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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Barry Scheck

Co-Founder, Innocence Project

Barry Scheck: After I left Berkeley, I worked for awhile for the United Farm Workers union. And then I took the New York and California bar at the same time, which was a little hard then. And then eventually, after I went back, I worked as a public defender in the South Bronx for the Legal Aid Society for two-and-a-half years, before I sort of accidentally wound up as a law professor. That was a great job. That really was the right place to be for somebody like me, and it was a natural extension of what during this period of time there's a whole group of us in this era that were motivated by the Civil Rights Movement and the anti-war movement. If you became a lawyer, what were you going to do? One logical place was defending poor people as a public defender. And it turned out that they sent all the people that they thought had this kind of political motivation to the Bronx. So we were all there when the Bronx was really -- the Carter Administration designated -- like the most bereft urban neighborhood in the United States. It was a time that they made that movie Fort Apache, and unfortunately many of the neighborhoods looked just like that.
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Fritz Scholder

Native American Artist

Fritz Scholder: It's strange, but all kids draw. I never stopped. I was real shy, and all I wanted to do was stay in my room and draw, so I wouldn't have to deal with people. This, at the time, was difficult. But in retrospect, I always knew what I had to be. There was never any question. It was all that I could do. Plus, I was a rebel, right from the beginning. If someone told me to do something, I'd do the opposite. So I was, in a way, a bad boy in school, and yet, because I was reserved and because of my talent, I was treated pretty nicely, I must say. I sold my first painting in grade school to a friend of mine for four dollars. And I sold my second painting to a grade school buddy for five dollars and slowly worked up from there.
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Fritz Scholder

Native American Artist

Fritz Scholder: Early on, for some reason, I realized that I did not want to live like others. And I saw people go to jobs they hated, come home, and not be happy. I had a problem with authority, so I knew that I couldn't have an eight-to-five job with a boss. But it came early on to me that by being an artist I would have the most freedom. Because an artist not only has to make up his own problem, but then solve it, in whatever way he decides to do that, and it's all up to him.
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Robert Schuller

Crystal Cathedral

Robert Schuller: I was raised in the country on a farm. I was the last of five children, so I grew up in a great deal of solitude. I could walk to the river, and sit on the riverbanks and watch the river quietly move. It was tranquil water, not dramatic water. I could watch the clouds sliding silently through the soundless sea of space, and fell in love with the sky. And so, a quarter of a century later, when I went to California to begin a new church, I picked the drive-in theater as a place to hold church services, because I liked the sky. I didn't have to look at a ceiling. And I think that affected me subconsciously. I think I choose windows and no ceilings.
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Robert Schuller

Crystal Cathedral

When I hired the architect, Philip Johnson he said, "You need a building to seat three thousand." "Yes." "And you want it all glass?" "Yes." "How much money can you afford to spend?" I said, "Nothing. I don't have anything. But," I said, "It's your job to design a masterpiece. If you do your job, the masterpiece will attract financial support - smart people, sophisticated people, successful people. They'll take a look at it and say, 'That building must be built! It should stand on planet Earth.'"
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Robert Schuller

Crystal Cathedral

Robert Schuller: What drives me is the compulsion to encourage people. And I have, at my disposal, professional techniques that only we, as pastors, can use. And, that's a device called giving people a blessing, locking eyes, connecting hearts. And, as a professional pastor, I have the freedom to touch them, gently, soft fingers on the skin, and lock eyes and say, "May God bless you where you need the blessing most. Amen." That's just fantastic.
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