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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Sir Peter Jackson

Oscar for Best Director

I was beginning to get interested in film, but that came through watching Thunderbirds on TV, a British TV show, Thunderbirds. When I was about five, our parents got TV. When I was five, I remember it arriving in the lounge in a cardboard box and Dad having to screw the wooden legs into the set, this old black-and-white Philips set. So from five, I had TV, watched Thunderbirds, was really captivated by the fantasy elements, and the TV show has lots of models of spaceships and interesting sort of gimmicks and gadgets. It's a great TV show, very, very inventive and imaginative. The next thing that happened really is seeing King Kong, the original King Kong, when I was nine, and that film really accelerated a burgeoning interest in special effects, models and films. I could make models quite well.
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Sir Peter Jackson

Oscar for Best Director

I got interested in stop-motion animation as a result of King Kong. Ray Harryhausen's films, two: 7th Voyage of Sinbad, Jason and the Argonauts. They're all stop-motion. We move the figure one frame at a time, and my camera didn't have a "one frame" button. I could only just squeeze the trigger and squirt off two or three frames before I had to move the puppet, and then another two or three frames, so very, very jerky animation, since it was very imprecise. But anyway, this was all sort of fueling me. I wanted for a long time to be Ray Harryhausen's assistant when I grew up, and help him do stop-motion animation. Didn't think about directing films at this point in time. I just wanted to do special effects.
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Sir Peter Jackson

Oscar for Best Director

I'm here because I'm a film maker and I want to make films, and that's been the way I felt almost since I was born, and I've never really thought about doing anything else, and so I had -- my parents supported me, and that support is really important, and I often think how many people out there have failed to achieve in later life because they didn't get that support from their parents when they were young.
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Donald Johanson

Discoverer of Lucy

Donald Johanson: There is a tremendous amount of romanticism which surrounds going off on expeditions to remote parts of the world and camping in tents, and living in a desert and struggling with all of the trials and tribulations that one encounters. But, I think that what really intrigued me was the fact that I felt that this was and still is really, a science, a form of inquiry, which is still in its infancy. That there were so many things yet to be discovered, that the science itself would have, in my lifetime, still lots of surprises.
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Donald Johanson

Discoverer of Lucy

My father, my real father died when I was two years old so I never knew him. He was a barber. He was a barber in Chicago. My mother had no formal education whatsoever. A very, very bright woman, very intelligent women, but a women when she was 16 years old living in Sweden, decided that the place where things were happening was the United States. It wasn't in the old world as it was called. It wasn't in Sweden. She wanted to be part of the new world. She borrowed money from her father. She didn't speak any English. She left Sweden and came to the United States, landed in New York City and got a job in an ice cream parlor. Learned English, then went back and got the man she wanted to marry, who was my father. Once my father died, in 1945, my mother had a very difficult time financially. She spent her career being a domestic, being a cleaning lady. She earned enough money to support the two of us, and to assist me in my attempts to go to college. So there was a tremendous work ethic, which she had, and had a tremendous influence on me in terms of, if you want to do something, you can do it. There really are few obstacles that are going to prevent you from doing it. She was a very important role model for me, for very different reasons.
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Philip Johnson

Dean of American Architects

All of my advice is straight to all kids, "Should I be an architect?" I say "No." Always say no, because if you can help it, don't. Go into something that'll make money, if that's what most Americans seem to want, me included. Just don't bother with architecture. You remember when a kid came up to Mozart and said, "Should I write a symphony now, Mr. Mozart? Do you know what I do?" Mozart said, "No." And the kid said, "Why do you say no? You wrote a symphony when you were my age," and he said, "Yeah, but I didn't ask anybody." In other words, if you're going to be an architect, you'd better have a feeling inside that you can't help it. A "calling" it used to be called in the days when religion was a little more popular.
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Philip Johnson

Dean of American Architects

All right, the times go bad, the times go good, but the eternal things, like poetry or architecture, go on. And, they will go on. That is one of the great things about being connected to an art as great as architecture. It's your desire -- Plato's words -- desire for immortality. That's what keeps you going, not sex. It doesn't make any difference anyhow at my age, but it's not important as a drive, Mr. Freud to the contrary notwithstanding. Plato was right. Everybody has a desire for immortality. So when you die isn't very important. Because your immortality -- what did you do when you were here that made any sense?
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