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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Norman Mailer

Two Pulitzer Prizes

Norman Mailer: "The Time of Her Time" was a piece of fiction, a pure piece of fiction. And I remember, at the time I wrote it, I had a brave publisher, Walter Minton, with Putnam. And he decided he wanted to try publishing it. He decided the time was right that he could do it, because most people who read it said, "Well, this is marvelous. This is wonderful. This is one of the best things you've ever written, but it's unpublishable. You can't possibly publish it. It breaks too many taboos." Nonetheless, Minton published it. A lot of people defended it at the time, because in those days we used to feel we were in a war. There were a great many of us, not only writers, but critics as well, novelists collaborated to a degree, in the sense that we were fighting the Philistines who wanted to hold literature back. So, a great many people came to my aid on that story. The net effect of it was that a book came out with the story. It was a book called Advertisements for Myself, and nothing bad happened. There was no censorship of it. Later, Minton used to love to say that one of the reasons he published Lolita was he saw he could get away with it. He could do it, because he realized that for all the brouhaha over the dangers of publishing "The Time of Her Time," nothing had happened. And so he thought, "Yes, with this wonderful book by Nabokov called Lolita, I'm going to publish that and I can get away with that too." And he did. He was a very bold publisher, the last of the Mohicans in a way.
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Peyton Manning

Super Bowl Champion Quarterback

I think the worst question that the media asks athletes when they sign their contracts, or when they get drafted, is "What are you going to do with your money?" That's a bad question. There's not a good answer that people want to hear come from that. I blame the media for asking the question. But the answer that I gave, which I think all of them should say, is "I'm going to earn it." That's what I said, "I'm going to earn it," and not, "I'm going to go buy this or buy that." I'm going to go earn it. That is how I have always felt about the money that you make as an athlete, the money that you are paid on your potential, to go earn it, to make the owner and the president happy about the investment they made in you, about working hard to be the best player that you can be.
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Peyton Manning

Super Bowl Champion Quarterback

The thing that gives me peace of mind at night after a game, or after a season, is that I knew that I did everything that I could to get ready to play that game. I couldn't have prepared harder. I couldn't have studied any more tape. I couldn't have spent any (more time on) last-minute details, talking to my receivers. I went into that game ready. "Boy, I'd love to have this throw back," or "God, I wish we just could have gotten in the end zone on that play." I don't sleep well that night, but I can sleep, knowing that I did everything I could to get ready.
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Peyton Manning

Super Bowl Champion Quarterback

My deal was always, "You better work harder in college than you did in high school to make it in college, and if you get to pro ball, you better work a lot harder than you did in college, to make it harder than that, if you want to excel at the pro level." That's what gets some guys, I think. I think they get to the pro ball, and they go, "I've made it! I've done it!" and really, you haven't done anything. If you get drafted, that means you were a good college player. That means you're a great college player, but this NFL is "What are you about to do?" They're paying you for what they hope you do do. So you better be burning some hours and putting in the time in order to accomplish those goals. So that's one thing that can never be sacrificed, is your preparation and your work ethic, keeping yourself in shape, staying sharp mentally, working with your teammates to improve yourself as a player.
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Peyton Manning

Super Bowl Champion Quarterback

I got to watch my dad as a kid, how he handled himself after games with fans, with the media. I can remember, as a kid, just how patient he was, and how courteous he was to his fans. I certainly didn't think at five, six, seven years old that I would be doing that same profession. But at the same time, for Eli and I both, now that we are doing that, I remember how he handled himself. My mother still today tells me to be nice and, "They wouldn't ask for your autograph if they didn't want it," and "They'll stop asking for it at some point."
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Wynton Marsalis

Pulitzer Prize for Music

Some people they just want to play music for the ego purposes. They don't really want to play music, they want to be known. So to those people, I give like some impossible exercise to do and tell them to call me back after they've done that. I say, "Oh, you want to do that? Okay. Well, learn all your major and minor scales, learn all your chord progressions, get these three books, and do this exercise for a year. And, then when I come back, come for me and play." But that's not what they are interested in. They want to know how to get a record contract. So I say, "Learn these five records and come back." But you never see them again because they're not interested in music.
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Wynton Marsalis

Pulitzer Prize for Music

Economic achievement really doesn't mean anything in music. I could go out tomorrow and win the lottery, and win $20 million, but when I sit down to the piano to write a song, or try to give logic and coherence to some music, or to peep some beauty out, or to develop in my art form, all that money is not going to help me at all. And, that is why art has been used as a barometer of history because it is incorruptible. You can't corrupt it. The only way to achieve a level of beauty and a sophistication is through doing the work. There's no other way. You can't money your way into being Picasso. There just is no way. You have to have the talent, and then you have to forge that talent through years of dedication. Not through a week or a month or even with phenomenal talent, even the most talented musicians, they still have to work harder to hone their talent, to shape a sort of beauty.
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