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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Edward Albee

"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?"

I made one experiment. I said, "All right. Everybody tells me that this is a collaborative art." Something that I've never believed, by the way. It is a creative act, and then there are people who do it for you. With one play I said, "Okay. All these people think they're so bright. I will do whatever they want." Without changing the text. And, I put up with a lot of stuff that I didn't like very much, or didn't really approve of. It was a fiasco. And, if I'm going to have a fiasco, I want it to be on my terms. I like to take my own credit and my own blame because I can make as many mistakes as the next person, you know. But, I think my mistakes are more interesting.
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Tenley Albright

Olympic Gold Medal Figure Skater

When I got out of the hospital, the doctors told my parents, "Parents aren't going to want any of their children to play with her because they will be afraid they will catch polio," even though they wouldn't, but still, not enough was known about it. They said, "The best thing for her is to let her do whatever she has done before that she liked to do. Skating would be a good thing, since that's something she did." I remember very clearly going to the rink that first time -- it seemed huge after being in the hospital so long -- and hanging on to the barrier, sort of creeping along it, and staying down at one end. But when I found that my muscles could do some things, it made me appreciate them more. I've often wondered if maybe the reason it appealed to me so much was that I had a chance to appreciate my muscles, knowing what it was like when I couldn't use them.
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Tenley Albright

Olympic Gold Medal Figure Skater

My stomach flipped, I felt nauseated. I felt weak, because of the horror of what I had just seen and had to take care of. But I couldn't let myself feel that way until it was all right to. And that's part of the surgical mind too, addressing what you need to, and you know you can do, and postponing how you feel about it, thinking only of the patient and what you need to do.
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Stephen Ambrose

Biographer and Historian

Stephen Ambrose: My first wife, who I loved dearly -- and my two oldest children she is the mother of -- killed herself when I was 29 years old, and she was 27, and she had been in Phipps Clinic at Hopkins Hospital for a year. And she killed herself, which was -- leaving me with two kids that I'd been living with -- just the two kids for the whole year that she had been in the hospital. That was rough, difficult, hard. I couldn't exaggerate it.
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Stephen Ambrose

Biographer and Historian

Moira and I found it very hard to listen to Nixon. That morning's headlines had been "a new record tonnage of bombs" had been dropped on Cambodia, and the stories in the papers were about free fire zones and napalm, and, and we just couldn't take it. So we started to heckle, and as the national press reported, "From the faculty section, obscenities were hurled at the President." And it was true, because the heckling that we did was "Free fire zones! Napalm! B-52s!" And halfway through I was --Moira was really louder than I was on this, I've got to say, with whatever feeling about it. I said, "We gotta get out of here. I can't take this." And we go. And we were front row center. We got up and walked out on the President. Well the reaction in Kansas! I had just arrived, I had this prestigious title, and I'd insulted the President. And they wanted to fire me. And I was -- yeah, I was 35, I guess. Thirty-three, and had five kids. When I married Moira, she had three kids. You know, I didn't have any money. I mean, I had a nice salary -- the biggest salary I'd ever had -- when I got that chair, but I didn't have any savings or anything like that. And I was looking at getting fired in September. We had just committed to a house, had a huge mortgage on the house, and so on. That was a difficult time.
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