Academy of Achievement Logo
Home
Achiever Gallery
Keys to Success
   + [ Passion ]
 Vision
 Preparation
 Courage
 Perseverance
 Integrity
 The American Dream
Achievement Podcasts
About the Academy
For Teachers

Search the site

Academy Careers

 
 
Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Wynton Marsalis

Pulitzer Prize for Music

Wynton Marsalis: Well, I always equated rock with something social like meeting girls, and stuff. I never equated it with music. So, I would be on the bandstand, and the music itself was all right, but I had also heard my daddy and them play. So, I knew what was going on our bandstand -- playing rock -- wasn't what was going on his bandstand. Also, I had played with orchestras, and I definitely knew what was going on an orchestral bandstand was not what went on on our rock bandstand. There is a lot of debate about how "It's just music," and all this stuff that people talk now, if you stand on all those different bandstands on a certain level, you know that it's not all just music. It's something very different that goes on in all of those instances. It's like, if you go in a club to hear Coltrane play, or you go into one of these clubs down on 42nd Street and take in a burlesque show, well it's a club and you are going out, but it's very different. But jazz, it's just the soul of it and also the intellect of it. To listen to John Coltrane when he start playing. I'd come home and put that Coltrane record on, "Cousin Mary" would be playing, just the sound in that music. I'd be pantomiming like I was a saxophone player, just listening to 'Trane, that type of cry that he had in his sound. And, I wanted to make somebody feel like how that made me feel listening to it. And, Clifford Brown and Miles Davis, when he was playing jazz, early Miles, I would listen to Clifford, just the way he could play, the style of the music, the feeling of it, the whole lifestyle, the whole jazz. It was all in my mind then. Even though my father was a musician, he was my father. I didn't look at him like anything but my father. But, on these records then I could hear just a pride, a something, a dignity. They had a nobility to it, a profundity. I just wanted to be part of it, even though it didn't exist in my era.
View Interview with Wynton Marsalis
View Biography of Wynton Marsalis
View Profile of Wynton Marsalis
View Photo Gallery of Wynton Marsalis



Barry Marshall

Nobel Prize in Medicine

Barry Marshall: I was always curious and very interested in science, and always enjoyed school. Each year I would always be thinking, "Wow! Next year at school, or at college, I'll be able to do chemistry, or geometry that I can't do now." Or in medical school it was, "Wow! Next year I'll be able to do anatomy!" Cutting up dead bodies was my big goal in first-year medicine, and so it went on. Every year there was something exciting and wonderful that I was looking forward to the next year. Medicine is like that, just so varied that even after I graduated I thought I only wanted to be a general practitioner. But every single sub-specialty I did in my internship, I'd come home from the first week and I'd say to my wife, "I want to be a neurosurgeon. This is great!" Or, "I want to be a hematologist," or cancer specialist. Everything fascinated me, and it was really only because I got involved in this little project with the bacteria in the stomach that I ended up going into gastroenterology. Because any specialty would have made me perfectly happy.
View Interview with Barry Marshall
View Biography of Barry Marshall
View Profile of Barry Marshall
View Photo Gallery of Barry Marshall



Barry Marshall

Nobel Prize in Medicine

One of the things my wife says is that she actually has five children. She's got the four children and me, and that I never grew up. A lot of doctors seem to be in this category, in that they have always got this childish curiosity, and they go into med school because they can't face life, and they know it will be seven years before they actually have to make a real life decision. And then if you stay in medicine and train further for a specialty, you can postpone this real life event, if you like. And then if you can go into research Well, actually you never have to finish. I think that's the ideal choice.
View Interview with Barry Marshall
View Biography of Barry Marshall
View Profile of Barry Marshall
View Photo Gallery of Barry Marshall



John Mather

Nobel Prize in Physics

John Mather: When I was a child, I was really interested in astronomy, and it was just one of those things that was full of mystery at that time. I studied lenses and telescopes and I saw the surface of the sun with a little telescope that I made with lenses in a cardboard tube. So I was all enthusiastic about astronomy when I was in grade school. And then I learned a little bit more in high school, and I took physics courses. And finally, through graduate school, I was thinking I wanted to be a particle physicist, because that was the biggest mystery of that time. Then I was looking for a thesis project though, and I found an adviser who had this new idea to measure the cosmic microwave background radiation -- the primordial heat of the universe. It had just been discovered five years before that, so it was time to go measure. So okay. Well, I'll try that. So that was the beginning of my career as an astrophysicist. Most of my training is as a physicist rather than as an astronomer.
View Interview with John Mather
View Biography of John Mather
View Profile of John Mather
View Photo Gallery of John Mather



John Mather

Nobel Prize in Physics

John Mather: Personally my experience is we are going like crazy for ambitious projects to explore the solar system, to explore the cosmos, doing everything we possibly can. Our technology has gotten better and better and we can do these amazing things. Our application to things at home keeps on improving too. So as far as I can tell, we are continuing to do even more than we ever could before. Maybe the public isn't noticing, because their attention is on other things. Among other things we didn't have any big disasters lately. When the Hubble telescope was launched and was a problem, then everybody knew about it, and then we fixed it. So we were in the news. When you do everything right, people don't notice. They just say, "Oh, that's cool. They must not be doing anything exciting." But to me, what we're doing scientifically is as exciting as you could possibly imagine. I guess, perhaps you're also talking about the manned program, which has come to a temporary end in the sense of we no longer have a space shuttle to fly. But we're very close now to getting people to ride on our commercial launch vehicles that were set out as part of the plan. So pretty soon we should be able to do that again. That's pretty important.
View Interview with John Mather
View Biography of John Mather
View Profile of John Mather
View Photo Gallery of John Mather



Browse Passion quotes by achiever last name

Previous Page

          

Next Page