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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Ron Howard

Oscar for Best Director

As a young person, a young adult trying to make the transition from sitcom actor to motion picture director, I was getting an awful lot of patronizing kind of pats on the head. And, "Hey, hang in there." And, you know, "In another ten or 15 years, I'm sure somebody will give you a chance to direct." And that's not what I wanted to hear at all. I had a lot of frustration about that, and I earned my way out by making student films myself, by writing, and by getting myself into a position with some leverage by being one of the lead actors on Happy Days . I had something I could sort of trade with.
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Ron Howard

Oscar for Best Director

My first movie was a car chase comedy -- young people on the run -- called Grand Theft Auto . And made for $602,000, but the film made a terrific profit and it got me started. I wrote it with my father, and I had to star in it in order to get to direct it. But that's the last time that I acted in anything that I directed. Well, I actually had to do a scene in the next film that I directed, but I didn't like it and I cut the scene out. And the executives in charge of the project, fortunately, liked the movie well enough that they accepted the fact that I cut myself out of the movie. That was the last time that I acted in anything that I've directed.
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Louis Ignarro

Nobel Prize in Medicine

When we had our first hypothesis that nitric oxide lowers the blood pressure, and does this and that, and was the active species of nitroglycerin, I wrote a grant, a large research grant to further investigate the pharmacology of this noxious, poisonous gas. And it was the first grant that was turned down. It was totally refused. I didn't get it. Okay. But I published some of that work anyway. And then a couple of other people reproduced that work and extended it. Then I went back and applied for that grant, and I got it funded. Okay. So that was good. Then, when I had the idea that our bodies may make nitric oxide, that grant was turned down. My first publication was turned down because I was thinking outside the box. No one thought it possible. How could our bodies make this poisonous gas? That's ridiculous. We would all die if our bodies made it. On and on and on. One thing led to another, the paper got published, and then I raised more funds than I knew what to do with. And Alfred Nobel came through. So there!
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Louis Ignarro

Nobel Prize in Medicine

You have to really believe that what you're doing is correct and don't let anything stand in your way to get there. I learned this. It's a very popular phrase, "Never give up." I learned that in sports, because I was never a very big person, but I loved baseball and football, and I played that throughout grade school and high school, and and a little bit in college, but not much. Columbia didn't have much of a baseball or football team. But I did play sports, and track and field of course, when I was much younger. And it was always a struggle for me, because of my smaller size than the others, but I never gave up. I just had to work harder, run harder, cut corners harder, but never, never gave up and was pretty good at it. So I applied the same principles when I was a scientist. As a scientist you have to adapt that thinking. Never give up, because as soon as you give up, it's over. You can never give up. If you really believe in something, you've got to pursue it until you've convinced yourself with experimentation, "Okay, you had a great idea, but it's just not going to work. It's not true." And that's happened to me. Now most have worked. So that's good. But I've had some ideas which I thought were perfect and they were not.
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Louis Ignarro

Nobel Prize in Medicine

Louis Ignarro: The one thing about research being very exciting is the fact that you really don't know what to expect. So you have to be very creative. You have to be able to ask the right questions and then answer them in a timely manner. And then, once you get answers back, you need to know what direction you're going to go next. It sounds very exciting, but it can be very frustrating because, for example, in the laboratory when you're conducting experiments, not all experiments work, or they don't work the way you thought they were going to work. So now what do you do? Research carries with it a great deal of frustration. There's no instant gratification in research. You do an experiment, okay, fine. Now you're taking it this direction, you're taking it in that direction. You may not know if your project has been successful, or if you've made an important finding, for a year or two or three years. So that's what I mean by "no instant gratification" in most aspects. Sometimes there have been experiments where there was that instant gratification. But at the beginning, it's very frustrating. It takes many, many hours. Doing original research in a laboratory does not mean that you go in at 8:00 in the morning and you go home at 5:00 in the afternoon and you take weekends off. Sorry. That's not the way it works. You may be going at 6:00 in the morning. You may be staying until midnight. I've always worked on weekends, at least the first 20 years of my career. And depending on the experiment, sometimes you have to stay awake for 24 to 48 hours, depending upon what you're doing to monitor the experiments.
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Daniel Inouye

Medal of Honor

Daniel Inouye: I was an officer then, first lieutenant, and about a week before this attack, we had an officers' meeting and the captain says, "I want you to pledge silence. You're not going to tell anyone what transpires in this room." Okay. His words were very simple: "The war is over." I looked at him. "What do you mean, the war is over? They're still shooting!" "They're now negotiating. So be careful, keep up the pressure, because you don't want to prolong the war. You want to end it fast, so put the pressure on, but be careful." Well at that point, you don't want your men to be wounded, so keeping that in mind, moving up. On that day was I wounded a couple of times. The first one I thought somebody punched me in the stomach, but no one was around. A bullet had gone through my abdomen. Believe it or not, it just felt like a punch, but there's no pain nerves inside. The pain nerve's on your surface. It is much more painful if somebody stepped on your toe. So I kept on going. The bleeding was very minor. It wasn't fatal at that point. Then we were confronted by three machine gun nests.
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Daniel Inouye

Medal of Honor

Daniel Inouye: I had gone to the Draft Board to say, "I want to sign up," and they said, "No, you are 4-C." I had no idea what 4-C was, though. So I had to inquire, "What is a 4-C?" "You're enemy." Ho! To be told by a fellow American that you're an enemy, that's stunning. I could never forget that. I was just 18 at that time. And like most young men I wanted to serve my country. Put on a uniform and do our business. Well, about three weeks after the bombing we got word that we of Japanese ancestry, were declared to be 4-C. 1-A is physically fit and mentally alert. 4-F is, something's wrong with you physically or mentally. 4-C is the designation for "enemy alien." I was made an enemy, and as a result, I was not qualified to put on the uniform. So I couldn't be drafted, I couldn't volunteer. So we got together, Japanese Americans, and began petitioning the President to say, "Look, give us an opportunity to show our stuff." And in December of 1942 a decision was made, was announced in January, that they'll take volunteers to form a Japanese American regiment. And 85 percent of those in Hawaii who were qualified volunteered. Pretty good. To make a long story short, I got in at 18. I was second to the last to get in, because I was exempted, 'cause I was in the Aid Station, and I was in college as a pre-med. Doctors and pre-meds were set aside as essential, and those of us in the Aid Station were considered essential. So I quit school, I quit my job, and I went back and I said, "I'm ready." So I got in. I was one of the youngest in the regiment. I got a commission. I was too young, but they gave me a commission when I was 20. But at the age of 19 I was a platoon leader.
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