Academy of Achievement Logo
Home
Achiever Gallery
Keys to Success
 Passion
 Vision
 Preparation
 Courage
   + [ Perseverance ]
 Integrity
 The American Dream
Achievement Podcasts
About the Academy
For Teachers

Search the site

Academy Careers

 
 
Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Frederick W. Smith

Founder, Federal Express

Frederick Smith: We'd run out of money and we didn't have all of the regulatory requirements that we needed. My half-sisters were up in arms because it looked like we were going to lose some money. I mean, everything was going wrong, except the fundamentals of the business were proving every single day that the idea was right. I mean, every single day the traffic was going up, and so eventually everything came right and worked out fine.
View Interview with Frederick W. Smith
View Biography of Frederick W. Smith
View Profile of Frederick W. Smith
View Photo Gallery of Frederick W. Smith



Frederick W. Smith

Founder, Federal Express

As time changed and markets changed and peoples' expectations changed, we changed with them. For example, when it became obvious that people wanted to interface with FedEx electronically, many years before people were doing this, we built an electronic interface system that allowed them to do business with us. When the Internet came on the horizon, we built versions of that that allowed people to interface with FedEx over the Internet. And now there are millions of people doing business with FedEx every day electronically.
View Interview with Frederick W. Smith
View Biography of Frederick W. Smith
View Profile of Frederick W. Smith
View Photo Gallery of Frederick W. Smith



Stephen Sondheim

Award-winning Composer and Lyricist

The producer, Cheryl Crawford, dropped out at the last minute. She'd been the putative producer for over a year. But she suddenly got cold feet. And so there we were, knowing that we had to get the show on by September because Lenny was unavailable starting in September. I had urged them to give the show earlier to Hal Prince and his partner, Bobby Griffith, but though they had done two successful shows, Pajama Game and Damn Yankees, Lenny and Jerry and Arthur didn't feel that they were experienced enough. So they preferred Cheryl. When Cheryl dropped out, I called Hal myself, who was out of town with a show called New Girl In Town, which was not going well, and so he was more than anxious to start a new project. However, I had played him the score before and he did not like the show, West Side. But because of that moment, catching him -- vulnerable -- in the last couple of weeks in Boston, and knowing that the minute the show opened in New York he would have something else to work on, it softened him up.
View Interview with Stephen Sondheim
View Biography of Stephen Sondheim
View Profile of Stephen Sondheim
View Photo Gallery of Stephen Sondheim



Wole Soyinka

Nobel Prize for Literature

Wole Soyinka: I began writing, scribbling notes, you know, in prison. But it wasn't actually published until after I'd come out. Writing became a therapy. First of all, it meant I was reconstructing my own existence. It was also an act of defiance. I wasn't supposed to write. I wasn't supposed to have paper, pen, anything, any reading material whatsoever. So this became an exercise in self-preservation, keeping up my spirits. It also, you had to occupy very long hours of the day, you know, not speaking to anyone. And I even -- it wasn't just writing. I evolved all kinds of mental exercises, even went back to those subjects which I said I hated in school, in particular mathematics. I started to try and recover my mathematical formulae by trial and error, and created problems for myself which I solved. You know, anything to keep the mind alive. As I said, it's an exercise in self-preservation. Writing was just part of it.
View Interview with Wole Soyinka
View Biography of Wole Soyinka
View Profile of Wole Soyinka
View Photo Gallery of Wole Soyinka



Wole Soyinka

Nobel Prize for Literature

I began looking for my notes, the chapters I'd written in prison. Somehow they disappeared for some time. Because I had to smuggle the books out, between whose lines I'd written some things. So getting them back together took a while, and I could not find the documents. And then one day, everything came back, and I began writing Aké: the Years of Childhood. In other words, the project had always been there. I'd always wanted to capture that period. And so I wrote Aké, and the interesting thing was that I later recovered my notes, and almost word for word, the three chapters I'd written when I was in prison tallied with new chapters in Aké. An interesting footnote about the powers of memory. I mean, virtually line by line. Of course, some changes here and there. But it was amazing how the recollection came, total recall, for about three chapters, just like in the notes in Aké.
View Interview with Wole Soyinka
View Biography of Wole Soyinka
View Profile of Wole Soyinka
View Photo Gallery of Wole Soyinka



Browse Perseverance quotes by achiever last name

Previous Page

          

Next Page