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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


J. Carter Brown

Director Emeritus
National Gallery of Art

J. Carter Brown: Oh, I was hopeless. I was very unathletic, and when I was in school I was two years younger than everybody in my class, so I got beaten up all the time, and I got laughed at for being interested in studying and doing stupid things like that. And, it's been so rewarding. I'm going to my 50th anniversary of my high school, and so rewarding that now they feel I'm the guy that sort of "made it" in the class, having been the Class Joke. Never completely "joke," because I was president of the Dramatic Society, and I did manage to graduate first in my class, but that wasn't the value system of that particular group of boys. They had an undefeated football season. They were really good at athletics, and the atmosphere at school was pretty anti-intellectual in those days.
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J. Carter Brown

Director Emeritus
National Gallery of Art

Talking of ocean racing, one of the best lessons I learned was the concept of the rhumb line, R-H-U-M-B. You lay down a course from Newport to Bermuda, and that's your rhumb line. And then for some reason, you get blown off course. And, a lot of people make the mistake of saying, "Oh, we've got to get back to the rhumb line." There's a new rhumb line. It's from where you are to where you're going. And, it's so important to be able to pick up and forget all that and say, "Okay, play it where it lays." This is the new situation.
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J. Carter Brown

Director Emeritus
National Gallery of Art

I've gone on, stayed on under my other hat as Chairman of the Fine Arts Commission. And boy, did we get it at the time of the Vietnam Memorial! I mean, I had Ross Perot in my office pounding the table! I knew that he'd sent in operatives to Iran. I didn't know what was going to happen to me. He wanted it his way. And, there was great brouhaha about that. Now, we have brouhaha about the World War II memorial. And, as of just a couple of days ago, that's all been ripped open again, and we've got to go to through more of these hearings where a small dissident group has ginned up a lot of complaint. And basically, it's a resistance to change. There's a nostalgia about the way things were, everybody thinks they were always that way. They forget that the Mall is a 20th century concept, and the Jefferson Memorial also had people lying down in front of bulldozers. But, it was built in 1941, and we have added and changed the Mall continuously, and this is only going to enhance the great design of the vista between the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial. And yet people just want to keep everything the way it is. And fine, sometimes it's better the way it is. But, we feel that this little Fine Arts Commission -- which are chosen to have some kind of credentials in the visual world -- has a lot of experience in visualizing what something's going to be. And, we think it's going to be okay.
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Willie Brown

Former Mayor of San Francisco

The thing that I marvel about in my situation is that by all rights I should really hate white people for the kind of treatment that I received. But there, at this stage of my life, and probably for the last 40 years, I can't even conjure up how horrible it really was. So there's no way for me really to describe it. And I carry no residual displeasures towards any race of people. I think the experience that I had there made me a more tolerant person than I ordinarily would have been.
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Willie Brown

Former Mayor of San Francisco

It got so bad that I wouldn't read the Sunday paper, because there was always a front page story about Willie Brown, with a box showing how he voted 30 years ago, etc., etc., etc. And some of that stuff should stick to you, but I had determined at the outset of my campaign that I was going to shake the hands of every voter in San Francisco. That I was going to look every voter in the eye in San Francisco. And that I was going to market Willie Brown directly to the voter, thereby shielding any definition that anyone else would attempt to impose upon me. And I did that, it stood me in great stead. And I still don't read the Sunday paper.
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Linda Buck

Nobel Prize in Medicine

Linda Buck: It's puzzle solving, and that's one of the things I love about doing science. It's really puzzle solving, and the other part of it is that what you find is so beautiful. Nature's designs are so elegant. I'm a very empirical scientist. I don't theorize, because what usually happens is that the answer, the biological mechanisms that are used, are usually far more elegant than the theories that people come up with. Of course, you have to have a hypothesis, or some kinds of ideas to begin to explore. For example, the idea that there are proteins in the nose that recognize odorants was a quite reasonable one, and there was some indirect evidence for it. The question was how to find them. What I decided to do was to try to find genes encoding these molecules. I think Richard Axel also agreed that this was the logical thing to do, so I set out to do that. Instead of looking for a job and getting a faculty position, I stayed on there, with his blessing. I actually looked for a job, and of course, I just said -- I didn't say I was going to work on Aplysia -- I said I'm going to do this, which of course, people would think was impossible, and I could never have gotten a grant to look for this, because who knows? Maybe I wouldn't have found the receptors. So I set out to do it, and I worked very hard to do this.
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Linda Buck

Nobel Prize in Medicine

I moved to Harvard Medical School. I became an assistant professor there in neurobiology, and my next goal was to determine how the signals from these receptors in the nose were translated by the brain into perceptions. So there are actually about 350 different odorant receptors in humans, and about 1,000 different ones in mice. Mice we use as a model organism to understand how these systems work. So over the next ten years at Harvard, we used genes in coding the odorant receptors to try to understand how information is encoded in the system, and to give different perceptions. I was very fortunate to have a series of wonderful students and postdoctoral scientists that worked with me over that period, and it was a tremendous amount of fun just trying to figure out how it worked. We found out how information from the 1,000 different receptors is organized, first in the nose, and then in the two major relay centers in the brain: the olfactory bulb, which is in the front of the brain, and then the olfactory cortex.
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