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Suzanne Farrell

Ballerina Extraordinaire

Some mornings you would wake up and say, oh boy, I really don't feel like going to class. I don't want to dance. I mean, I got depressed. I didn't always want to dance every day of my life. But somehow I knew that I had to get myself to the theater to study, to take class, because I think better when I am in the environment that I have spent most of my life. And I always thought better when I was working, thought clearer when I was working. And so, no matter how much I didn't want to go to the theater when I seemingly woke up in the morning, I always said, well, go and see how you feel. And usually by the time I started moving around and dancing, I would feel good. Some of the mornings that I felt the worst, were the days that I would have the best performances. So you just never know what the day has in store for you. So you always have to be optimistic and say, go and see what happens. Or live this moment as it comes.
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Suzanne Farrell

Ballerina Extraordinaire

I had felt that I sort of had the rug pulled out from underneath me by my hip, and that I also knew that I would be better if I had a goal to reach. I didn't care really, whether I ever got out onstage again, I only knew that I had to try. That I would be unhappy, I would be unhappy if I didn't try, but I would not be unhappy if I tried and failed. And so, that was my impetus to get out on stage again and to dance again, was to see, was to have a goal.
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Sally Field

Two Oscars for Best Actress

I went on the audition -- auditioned. I'd never been I mean I didn't know what do to. I came back, I came back, I came back, I came back, I came back, I came back, which seemed like forever. And at the end of the summer, I was doing a television series called Gidget. Yeah, and I was 17. So bam! You know, just into it, just flop into the world!
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Sally Field

Two Oscars for Best Actress

Sally Field: It was a stigma. I mean television was thought of as, you know, the poor relation to film. And there is still a little of that. There's still a little of that. It's a little snobbery, a class system that existed. But in 1960, you know, late '60s, early '70s it was impossible, especially if you came for something called The Flying Nun. It was impossible to make that transition. It just couldn't be done. It wasn't that I couldn't get the part, I couldn't get in the door. I couldn't get on the list. Most especially because I was the Flying Nun. It was an important journey to change that. It made me learn some really valuable lessons, and that is that if I wasn't where I wanted to be, it was because I wasn't good enough, period. Period. It wasn't because they weren't letting me in the door. It wasn't because they were against me, or they thought I was something else, or, "They, they, they." It was simply because I wasn't good enough. That the minute I gave my power away to them I was lost. And I didn't try to get in the door. I didn't try.
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Sally Field

Two Oscars for Best Actress

You know, I barely had an agent who cared whether I lived or died. And what was bizarre is that that's how it happened. That I'd worked so hard at the Actor's Studio, that I started to get this kind of little underground reputation. It was also during this incredible time in American film in the '70s when American film was changing. And at the Actor's Studio was Ellen Burstyn and Jack Nicholson and things were changing. And I got in on an audition, not because of my agent, but because of someone who had worked with me at the Actor's Studio and told someone that people thought they knew who I was, but I wasn't that. And I came in on the audition. By then I knew how to audition. I knew that I couldn't come in as Sally Field, this still rather unsophisticated person. I had to come in as the character. It was for a film called Stay Hungry. Bob Rafelson, a wonderful director certainly, at a really important time in American film. I had to come and convince him that I was this absolute floozy, this tart, this sleep-around kind of girl -- uneducated, Southern, sleep-around little floozy girl. And I was uneducated, but I wasn't any of the other things, but I knew how to be that character. I knew how to play the role. I also knew that an audition starts from the moment I started to get dressed and leave the house, and that the acting had to be that he had to then believe that everything else I'd done to that point, Gidget and The Flying Nun, was an incredible acting job. I mean really I was just this absolute tart.
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Judah Folkman

Cancer Research

There's a fine line between persistence and obstinacy, and you never know when you've crossed it. So mostly, as I observed other scientists and read about them, many of them had given up. Fleming gave up on penicillin. He discovered it in the late '20s, tried to purify it, failed, and wrote in 1932, "I give up." He said, "This will never be useful because it's too unstable." And so it waited until 1941 till Florey and Chaine could figure out how to purify it. All three got the Nobel prize. So had he persisted, he might have had it many years earlier. There are many, many, many examples in science.
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Judah Folkman

Cancer Research

The obstacles mainly were in the very beginning, in the late '60s, when we proposed the idea that tumors need to recruit their own private blood supply. That was met with almost universal hostility and ridicule and disbelief by other scientists. Because the dogma at that time was that tumors did not need to stimulate new blood vessels, they just grew on old ones. And that even if they could, after we showed it, the next disbelief was it didn't make any difference; it was a side effect like pus in a wound. So if you said you were studying wound healing and you found pus, they said you were studying a side effect, it's not important. And then after we showed it was important, which took us about five years (and we said there would be specific signals, molecules that would stimulate this, everyone said -- pathologists, surgeons, basic scientists -- said, "No, that's non-specific inflammation. You're studying dirt." They used to say, "You're studying dirt. There will be no such molecules." And then when we actually proved that there was -- that was now 1983 (starting in the late '60s), we had the first molecule. They said, "Well, but you'll never prove that that's what tumors use." So it was each step.
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Judah Folkman

Cancer Research

The nay-sayers keep coming. There are always nay-sayers. And now they say, "Well, it works in mice, but it won't work in people." So I say, "So what? Should we not test? Should I stop because you know for sure?" And people come up, stand up at meetings, "I'm very perturbed. It cannot work in people, must not work in people. This only works in mice." So I do two things. I say, "Will you sign?" I have a little book that I carry. I say, "Will you sign for me? Because you're so sure, I can just publish your remarks directly and save a lot of government and taxpayers' money, and we won't do the experiments. We won't test in humans. We'll just say it won't work." And then you get this body reaction. And then I also have -- there's a slide that I have for occasional -- I don't get this so much any more, but the slide is the New York Times, and it's 1903, and it's two Harvard professors, on the front page, have shown the exact mathematics of physics -- these professors of physics -- of why it is impossible for man to fly, because you can't build a motor that could lift its own weight. And three months later they took off at Kitty Hawk, or four months, something like that.
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