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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Hank Aaron

Home Run King

When you talk about the Negro League, it was a feeding ground for the major leagues. I don't know that I would have been in the big leagues if I had not had the experience of playing in the Negro League. Some people say, "Well, what class of ball would you put it at?" And I would say that the Negro League probably was, I would say a high A ball. I had the experience of playing in that league for -- I don't know -- a couple of months. But so many other players -- Ernie Banks played there, and he went from there to the major leagues. Gene Baker did the same thing. Jackie Robinson I think stayed in the minor leagues for a year-and-a-half. Campanella, Don Newcombe, all these guys came through that league to get to the big leagues. And they were polished. They knew how to play the game. I knew, I learned an awful lot from playing in that league, simply because of the fact I played with the older players, players that knew how to play the game, and all of those things rubbed off on me. I knew exactly what I wanted to do, and how I did, when the situation came about.
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Hank Aaron

Home Run King

Hank Aaron: I don't know that it was a secret. I just concentrate on everything I had to do. Baseball was my livelihood. I thought about it, I studied it. I practiced as much as I possibly could. Where some players practice during the day, during the game, I practiced all -- I would go out and do things that they would never dream about doing. And I can tell you what pitchers -- in what situation they want to throw a certain pitch to me. So I knew that. And I knew it only because I studied the pitchers a little bit more than just the average did.
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Hank Aaron

Home Run King

My father always taught me, if you want something bad enough, you've got to learn how to go out and do something special in order to accomplish and get it. I just felt that I had the ability to play baseball, that was given to me by God, but I had to apply my own intuition into it in order to make myself a little bit better. In order for me to do that, then I had to do some things that ordinarily another player would not do. I had to make sure that if a pitcher was out there on the mound, that I knew exactly what his weakness was, because he had already studied mine. I felt like I need to be ahead of him at all times, and that's what happened.
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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Basketball Scoring Champion

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: The first day that you go to play for Coach Wooden, he tells you about how to put your socks on. And the reason he does that is because his system requires that you do everything on the run. You don't jog through things, you have to run full speed. The wear and tear on your feet is immediate and intense, and if your socks aren't on right, if you have like a ridge that you're running over in your sock, you're going to get a blister and then you won't be able to practice, and if you don't practice for Coach Wooden, you don't play. So he was telling everybody how to survive his system and get through it without coming up with blisters on their feet.
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Edward Albee

"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?"

Edward Albee: I don't rewrite. Well, not much. I think I probably do all the rewriting that I'm going to do before I'm aware that I'm writing the play because obviously, the creativity resists -- resides -- in the unconscious, right? Probably resists the unconscious, too -- resides in the unconscious. My plays, I think, are pretty much determined before I become aware of them. I think they formulated there, and then they move into the conscious mind, and then onto the page. By the time I'm willing to commit a play to paper, I pretty much know -- or can trust -- the characters to write the play for me. So, I don't impose. I let them have their heads and say and do what they want, and it turns out to be a play.
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