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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Benjamin Carson

Pediatric Neurosurgeon

Benjamin Carson: The most important thing to me is taking your God-given talents and developing them to the utmost, so that you can be useful to your fellow man, period. That is by far the most important thing. And, you know, whether I happen to be the first black person to do that, or the first person, period, to do that -- which is the case in both situations -- I don't know that that's particularly important.
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Jimmy Carter

Nobel Prize for Peace

I experienced the ravages of racial discrimination as a child, and even as an adult, and I've seen discrimination against women, and wars all over the world because of ethnic discrimination. The greatest discrimination in the world now, here in Atlanta or in New York is a discrimination against poor people. We don't even know them. We care in general about homelessness, or drug addiction, or school dropouts, but we don't know a homeless person, and we don't know a drug addict, and we don't know a school dropout or a teenage pregnant woman. This is not a deliberate discrimination, it's a discrimination by default. We tend to build a plastic bubble around ourselves so that we only have to associate with people just like us. And so, this suffering that still goes on in our country and around the world is very severe.
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Jimmy Carter

Nobel Prize for Peace

Jimmy Carter: The main thing that I tell young people -- I'm in my tenth year as a professor -- is that they're the ones that can change this country, can change the world. It's not an idle thing to say to students, but at the college age they have to realize that they have tremendous potential that they won't have five years later. For instance, they are in an environment, if they are in college, where there is a stirring of ideas and a balancing of different conflicting concepts. They have fellow students that might share a commitment to do something about, say, human rights, or environmental quality, or homelessness or whatever. They can seek advice from instructors, from professors, who are experts in those fields, or read. And another thing is that they have liberty that they won't have in the future. After they finish college, they're going to get married perhaps, or start making house payments, automobile payments, they'll have responsibilities maybe of a growing family. They will be employed by IBM or Coca-Cola Company or General Motors or maybe in a law firm or teaching school. They are going to be very reluctant to express ideas that would depart from the status quo, because they want to make sure that the principal of their school where they teach -- or their bosses at IBM or at the law firm -- don't think that they are radicals. So they are going to give up a lot of that freedom to say "This is wrong."
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Steve Case

Co-Founder, America Online

More than a decade ago we started investing in what we called parental controls, because we felt it was really important that kids had access to the Internet, but it's equally important that parents had some control over what they accessed. And rather than we deciding sort of on our own what was or wasn't appropriate for a particular child, we thought it was important to put those tools in the hands of each parent and let them decide. And some would be very strict and some would be very lenient, but ultimately we felt it was important for parents to decide.
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Steve Case

Co-Founder, America Online

We felt it was important, in a world where access was becoming more and more critical, that we not have a digital divide between the haves and the have-nots. So we created several initiatives, and even personally through our Case Foundation, created something called "Power Up," and built 1,000 technology centers, mostly in Boys and Girls Clubs, but also in YMCAs, churches and other places, to really provide access to computers and Internet in low income neighborhoods and housing projects, so that people -- when they went to school and some homework was assigned that required the use of the computer -- the kids who couldn't afford a computer at home could still participate and wouldn't be left behind.
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