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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Chuck Jones

Animation Pioneer

I'm still astonished that somebody would offer me a job and pay me to do what I wanted to do. And to this day, that's been the astonishment of my life, and delight of my life, and the wonder of my life, and the puzzlement that anybody would be so stupid as to be willing to do that. I hear all these success stories of people, these captains of industry, these forgers of the world, and empire builders and so on. And they talk about all the money they've made and become presidents and all that, and I thought, jeez, but look at me. When I was offered a chance to be head of studios I wouldn't take it. I like to work with the tools of my trade. The tools of my trade is a lot of paper and a pencil, and that's all it is.
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James Earl Jones

National Medal of Arts

James Earl Jones: When I left the Army -- when I left my training in Fort Benning, I bought a little used car that broke down in Akron, Ohio. In that little used car was all my poems, you know. So I put it in storage, and then when I went back to collect it later on after the Army, it was missing. And I'm grateful that the poem about grapefruit was missing, cause -- although it was it had all the poetic values and had all the meter and all that, it was basically -- just as Longfellow imitated the Finnish author of Kalevalaa, I imitated Longfellow's 'Hiawatha," and it had all that. But it was really about the beauty -- I don't know if anybody else can appreciate it. I wouldn't expect them to. In the wintertime, in the snow country, citrus fruit was so rare, and if you got one, it was better than ambrosia. It was better than a peach, it was better than anything you can imagine from exotic worlds, you know. And, I just poured my heart out to the wonders of grapefruit.
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James Earl Jones

National Medal of Arts

James Earl Jones: It wasn't acting. It was language. It was speech. It was the thing that I'd been denied all those years and had denied myself all those years. I now had a great -- an abnormal -- appreciation for it, you know. And it was the idea that you can do a play -- like a Shakespeare play, or any well-written play, Arthur Miller, whatever -- and say things you could never imagine saying, never imagine thinking in your own life. You could say these things! That's what it's still about, whether it's the movies or TV or what. That what it's still about.
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Quincy Jones

Music Impresario

My grades in music were terrible before that, but then the love, this passion came forth, and that's when somebody lit a flame, a candle inside, and that candle still burns, you know, it never went out. I'd stay up all night sometimes until my eyes bled to write the music. I was writing a suite, a Concerto in Blue for something at the school, for concert band, and I was fearless!
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Quincy Jones

Music Impresario

I guess what's so strong about it is that -- outside of you growing as an arranger, or a composer, or an orchestrator -- it's the idea that when you conduct a symphony orchestra, 110 people plus the conductor are thinking about exactly the same thing, at exactly the same time, down to the microscopic proportions -- the 32nd and 64th notes. That's a lot of energy because minds aren't trailing off, thinking about the news, or what's on the stock market or anything today, or what you have to get for groceries, or what's for dinner. It's exactly on what that thought is, the thought of the composer, whoever composed it, and the orchestrator, and performing it, reproducing it. It's a very powerful experience. It's a very rewarding, enriching experience, and it hits you in your soul. It goes through the ear, but it hits the soul. You can't touch it, you can't taste it, you can't smell it, you can't see it, and it's just so powerful for the soul.
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