of Peyton Manning
View Profile of Peyton Manning
View Photo Gallery of Peyton Manning



Peyton Manning

Super Bowl Champion Quarterback

Peyton Manning: Probably the toughest decision I had to make at that time. That was the thing, because I had my degree. That was the tough thing. "Well, I'm not going to graduate," I'd say. "I'm going back to school." I just thought a lot about it. I prayed a lot about it. I sought a lot of advice from my dad. My dad got me some phone numbers of some guys that I wanted to call, some other athletes that had been in that situation, some that stayed, some that went, and talked about, "Hey, I regretted it," or "No, I did the right thing, I left early." So I formed kind of a pros and cons list. I like to write things down. I'm kind of a note-taker. I think writing things down creates that blueprint that guides you through the ups and downs of life, and I just made my decision. As soon as I make it, the one thing I do believe, I think it's up to you to make it the right decision after you make it. To say, "I made the right decision," right when you make it, how do you really know? You don't even ask that question. You say, "I'm going to make it the right decision," by going out and doing it and working hard and not looking back and not second-guessing yourself.
View Interview with Peyton Manning
View Biography of Peyton Manning
View Profile of Peyton Manning
View Photo Gallery of Peyton Manning



Wynton Marsalis

Pulitzer Prize for Music

Wynton Marsalis: I was good, man. I made A's because I was studying because I always read all these books about the slaves, and people didn't want the slaves to get education. Also, my mother is very educated, she's smart. And my father, he would always talk to us like we were grown men, just in the content of his conversations. We never knew what he was talking about half the time. We'd just go, "Yeah, yeah, okay." Like you could ask daddy just something basic, "Daddy can I have a dollar?" And he would go into like a discussion! I believed in studying just because I knew that education was a privilege. And, it wasn't so much necessarily the information that you were studying, but just the discipline of study, to get into the habit of doing something that you don't want to do, to receive the information, and then eventually you start to like it. I always liked to read. My mother would make sure that we read. So, I would read a lot of books, and I would do good in school mainly because I hated to do bad.
View Interview with Wynton Marsalis
View Biography of Wynton Marsalis
View Profile of Wynton Marsalis
View Photo Gallery of Wynton Marsalis



Barry Marshall

Nobel Prize in Medicine

I'd actually worked this out when I was a student in college, that if I went to a lecture and came out of the lecture thinking, "I don't understand that," it was because it was a bad lecture, and the lecturer didn't know his stuff. Because when I had a good teacher, I would always know exactly what he was talking about and I'd never have to refresh it. I would just understand it. And that's actually something that I've taken into my teaching career, is that if I know the subject and know my stuff, I don't have to get nervous about getting up in front of hundreds of people and giving a lecture, and they'll say it was a good lecture. And so, it's the preparation you put into it, and you have to know your stuff to be able to teach it to others.
View Interview with Barry Marshall
View Biography of Barry Marshall
View Profile of Barry Marshall
View Photo Gallery of Barry Marshall



Barry Marshall

Nobel Prize in Medicine

One of the things that happened with me is that I was interested in computers, even in 1980 with e-mail, but it was really teletypes in those days. Our library had just got a line to the National Library of Medicine. So I came in and started doing literature searches, because I was interested in computers and it was fun for me. But I started trying to track these bacteria. And I found various, very widespread, dispersed references to things in the stomach, which seemed to be related to the bacteria, going back nearly 100 years. So that we could then develop a hypothesis that these bacteria were causing some problem in the stomach, and maybe that was leading to ulcers. And then, instead of having to do 20 years of research checking out all those different angles, the research was done, but it was never connected up. And so, with the literature searching, as it became available, we were able to pick out the research that was already there and put together this coherent pattern, which linked bacteria and ulcers. It didn't happen overnight. We actually thought about it for two years before we were reasonably confident. It was really quite a few years before we were absolutely water-tight.
View Interview with Barry Marshall
View Biography of Barry Marshall
View Profile of Barry Marshall
View Photo Gallery of Barry Marshall



Browse Preparation quotes by achiever last name

Previous Page

          

Next Page