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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Shinya Yamanaka

Embryonic Stem Cell Research

Shinya Yamanaka: I was an orthopedic surgeon, and my first failure was that I was not good at doing surgery, and that failure gave me an opportunity to move to basic science. Then my first major was pharmacology, and in pharmacology we only use many inhibitors and stimulators, all just drugs. And any drug cannot be 100 percent specific and 100 percent effective. So although I did many, many experiments, I did not obtain the answer, because the drugs I used weren't specific enough. So that was kind of my second failure in my career. But that second failure got me interested in knockout mice, mouse technology. So I think failure is important in my career.
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Shinya Yamanaka

Embryonic Stem Cell Research

Shinya Yamanaka: Usually to find a job in the States -- from Japan -- usually you have to ask your professor in Japan to recommend some place. But unfortunately, at that time, my professor -- my mentor in Japan -- did not know any labs working on knockout mice. So I did not get any good recommendations. So I had to apply for many positions, which I learned from scientific journals such as Nature and Science. I applied to -- I forget -- like 20 or 30 different universities and laboratories in the States. And UCSF -- University of California at San Francisco -- was the first to give me an opportunity. That was why I ended up coming to San Francisco.
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Shinya Yamanaka

Embryonic Stem Cell Research

Shinya Yamanaka: I really had hard times, so I was about to quit doing science. I was about to go back to clinics, but again, I was lucky to find another position, in Nara. Nara is very close to Osaka. It's only one hour by car. There's another university in Nara, and I was lucky enough to find a position as an associate professor over there. The funding was much better, and the scientific atmosphere was much better over there. That means there are many, many good scientists in that university in Nara. So without that promotion, probably I [would have] quit my scientific career.
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Chuck Yeager

First Man to Break the Sound Barrier

Chuck Yeager: The X-1, to me, was a sort of a "fly twice a week" airplane. It took two or three days to reduce the data from your flight. It was a complex airplane that gets serviced with liquid oxygen and alcohol and gaseous nitrogen. And in the meantime, I'm flying about 15 other airplanes every day, on different test programs, so it was a hard grind. The X-1 was a pleasure to fly, because you took the whole day to do it. That particular flight, I think was on a Tuesday. On the weekends, there at Muroc, as it was called then, we used to go out to Pancho Barnes's. She had a rodeo grounds, swimming pool, motel and a good restaurant. You'd go out there and unwind. And I took Glennis out there, I think, on a Saturday night. We loved to ride horses, so we went out after dinner and were riding horses and chasing each other. Coming back, somebody closed a gate, it was dark and I didn't see it, so my horse hit the fence and flipped me, and I broke a couple of ribs. And that was on a Saturday night. Sunday I moped around, and then Monday, I had to go into the base and I went to a local doctor there, and he said, "You've got two busted ribs. I'll tape you up." And it really didn't make that much difference in flying the airplane, because it's not strenuous other than handling it with your hands and feet on the rudder pedals and the control surfaces and the loading pressure domes and turning switches on, and things like that. So my only problem was, it was painful to get into the airplane, because you had to come down a ladder and go through a little hole on the right side. But then the hard part was closing the door once old Jack Ridley came down the ladder and held the door against the right side. You had a lever. It took both hands all you could do it. I couldn't handle it with my right side, so he made me about a ten-inch long broom stick that I could stick in the end of the door handle to give me that mechanical advantage. That's the way we solved the problem. So that really didn't make much difference.
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Chuck Yeager

First Man to Break the Sound Barrier

I didn't go straight back to my squadron when I got to Spain. I was held in sort of a secure house, where you couldn't get out, until they interrogated you to make sure you were an American flyer. You know, they wanted your whole story. Where you got shot down, the outfit that you were with, and then they brought a pilot down from my squadron to identify me, and to make sure that I was who I said I was. Then they started publishing orders on me to go back to the United States. That's when I sort of backed off and said, "I don't want to go home, I want to go back to my squadron and fight." And they said, "You can't because the rules prohibit it." Fortunately, the invasion was just coming along, and when the invasion occurred, the resistance forces surfaced, and General Eisenhower, whom I had worked my way all the way up to see, said, "Okay, go back."
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Andrew Young

Civil Rights Ambassador

In 1963, in Birmingham, as soon as we got there, I said to Dr. King, "I want to go meet with some of the business leaders." He said, "How are you going to do that?" And it turned out that while at this conference that I'd been to in Camp Mack, one of the people there was from the Episcopal Church in Alabama. She was the diocesan youth director. So I called her and asked her would she set up a meeting between Dr. King and the bishop. And she said, "Well, I don't know Dr. King, but I know you. And if you will come and see the bishop, you can then set up the meeting between Dr. King and the bishop." And Bishop Murray then was new, but he agreed with me that the Episcopal Church House would be a good place to have negotiations between the business and the Civil Rights Movement. So all of this was what led up to the March on Washington. Birmingham was -- desegregation day was May the 5th. Students whom we had trained just walked out of schools and walked downtown. We'd had a boycott on, not buying anything but food or medicines for 90 days. I think almost 5,000 high school students marched downtown and were arrested. There were so many of them they put them in the stadium where they have the Iron Bowl.
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Andrew Young

Civil Rights Ambassador

Andrew Young: Well actually, the March on Washington grew out of the demonstrations in Alabama in 1963, in May, that these 5,000 students from about four or five different high schools really shut down the town, the economy. They had all read Gandhi, and they'd read about Gandhi's salt march to the sea. So under Fred Shuttlesworth's leadership, and James Bevel's leadership, Bevel had organized the students for the massive jail-in. All of this was replicating what Gandhi had done in India. So they saw the salt march to the sea, that Gandhi's protests against the British, the counterpart of that would be a March on Washington. When they started, they were talking about, "No, we just get out on the highway and walk down Highway 11 and we'll get there when we get there. We'll eat along the way and we'll demonstrate along the way." And that was kind of organized chaos. And A. Phillip Randolph called Dr. King and said, "Look, I hear you're thinking about a March on Washington. We've been trying to organize one since Franklin Roosevelt's time. Why don't we work together? So Dr. Randolph of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, and Bayard Rustin convened a meeting of the six civil rights organizations. And they then planned this March on Washington.
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Andrew Young

Civil Rights Ambassador

I had followed the experts and put the money I had in television. The second time around I spent almost no money on television. The only money I spent on television, I spent on Ted Turner's station, late at night on something called Creature Feature and wrestling. Because those were things that I knew people looked at. But we spent most of our money organizing people door-to-door. Times had changed, and I was able to -- it was a pouring down rain -- but we were so well organized that we got a 74 percent turnout of black voters, and we got almost 14 percent of the white vote. I saw the headline that somebody sent me from a paper, and the headline on the paper said, "White Voters Elect Young." And that was true, because we couldn't have done it with just black voters, when I think at that time the district was just 32 percent black. So I did have the time to get known throughout the white community, and I ran a better campaign.
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