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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


B.B. King

King of the Blues

I really wanted to be a gospel singer. That's what I wanted to be. This professor had a nephew that was a popular musician that played with a guy called Buddy Johnson. So when we would talk about music he would say to me, "You can do it if you want to. You can play music. You can preach. You can do whatever you want to do, but you've got to want to and you need a good education. You need to learn to do this." He would say, "We live on a plantation, we're in the country, and most people will put you down a little bit because you live in the country." It's true because when we would go to town people would say, "Here come them country people." But, we did just the opposite. "There are them old city folks," you know. My mother would take me to church, and this preacher in the church was named Reverend Archie Fair, we called him. Archie Fair was his name, and he played guitar in the church, so I wanted to be like him. And, I never really wanted to be a preacher, but I wanted to be a gospel singer, but my family thought that if I kept things up, kept going, one day I would be a preacher. Of course, I ain't dead yet, so I don't think it's too late, but I've enjoyed doing what I'm doing for so long now.
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Coretta Scott King

Pioneer of Civil Rights

Coretta Scott King: I studied elementary education and music at Antioch, and I couldn't get a full music degree but I always wanted to study music; that was my first love. In high school, I had a teacher who influenced me greatly, Miss Olive J. Williams, and she was versatile in music, and I wanted to be like her. She exposed me to the world of classical music. Before then, I had never heard classical music. She exposed me also to the great composers of the world, as well as black performers, which I didn't know about at the time: Marian Anderson, Paul Robeson, Roland Hayes and Dorothy Maynor and others. So I got my foundation and my beginning there, and then, at Antioch, I built on that with another teacher named Walter Anderson. He was the one who eventually encouraged me to apply when I graduated from Antioch to the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston.
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Larry King

Broadcasters' Hall of Fame

Once I worked for Associated Merchandising Corporation at 1440 Broadway. And that was a company that factored the sale of goods, and you had to call up and get credit lines. I was a mail clerk. But in that building was WOR. And WOR was on the 22nd floor, and we were on the 3rd floor. And almost five or six times a day I would take the elevator up to the 22nd floor and pretend that I was an announcer. Like going down in the elevator to go out to lunch. And sometimes when I'd get on the elevator, some announcers would walk on. And I'd hear them talk, and I just wanted to do that. I just wanted to be that.
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Larry King

Broadcasters' Hall of Fame

When I broke in, in 1957, you didn't have to have gone to college. It was wide open. Now it's a very "in" field. So you're up against strong competition. So the first thing I would say is, it doesn't matter where you grew up. If you grew up in Indiana, or Mississippi, or New York, or you grew up poor, or rich, you've got to want it. You've got want it real -- every one of my friends who are successful wanted. If they didn't know what field they wanted, they knew they wanted to be somebody. That great Marlon Brando line in On The Waterfront , "I could have been a contender!" We wanted to be that. We had a high ratio of success orientation. One of my jokes is, even our criminals went to the chair. We didn't have guys do two to five. Come on! We didn't have no petty larceny. These guys were heavyweights. Tony Mancuso died in the electric chair. He was one of our heroes. I mean, he was a gutsy guy.
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Larry King

Broadcasters' Hall of Fame

I know guys in medicine who are disappointed in medicine. Guys in law who would give it up. Guys in business who say, "I wish I could do something else." I never knew a broadcaster that wanted to make a mid-life career switch. There's something about it. It's an art form that is always as good. In other words, I'm having as much fun today as I did when I made $55 a week, because it is as much fun. I mean, the names are bigger, the show is worldwide, but basically, I get a chance -- and any broadcaster gets this, if you're co-hosting a show, if you're broadcasting a game, if you're doing anything -- you've got a royal pass onto life in the broadcasting business. If you're a disk jockey in Biloxi, Mississippi making a hundred dollars a week, you're having as good a time as me.
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