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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: The dean in those days had a dinner early in the term for all the women in the first-year class, and I think he kept it up until the number of women exceeded 20. In any case, after dinner he brought us into his living room, and each of us sat next to a distinguished professor, invited to be our escort, and he asked [us] to tell him what we were doing in the law school occupying a seat that could be held by a man. Now he did not mean that question to wound. Harvard had only recently begun to accept women, didn't accept women until 1950, 1951, and I came there in 1956, only five years after they started to admit women. There were still some doubting Thomases on the faculty, and the dean wanted the women's answers about what they were doing in law school to arm him with responses to those members of the faculty who still resisted admitting women. So he wanted women's stories so he could report those to his faculty colleagues.
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Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court

The hardest thing for my colleagues to accept was when we -- and by we, I mean the ACLU women's rights project, which I helped to found -- challenged the TIAA CREF program, and the retirement program used by most colleges and universities, because they rigidly separated the policy beneficiaries by sex. So they used mortality tables for men, for women. And the women would get less when they retired than a man with equivalent salary and time in service. The reason was that on average it's fair, because women on average live longer than men. And my view was, "Yes, that's certainly true on average, but there are some men who live long and some women who die early." And the whole notion is that you don't lump together women simply because they are women, and that TIAA CREF should merge their mortality tables. Well, the immediate response was, "Horrors! We just couldn't do that. Then all the men would desert the plan and get private insurance." Well, TIAA CREF was such a good deal that when they did finally merge the tables, nobody left. But that was the most worrisome thing to my faculty colleagues. Even so, they supported a class action that was brought -- with 100 named plaintiffs -- on behalf of women teachers and administrators at Columbia, charging that maintaining separate mortality tables essentially denied women equal pay, and was in violation of our foremost anti-discrimination law, Title VII.
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Rudolph Giuliani

Former Mayor of New York City

Rudolph Giuliani: Fighting prostate cancer, having to accept the fact that you had cancer -- my father died of prostate cancer -- having to figure out how to deal with it, had a big impact one me. It probably helped a lot to understand some of what people were going through on September 11 -- having to face mortality, having to face death, having to face these perplexing questions of why someone is alive and why someone else is dead. Why does someone get cancer and someone else doesn't? Why does someone who is standing on the north side of the building live and a person standing on the south side of the building die? What about the person that came to work that day late and lived? Or the person that decided that they were going to walk into the World Trade Center just to see someone, and they had never been there before, and they died? Those are the questions that perplex human beings. And when you have to face that in your life, you either grow or you recede. And I think that having prostate cancer helped me to grow, philosophically, religiously, so that at least I had that perspective when I had to deal with my own losses on September 11. The danger that I was in, the risk, and then the tremendous losses that so many other people had that were even greater than mine.
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Rudolph Giuliani

Former Mayor of New York City

The first report that I got of the number of losses at the World Trade Center was 12,000 or more; and the reason it ended up being less than 3,000 -- which is still a horrific, horrible number -- but the only reason that that difference occurred is because of the way in which they handled the evacuation. And a lot of it was just plain bravery, just the fact that they were willing to stay there -- even knowing in large part the risk -- and more or less not abandon the ship, stay there with the ship. And it created a sense of calm that allowed the evacuation to take place in an orderly way. Because one of the things that did not happen at the World Trade Center -- which I think people who deal with emergencies would say can happen, and maybe if you did a fiction account of it, you would include in it -- is a lot of people being trampled, a lot of people being killed in the evacuation. And even when the first building went down, the evacuation continued to be fast, swift, but orderly, and people weren't killed as a result of the evacuation. I give a lot of the credit for that, if not all of it, to the firefighters and the police officers, the rescue workers, and then the group of civilians that acted as heroes that we just are never going to know about. I know about some of those stories, because I was so close to it, but you never know about all of them.
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Rudolph Giuliani

Former Mayor of New York City

People would get very excited, and I would say to myself, "Okay, now, you've got to remain calmer, and you've got to think your way through this." I remember a couple weeks later, when I was headed for wakes in the suburbs north of New York, and I was going to go by helicopter, and I got a call from the head of the Office of Emergency Management that four planes were unaccounted for, and they were headed for New York and we had to ground everything. And it turned out that -- you might remember this -- that is when I think it ended up being two planes were off-course, and they had to be guided down. But there was a point at which we thought there would be another attack on the city. And I remember saying to myself then -- and things like that probably happened a dozen times in that four or five-week period -- and I remember saying to myself: "Okay, remain calm. Get calmer. Remember what your father said, and then we'll figure out how we deal with this."
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Whoopi Goldberg

Actress and Activist

Whoopi Goldberg: I don't know if it's guts, I think it is. I think of guts as something that gives you that Kirk Douglas look. But I think what I mean is the knowledge that it is okay to feel differently than the pack. That that is a fundamental right. That it's okay to disagree. It's better to be able to disagree and have a dialogue, than to go along with the pack and be truly unhappy. I don't want to be truly unhappy. I mean, there's enough out there to piss me off. You know, to bother me. I'm sorry, there's enough out there to bother me.
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