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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Ehud Barak

Former Prime Minister of Israel

There was in the unit an emergency need to spread convoys of ammunition to maybe a dozen different points along the border, some of them 50 miles away from the boot camp. And as a result of the need to prepare at the same time all the units, there was a shortage of officers or NCOs that could lead an ammunition convoy to some desert place. The boot camp trainees were asked whether someone of us know how to read a map and can lead convoy a dark night to a certain position 50 miles from here. No one responded, and it seemed to be a kind of real emergency and I thought I can. So I raised my hand and I said simply, "I can do it." I had some experience in reading a map from summer camps and summer treks where I made the point of always knowing exactly where I was. So I get acquainted to looking at the map and it seemed to me that I understand it. I can read it. I still to this day remember the eyes of the battalion commander when he released me into the darkness kind of contemplating what will happen. If I cross the border with the convoy or something else, who will be responsible? But in a way he didn't have an alternative at the moment and he sent me.
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Ehud Barak

Former Prime Minister of Israel

In the Six Day War, I commanded a small reconnaissance unit, and it took us just four days to reach the Canal and immediately I asked myself, okay, nothing is going to happen here anymore so we jumped a few hundred miles to the other side. Maybe something will happen in the Golan Heights, and it happened that we came at the last hours of preparation for climbing on the Golan Heights, so we joined the Golan Heights battle as well, beginning at the northern edge and ending at Quneitra . But, you know, I'm smiling kind of recalling it now, but I should admit the first battles were quite a devastating -- kind of revealing -- experience.
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Ehud Barak

Former Prime Minister of Israel

My first real battle experience was in the Six Days War. A few operations before then, but on a small scale. And the real experience, the memories of tough, demanding psychological environment where most people are tending to lose their sense of direction and cohesion of action. The vehicles exploding around you, people killed, the bitter, sweet smell of human burned bodies all around, the feeling of being not in full control.
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Ehud Barak

Former Prime Minister of Israel

I still remember an operation where we had some of our pilots taken by the Egyptians during the war of attrition. They intercepted some of those with SAM missiles and we decided that the only way to convince the Egyptians to release them is by taking some Egyptian pilots and bring them to Israel and then suggest that we will kind of exchange them. And the only way that we found was to stop at a road leading to an Egyptian Air Force (base), back deep in the Nile Valley, by appearing as an Egyptian military police to move them from the road and to take over some pilots. I initiated such a raid and I was one of the two policemen with the motorcycles, fully dressed as an Egyptian MP with someone who talked Baladic -- kind of a street Egyptian -- much better than I could, in a much more convincing way, and we really made it. And we established a kind of check post on the road to an Egyptian Air Force base and we began to take vehicles at midnight. There was not a lot of transportation. We ended up with 40 people in some six or eight trucks and vehicles, and not a single man in uniform.
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Gary Becker

Nobel Prize in Economics

I didn't have a lot of universities interested in me. I've never gotten offers from the major institutions, aside from Chicago and Columbia. But I didn't consider that a setback. Chicago and Columbia were fine places, and I felt, well, that's the price of working on things that aren't so popular. So I accepted that. I didn't like it that my work wasn't received so well, but again, as I said earlier, I had this inner faith that I was right and they were wrong. I mean, I'll put it bluntly, that's what I felt. As did some of the people I respected so much, my teachers who had confidence in me, and a few other people, and that gave me further capacity to go on. So given my inner faith that what I was doing was important, it seemed obvious to me these are important problems and that I wasn't just a crazy man. There were some quite respected economists who thought I was doing important work, even though the bulk of the profession didn't. But that was enough for me. That kept me going. Everybody gets a little depressed, but I never went through any major depression over the fact that my work wasn't being accepted. I felt it will turn out to be that way. So I coped with my personal difficulties, with my wife's death. I remarried, a very fine marriage, my wife is here now, and she had two children who I'm very close to. So I sort of feel I have four children now, the two sons through her first marriage and my two daughters. So my personal life improved a lot. And finally, my work began to be accepted much more, I'd say sometime starting in the mid-'80s.
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Lee Berger

The Origins of Humanity

Lee Berger: A lot of my ideas were always pushing edges, pushing boundaries. No one's ever made a great discovery by surging behind a wave, and I was always pushing boundaries. I also took a stance in the late 1990s about open access to fossils. You've got to remember, it's very important to remember, that I'm almost the first generation of scientists -- people my age and just maybe a year older -- that were never without a computer. We are the first computer generation. I had one as a child. I've always had one. It makes us think differently. We're almost the Facebook generation of scientists. And in the late 1990s, there were some behavioral abnormalities within paleoanthropology that bothered me a lot, and I was in a very powerful position. A young man, made director and saving one of the most powerful chairs in the science of paleoanthropology, and I had fossils that had been found by other people -- albeit in the very distant past-- under my control. And in this science, those are resources. I decided to open them up, let everyone look at them. It now is called "open access." We didn't have a name for it at that time really. But took a relatively public stance on that, that I was going to let people see these fossils. It was not the way it was done.
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Lee Berger

The Origins of Humanity

I ended up in Savannah, Georgia, and I walked into a local TV station and said, "May I see the manager?" And he said -- well, the secretary for some reason said, "No." And I was standing there devastated and he walked by and he said, "Who's this?" And I said, "I'm Lee Berger and I'd like to work for you for free." And he went, "What?" And I said, "Really, I'm just fascinated by this." I'd had one video course, and I loved it, in college during that period. And he said, "I can't let you work for free." He said, "But you know, we've got the worst job in this place, which is the studio cameraman thing. I'm desperate to fill this. If you're willing to work for minimum wage and learn that thing, I'll do it." Three months later I was the head cameraman in that division. Four months later I was in charge of -- I was in the news camera division because I saw how exciting it was. I ended up in some wild things. I got hired by the leading station within a couple of months. Started the first night news program in Savannah, Georgia. Ended up saving a woman's life because I was caught in a weird circumstance where the police had gone up river in the Savannah River when they heard that a woman had fallen in the river. And I ended up downstream -- that's part of my Eagle Scout -- where I ended up downstream all alone, and there went a woman going by. And my job was to film and I had to make a decision instantly: film this woman -- but the next stop is the Atlantic Ocean -- or not. And I dropped my camera, which they were very fragile and very expensive back then, and jumped in and brought her in. And that was an amazing moment for me because it brought a lot of attention to me nationally. It occurred just after an event where some reporters had filmed a woman who'd set herself on fire. I ended up as this young guy amongst professional reporters in this national debate of right or wrong if the press intervenes. I wasn't prepared for it. I realized how woefully unprepared I was to suddenly be launched into the profession of journalism.
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