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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Vince Gill

Country Music Hall of Fame

One of the guys in the band was a guy named Tony Brown, who also used to play with Elvis. He was a piano player, and he played with Rodney and Rosanne, and he was also an A&R guy for RCA Records in Nashville. He said, "Man, you need to start making country records!" And so he signed me to RCA in 1983, and I made my first record and not much happened. I made my second record and not much happened. I made my third record and not much happened. And then I got another chance. I moved over to MCA Records a few years later and got another opportunity. You know, I really am grateful for the years of struggle in looking back. I think at the time it was hard, because you feel like you're beating your head against the walls, saying, "Why isn't this working?" You know? Well, maybe if you go around the wall you know, so I found some way to go around the wall. In hindsight, I think all those years of struggle was a humbling experience.
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Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court

When I applied for law firm jobs, Columbia had an excellent placement office, but sign up sheets would go up and many would say, "Men only." I had, as I have sometimes explained, three strikes that put me out when it came to employment as a lawyer. One is I am Jewish, and the law firms were just beginning to stop discriminating on the basis of religion. That affected Catholics as well as Jews. They were opening up to all people without regard to religion. And some, a precious few, were ready to try a woman, but none were willing to take a chance on a mother, and my daughter was four years old when I graduated from law school. So of course I was disappointed, but it wasn't unexpected.
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Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: I had a great deal of support from my faculty colleagues. None of them were resentful. Most of them were so secure about themselves and the excellence of the Columbia faculty, their idea was that if Columbia decided to engage me to be a tenured professor then I must be really good. And even if I were doing things that they didn't, that they would disagree with, they were backing me up. One example: I was named the law school's representative on the university senate. Women who were teaching in the university had a suspicion that they were not getting equal pay, so the start to finding out if that suspicion was right was finding out just what salaries the university was paying. And the administration's answer was, "That's secret information. All kinds of jealousies would result if we published them." And of course, you couldn't find out if Columbia was meeting its equal pay obligations without that information, which we eventually got and the suspicions proved right.
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Rudolph Giuliani

Former Mayor of New York City

The first time I ran, I lost by two percent, and the second time I ran, I won by two percent, and then I got reelected by a much larger number. But maybe the fact that so many people told me it couldn't be done challenged me. I'd go talk to people about, "Should I run for mayor?" and they would tell me, "You're crazy. You can't. You're a Republican. A Republican can't get elected. Being a mayor is a thankless job. The city's unmanageable, the city's ungovernable." Even books were written with those titles, "New York City is Ungovernable," "New York City is Unmanageable." Maybe there's something about my personality, but the more people told me that, the more I wanted to do it. It didn't make sense to me that the city was unmanageable or ungovernable. Nothing is unmanageable or ungovernable.
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Rudolph Giuliani

Former Mayor of New York City

Rudolph Giuliani: Well, I very much subscribe to the "Broken Windows" theory, a theory that was developed by Professors Wilson and Kelling, 25 years ago maybe. The idea of it is that you had to pay attention to small things, otherwise they would get out of control and become much worse. And that, in fact, in a lot of our approach to crime, quality of life, social programs, we were allowing small things to get worse rather than dealing with them at the earliest possible stage. That approach had been tried in other cities, but all small cities, and there was a big debate about whether it could work in a city as large as New York. One of the ways that New York used to resist any kind of change was to say, "It can't work here," because they wanted to keep the status quo. There is such a desire for people to do that, to keep the status quo. And I thought, "Well, there's no reason why it can't work in New York City. We have bigger resources. We may have bigger problems, we have bigger resources, the same theory should work." So we started paying attention to the things that were being ignored. Aggressive panhandling, the squeegee operators that would come up to your car and wash the window of your car whether you wanted it or not -- and sometimes smashed people's cars or tires or windows -- the street-level drug-dealing; the prostitution; the graffiti, all these things that were deteriorating the city. So we said, "We're going to pay attention to that," and it worked. It worked because we not only got a big reduction in that, and an improvement in the quality of life, but massive reductions in homicide, and New York City turned from the crime capital of America to the safest large city in the country for five, six years in a row.
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