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Lee Berger

The Origins of Humanity

Lee Berger: You know, I don't actually listen to music while we're conducting these expeditions, and there's a couple of reasons why. Because there's almost no time, and I know that might sound funny to people, but these events -- and I've got to go back in my mind to this Rising Star expedition. People's lives were at stake at every moment. This was incredibly dangerous. I was personally taking a decision that I was risking people's lives to send them in and out of these chambers constantly to discover fossils, to bring bones up. And so when I set up that expedition model, and we laid the three and a half kilometers of cable, and we had a command center and science tent and caving tent and all those sort of things, every moment of my mind was focused on those cameras and those audio systems, watching and thinking about those people. There wasn't time for music in that. It was an extraordinary -- and then, as we started making these huge discoveries -- it wasn't skeleton. It was multiple skeletons, and then we realized that what was happening to us was extraordinary. We knew we were in perhaps one of the most remarkable events any paleontologists or archeologists have ever faced. That was music to me.
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Lee Berger

The Origins of Humanity

Lee Berger: I have always lived my life thinking there's more to be found, that we don't know everything. Yeah, that's tough. It's tough in a field where 99.9 percent of the people never make a discovery of one of these things in the wild in their entire life. It's hard to keep going. I went for 17 years finding bits and pieces. But there is always that thing in me that says there is something else out there. To be fair, I never visualized this happening to me. I never visualized sediba. You know, I would have been happy with a mandible, a jaw, a piece of an arm -- anything -- prior to 2008. Then there were skeletons. There is something in me that says that's not enough, and so we keep looking. And then naledi came along. There's more out there. I know that for a fact because I also learned a lesson from sediba. We didn't stop exploring after naledi, and there are more things. Those are not miracles, and there's more to be found.
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Sir Timothy Berners-Lee

Father of the World Wide Web

My parents were both mathematicians. They obviously had a lot of fun with math. I was the eldest. I am the eldest of four. We all grew up in an atmosphere where math was sort of interesting, it was everywhere. So making pudding or making a pie involved some calculations and things. I suppose when I was little, I had two friends in elementary school, and we would discuss science. We weren't very athletic. We would walk around the playground and talk about chemistry and biology and physics, and we would wind electromagnets by taking transformer wire and wrap it around a nail. I remember those electromagnets didn't work very well. The book said you should put the nail in the hearth, in the embers of the fire, and let it cool, so that it got the right temper -- but we didn't have a fire with embers, so that never happened. The nail would become a permanent magnet. That was the first sort of interest in, I suppose, what was to become later electronics.
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Sir Timothy Berners-Lee

Father of the World Wide Web

Later on, as I went through high school, then I came across a couple of teachers who were also great: Daffy Pernell, who taught chemistry; Frank Grundy, who taught math. Both excited, just bubbling over with enthusiasm, just so excited about the idea. So you could talk to them. Just after class, the class would all leave, and they'd continue to talk excitedly about something, maybe going out from the curriculum to something that they were actually personally more interested in. And Frank was great. When he would put a problem on the board for the class, he would say, "Okay. Work this out, for N equals 2," and then for anybody who was interested, he sort of thought, "Is that true for all N?" or "Is there a quick, better way of doing this?" Just these little teasers. Or he'd end up with having got through the algebraic with a sum, the difference between two numbers to the power of 3.5 or something, and he'd then write it down to three decimal places straight off. We thought that was magic, or he cheated, and then he'd explain how he'd use the binomial theorem or whatever it is, and have an approximation. So he was full of -- I guess it's the passion is the main thing, and just letting it radiate. So both of those were good mentors, role models.
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Yogi Berra

Baseball Hall of Fame

We played ball all the time. I played every sport there was in St. Louis. Not basketball, I was too short. I played a lot of soccer. I played football. I played softball. And, we had a game called "cartball." Did you ever play with bottle caps? We'd played with bottle caps, with broomsticks. Softball, everything. I played every sport. I actually didn't know I liked to play baseball until I was 14.
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