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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Mike Krzyzewski

Collegiate Basketball Champion

In high school, in sport, I had a coach who told me I was much better than I thought I was, and would make me do more in a positive sense. He was the first person who taught me not to be afraid of failure. He'd tell me to shoot 25 times a game, and I'd say, "No, I can't do that, everyone will hate me." "You do it." And even though I didn't do that all the time, he kept pushing me to be better. If success or talent were on floors, maybe I saw myself on the fifth floor. He always saw me on the twentieth floor. As a result, I climbed more floors when I was with him. I've tried to use that in my way of teaching. He even helped me choose West Point to go to school, where I was afraid of that. He felt that that would give me many more floors in my building, and he was right.
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Mike Krzyzewski

Collegiate Basketball Champion

Imagination has a great deal to do with winning. In my case, and I try to tell kids -- I teach at summer camp -- to imagine yourself. But it's your imagination. Why would you lose in your imagination? Why would you not achieve really neat things in your imagination? Why would you let someone else do your imagination for you? So in all these games that I would fantasize, I always won, and I always played well. Therefore, as a player, as a coach, even though we might have lost in a season or not won a championship, it was like a self-fulfilling prophecy that I'm going to win some time. I've never felt myself a loser. I never let a defeat determine what I think of myself. I think that I win. I don't all the time, but if I play long enough, I'm going to be a winner. I believe wholeheartedly that that came about because of imagination when I was younger.
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Charles Kuralt

A Life On the Road

Charles Kuralt: I had a little insight into life that most kids growing up in small town North Carolina probably didn't have. My mother was a school teacher, and a good role model for me. But, my father was the real one. He was a social worker and, for years, head of the social services department in my home town. And so, through his eyes I saw the underside of society. I saw how many people were poor and how many kids my age went to school hungry in the morning, which I don't think most of my contemporaries in racially segregated schools in the South thought very much about at the time. I think that was an advantage for me. I knew a little bit more about real life than most kids did, I think. And then, the storytelling tradition that you bring from the South, I don't know where it arose, but it's still there. You can't go to the feed store or the country courthouse on a Saturday afternoon without running into storytellers. And, I had some favorites. I was charmed to sit and listen. And my father, who was a New Englander and a little more reticent, not a great storyteller himself, also was charmed. And so, he and I would stand around and listen to these old guys tell whoppers. And, I think that appreciation for stories probably helped me.
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Charles Kuralt

A Life On the Road

I believe that writing is derivative. I mean, I think good writing comes from good reading. And, I think that writers, when they sit down to write hear in their heads the rhythms of good writers they have read. Sometimes, I could even tell you which writer's rhythms I am imitating. It's not exactly plagiarism, but it's just experience. It's falling in love with good language and trying to imitate it.
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Eric Lander

Founding Director, Broad Institute

Eric Lander: I actually started out teaching when I was in high school. Stuyvesant (High School) had a math team, and one of the responsibilities being the captain of the math team was to teach, every morning, five days a week, for an hour, to all the other people on the math team. So by age 14 or 15 I was teaching. When I was in college -- actually when I was a senior in high school -- I took a summer National Science Foundation Math Program, which was a wonderful program. I went back to teach in that for four summers after that, and that was a wonderful experience. I taught six days a week, six hours a day, for six weeks. When you teach like that, you can't prepare lesson plans. You've got to know what you're doing and go with the flow. I loved it, because the students were some of the best high school math students in the country, and you'd start off teaching a course on something, but halfway through the students would say, "We'd rather study something else." In fact, we gave a problem set one night, and the students got so enthusiastic about it that at 11 o'clock, when they were all going home, they said, "Why don't we instead make the course on this?" And they full well expected that tomorrow morning we would have the course switched over to that, and so we did. So in fact, by the time I got around to teaching as a professional, as a professor, I had had hundreds of hours of teaching under my belt, and I'm so grateful for that, because I think the experiences of teaching in those ways, teaching where you have to go with the flow, is something that young professors, young teachers, don't get enough of. When I look at graduate students today, I find that they get a couple of hours TA-ing -- teaching assistants -- in a course. And how in the world can you learn the really complicated business of teaching without a tremendous amount of trial and error, and just experience?
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Eric Lander

Founding Director, Broad Institute

I sat in on a biology course. I took the laboratory component of it, freaking out the poor graduate student who has this business school professor sitting in on his course. But he was kind enough to take me back to his lab and introduce me to his own advisor, and Peter and Lucy Cherbas gave me a bench in their laboratory and taught me how to clone genes. So I moonlighted cloning genes in their lab for a couple of years, figuring that genetics was the most rigorous place to start, figuring I'd work my way back up to the brain. That's how I became a biologist. I became a biologist very much through that suggestion of my brother's, and through this lucky series of accidents, and stumbling upon people who were kind enough to take me, and then picking up biology on street corners -- admittedly very good street corners -- in Cambridge, Massachusetts. But largely, most of my biology education came while I was teaching as professor of managerial economics at Harvard Business School.
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Eric Lander

Founding Director, Broad Institute

The way it shook out, by 1988 or so, was here I had this training in genetics. I had training in mathematics that was turning out to be tremendously important for all this genome stuff. I had a background in business, from having taught at a business school, at a time that biology was organizing its first large scale project that required organizational thinking. And I had a bunch of experience from journalism writing, at a time when expressing what this project was about and formulating it was tremendously important. So I suddenly had a recipe for a whole bunch of skills here that fell together, and I'd love to take credit for having planned it that way, but it wasn't that way at all. It was completely by accident. And I found, within a year or so after that, I had an offer of tenured positions teaching at both Harvard and MIT in biology. A year after that, I launched one of the first Human Genome Centers in the United States. A year or two after that, I helped co-found a biopharmaceutical firm, and onward like that, but it was very much an accident. Even as recently as two years ago, when I got elected to the National Academy of Sciences, around age 40 or so, I found myself rather surprised and stunned to be taken seriously at all this stuff. Because I still viewed myself -- as I still sort of do view myself -- as an accidental interloper in all this, who just stumbled upon this field, but a very lucky field to stumble upon, and some very wonderful people to guide me along the way.
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