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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Anthony Romero

Executive Director, ACLU

Anthony Romero: From when I was a little boy, I always knew I wanted to be an attorney. I don't know why. There is no attorney in my family. My father was a waiter and my mother stayed at home and I'm the first of my family to finish high school. But somehow I always got it in my mind that I would be a lawyer. Perhaps it was because I was argumentative, because I always spoke my mind, perhaps because I never really understood the rules of the nuns in Catholic school, was always questioning them. Over time it just kind of stuck with me, that I would be a lawyer. Later on in life I understood the role the law would play in social justice and that we would be change agents for people. I saw that it could make a real difference in people's lives, and that's really where I understood the importance of being an attorney for issues, for causes, for people, for ideals. So I don't know, maybe it was in my DNA from the beginning, but I always knew I wanted to be an advocate for change.
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Anthony Romero

Executive Director, ACLU

Anthony Romero: The struggle for civil rights and civil liberties is really a very basic one. It's one we all understand. We have the right to live with dignity. Each of us -- regardless of who we are, or what background we come from, or what religion or what race -- have a right to determine how we think about the world, what we say, whom we love, who we associate ourselves with. It's the ability to tap into that most beautiful part of the human experience, of saying, "I decide what I want to be and what I do and what I say and what I think." We all feel that, we all feel the sense of personality, of individuality, and the idea then that there are barriers that impede our ability to live our lives fully, there are barriers that impede our ability to be all we can be. That's what we do, we remove the barriers, we remove the blocks. It's about taking every person whose life is precious and making sure that they can make the most of it as they wish. That's, in the end, what we do every day.
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James Rosenquist

Pop Art Master

I tried for a scholarship at the Art Students League by sending in drawings. And they wrote me a letter: "Dear James, we are happy to announce that we will give you one year's free schooling at the Art Students League." And I found myself in New York in the fall of 1955 with $350 bucks in my pocket and a room at the YMCA. I checked in to the Art Students League, and I studied with old-timers there -- Edwin Dickinson, George Grosz, Morris Kantor, Vaclav Vytlacil, all those old boys there. That was really an introduction to a private art which was fine art. Where drawing and painting could be applied to advertising, and to whatever, television, whatever, but a really private gesture would be -- a secret, private gesture -- would be your own idea, your own compositions that you enjoyed yourself. And to do something, to paint something or draw something or do something, to prove to oneself that you actually had the idea, would seem to be the important. Otherwise, the idea remained a concept, and no one could understand what you were thinking. So I think it was really like -- not a self-analysis -- but it's really thinking you have some strange, unusual idea and can talk about it and talk about it, but it doesn't mean anything unless you actually can see something physical about that. So that's what that meant to me at that time.
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James Rosenquist

Pop Art Master

I remember the pure -- just the feeling of having things around in my studio that I liked, and I really didn't want to sell them, back in 1960 and '61. That was my environment that I made, and it didn't take much money to live, but I never thought that I could ever have enough money to get married, to own a car. Maybe a car, but not a house or anything like that. I know there was a question that I thought you were going to ask me about. Did I think that I would as successful as I am, or whatever? And I certainly didn't think so, because I didn't know how to qualify success. I didn't know. Success to me was just to be able to understand. Success was a very, very private matter, of having the wherewithal to very simply express an idea.
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Pete Rozelle

Pro Football Hall of Fame

I followed sports so closely. I just thought that athletes were tremendous. I watched their games -- we didn't have a television in those days, but I'd go to them. And if you liked sports, well then, outstanding athletes just became a natural role model for you. And you did not know much about them in those days. That's why I get very concerned when you have these instances that happen in sports, involving drugs, alcohol abuse by a player. Other incidents. Why, it's tough when you're supposed to be the guardian of the sport. You're repulsed by that, you know, you hate it. But people are people, and you just do the best you can and try to quiet that aspect.
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Pete Rozelle

Pro Football Hall of Fame

When you become part of a crowd of 60, 70, 80,000 people, you are swept up with the emotion that other people feel. You feed off that emotion. Like the wave they have in some stadiums, that we all see. And you become part of the synergism of the big crowd. And I think a lot of women who don't know football too well, but they get excited at a football game because of this feeling you take from a big crowd -- the excitement that everyone feels.
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