Academy of Achievement Logo
Home
Achiever Gallery
Keys to Success
   + [ Passion ]
 Vision
 Preparation
 Courage
 Perseverance
 Integrity
 The American Dream
Achievement Podcasts
About the Academy
For Teachers

Search the site

Academy Careers

 
 
Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Sally Field

Two Oscars for Best Actress

My mother was under contract to Paramount. She was in the days when they had contract players. She was spotted in the Pasadena Playhouse because she was incredibly beautiful. And then she studied with Charles Laughton. She always had a great, deep love of the 'craft' of acting because she sat in a small classroom with Charles Laughton and watched him perform all the time. He was a phenomenal actor. So I grew up with her loving the classics, reading Chekhov and Shakespeare and loving the real art of what acting is -- and acting is story-telling. So we had this kind of secret language between the two of us -- from the time I was little -- of acting. And when I finally found an acting class -- and thank God they had them. I underline that. They don't have them now. But I went to public school in the San Fernando Valley in California and they had acting classes. And in junior high even, I found the stage for the first time, and she and I would work on things together. I would work on scenes, with my little Romeo and Juliet soliloquies and the improvisations I was supposed to bring in. So it was a real communication that she and I had together, and she always supported that love that I had of it.
View Interview with Sally Field
View Biography of Sally Field
View Profile of Sally Field
View Photo Gallery of Sally Field



Sally Field

Two Oscars for Best Actress

Sally Field: My first performance on stage was some scenes from Romeo and Juliet when I was 13. And I was truly I must have been dreadful. I had no idea what I was doing, but it was so seminal, so incredibly important because -- I wanted to speak about it today but I left it out. I had this magical thing happen to me. I had no idea where I was going and I didn't know how it arrived, but I had this glorious out-of-body experience. I was on stage, saying words that I really didn't quite understand. I had no idea of what a technique was or anything, and I simply floated away. I didn't exist. There was no Sally -- little 13-year-old Sally -- on stage. There were hands and feet and a mouth, working and saying things, but they weren't mine. And it is this blissful glorious high that I had early on in my life, and it is what has taught me and guided me forever, because when I lost sight of what on God's green earth was I doing here, why was I doing this, why was I beating myself up, I remembered that moment. And my whole life has been trying to understand how to get back there, trying to own that gift, that ability that human beings have to float away to some creative place that is simply God-like.
View Interview with Sally Field
View Biography of Sally Field
View Profile of Sally Field
View Photo Gallery of Sally Field



Sally Field

Two Oscars for Best Actress

Sally Field: I kind of lived in the drama department, very much lived in the drama department. And I was so lucky, again, that I had the drama department, but that I had these wonderful teachers. Mr. Culp was one of them, a remarkable fellow who was dedicated to the arts and theater arts, and taught us all about theater in high school. We performed scenes, and we also performed a term play. But I got so hungry and aggressive with it that sometimes he would call me to his office and tell me I had to be nicer to the other students because I just was hungry to do the roles. I just was hungry to work. And I would pick for my scenes the people who I thought, "Hmm, who will take this most seriously?" It was a terribly important time to me, because I went right from that "Who knew?"-- right from that into the big bad world. I really clung to this image of myself that I had created in high school of being strong enough to pull it off, when really I was just a little kid.
View Interview with Sally Field
View Biography of Sally Field
View Profile of Sally Field
View Photo Gallery of Sally Field



Judah Folkman

Cancer Research

Judah Folkman: I noticed that while dad was praying for the patients -- but they had heart attacks and they were in oxygen tents, and they were very sick, and it seemed that the doctors actually were doing things, starting the intraveneouses and had a more active role. So I thought I would go that route. It's still the service to people.
View Interview with Judah Folkman
View Biography of Judah Folkman
View Profile of Judah Folkman
View Photo Gallery of Judah Folkman



Judah Folkman

Cancer Research

Judah Folkman: It was a very warm home with a tremendous sense of humor, and also an enormous value placed on learning. Every day, when we would come home for dinner, every day mom or dad would say, "Well, what did you learn today?" with great interest, like "Teach us." Not, not in the sense that you didn't learn anything. So no matter what, we'd say, "Well, we had geography. "So we'd tell them. They'd be so interested, as though they didn't know. So it was that for the whole time. I always remember. That's something we, all of us, remembered: "What did you learn?"
View Interview with Judah Folkman
View Biography of Judah Folkman
View Profile of Judah Folkman
View Photo Gallery of Judah Folkman



Judah Folkman

Cancer Research

Judah Folkman: What is exciting about studying just this process, it's a process called angiogenesis, how blood vessels grow, is that it continues to lead to fruitful discoveries. These come every -- they come over long periods of time, sort of an "Aha!" moment. When you find out, for example, that the same molecules that you were studying that the tumor has made in excess, one of them is the one that completely is the cause of diabetic retinopathy, of the millions of people who have blood vessels in their eye. And that this one is also the cause, in a different regulation, of macular degeneration. 15 million Americans who have that -- blood vessels again in the back of the eye -- elderly, and 200,000 blind from it. No drug at all exists, nothing, and even laser doesn't work. And that's primitive because they burn away the retina and then it doesn't work, so people go blind. And now you realize that you have -- in fact -- you understand it enough to turn that off.
View Interview with Judah Folkman
View Biography of Judah Folkman
View Profile of Judah Folkman
View Photo Gallery of Judah Folkman



Shelby Foote

Novelist and Historian

A big sustaining thing was I believed firmly that I was doing important work, and I thought it was going good, so I felt good. There's nothing that makes a writer truly as happy. Nothing anywhere makes him as truly as happy as going to bed at night, putting his head on the pillow with the idea of getting up and getting at his desk the next morning. That's a happy man, and I had that for all that time.
View Interview with Shelby Foote
View Biography of Shelby Foote
View Profile of Shelby Foote
View Photo Gallery of Shelby Foote



Browse Passion quotes by achiever last name

Previous Page

          

Next Page