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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Quincy Jones

Music Impresario

I used to go in a little closet, a little tiny closet that had four barrels with some two-by-fours and a workbench on it, and just sit there and just turn the world off every time the pain came in and go inside and just -- since I was very young -- just to take all the negative things and the painful things and take that and convert it into something beautiful and positive. So, I could feel that if I turned it on myself, in toward bitterness, it would kill me, it would take me out like it did my brother.
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Quincy Jones

Music Impresario

I finally got a job when I was 11; this guy named Roscoe asked me to press clothes. You know, I was some nice cheap labor there. And, I had a little raggedy bike and so after I pressed and did a pretty good job, he says, "Well, you know, why don't you take them to be cleaned now and you can fill out the bills and put the paper sack over it and deliver them." At 11 years old I was running that whole business for him, and I was proud of that and I was happy that I was capable of being responsible for something and useful.
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Quincy Jones

Music Impresario

We were in the National Guard band, which was an all black unit, which was funny, because Bumps Blackwell, who had the pop band we were in, he was the commanding officer, and we'd go out to Fort Lewis for about three months in the summer time with the band. And, we were master sergeants and all that stuff, and staff sergeants because we were musicians, definitely not because we were soldiers, because we didn't really get that at all. You know, marching and the discipline of what the military thing was about, because we -- it wasn't real because we were National Guard. We were young kids in the National Guard. We put our ages up. We were 14 years old.
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Quincy Jones

Music Impresario

We made $17 a night. You have to learn how to do that, too. And they had wash and wear shirts to carry in the sax case. I got one of those. And when they'd get in a hotel, we'd go to Father Divine's for 15 cents, you know, have the stool and stuff and say "Peace," when you go in the door. You'd fold up your pants and put them underneath the mattress. We couldn't afford to get them pressed. And you'd put your coat in the bathroom, turn the steam on, hang your wash and wear shirt there. Wash your handkerchief, put it on the mirror, and the next morning it's dry and you pull it off and it's already pressed, you know. And so I learned all these things from the guys that had been out there and I just watched. I really paid attention to what was going on, one thing leads to another and you grow.
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Quincy Jones

Music Impresario

I moved to Paris in 1957 to study with Nadia Boulanger, and to work for a record company called Barclay Records. That was an incredible experience. I went back in 1959, did a Broadway show and had a whole big band to play with the show. I was supposed to eventually pick Sammy Davis, Jr. up in London and come back to Broadway. My band was featured in the show with costumes and parts, and plans didn't go that way. So, we got stranded in Europe for ten months after the show closed, which is the closest I ever came to suicide. And, we finally came home. I hocked everything I had in my publishing companies and got the band and all 30 people back home.
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Naomi Judd

Country Music Artist and Social Advocate

We didn't have a bio. We didn't have an eight-by-ten. We didn't have -- zero, zip, zilch. You talk about falling off the turnip truck! I love it, because that gives people hope, because that's what we're all about is saying that, "You know, technology is cool, it's all great, and the information highway and all that stuff, but you know what? Give me that human touch. Give me that one-on-one."
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Naomi Judd

Country Music Artist and Social Advocate

It began when I was 17, and I had started my senior year of high school and I found out I'm pregnant, and my family is exploding into chaos, and my little brother is dying, and my parents are getting a divorce. I mean, I'm PG in 1963 in small town America. Big scandal! It was awful. And that was the night that I grew up, because I realized as I sat there and told my family doctor that I thought I was pregnant, he began to weep, and I remember sitting there in my chair, and it dawned on me for the first time in my young life that change is the true nature of this world. And I got up out of my seat and walked behind his desk and put my hand on his starched white lab coat and said, "It's okay. I don't have anything else, but I have hope."
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Hamid Karzai

Former President of Afghanistan

I told the French, I told the U.S., I told the Europeans that this somebody called Osama -- and people coming to me -- common Afghans came to tell me that the Taliban are bringing in horrible people from the Arab world, from Pakistan, and these are killers. "These are very inhuman people. Talk to the rest of the world. Liberate Afghanistan from these people, because they are going to hurt everybody, not only Afghans." And I went on a daily basis, I went to the rest of the world to tell them that this is what's going on in Afghanistan. I hardly stayed two or three days a week in my home with my family, and later on when I got married with my wife. I kept telling them. Nobody believed me. When they believed me they thought, "Well, it may not be as serious as he's talking about." Or if it is as serious as he's talking about, maybe his estimation of the Afghan resolve to get rid of the Taliban and terrorism was something that they thought I was overstating. So all those things probably made things a bit difficult.
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Hamid Karzai

Former President of Afghanistan

Osama Bin Laden had just arrived in Afghanistan at that time. I had just heard his name at that time. Somebody in Afghanistan, a pilot, told me that he flew this man from a certain border of Afghanistan to Kandahar to meet with Mullah Omar with two sacks of money in his hands, briefcases of money. But the Taliban were banning people from education, banning women from work. The world did not know them the way he knew them at the time. The world was still sympathetic to them, the West in particular. I began to disassociate with them. I began to travel to America. I began to travel to Europe to tell the Europeans and the Americans that Afghanistan is going through very difficult times; that there is a danger in Afghanistan for Afghans and for the rest of the world. Very few people believed me. They said, "This is not true. You are saying this because they are not the type of people you are. They represent Afghanistan; you represent another culture. You speak English, you are educated, so you don't represent Afghanistan. The Taliban do represent Afghanistan." We began in Afghanistan a campaign against them, a campaign to dislodge them, without help from the rest of the world.
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