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Key to success: Vision Key to success: Passion Key to success: Perseverance Key to success: Preparation Key to success: Courage Key to success: Integrity Key to success: The American Dream Keys to success homepage More quotes on Passion More quotes on Vision More quotes on Courage More quotes on Integrity More quotes on Preparation More quotes on Perseverance More quotes on The American Dream


Kiri Te Kanawa

Beloved Opera Singer

I just went like a mad thing through the front door. And everyone was there. Of course, it's once again the circus. That "bzzzz" that's going on. And there's every man and his dog is there trying to give you information. And there's the director trying to do something and the conductor's there. Of course, Jimmy's there. And Jon Vickers is there. And they're all there. And you think, "Shut up and get out!" And I just said, "I just need time." So somehow people threw a wig on me and some makeup and we were on. We're on the number 52 bus to heaven. So it was like that. It was just this absolute panic. And then I got through the first act. And I thought, "Thank God!" And you know, no one -- none of my family -- my singing teacher was going to be there in a few weeks to come and see my first performance. And my husband, who was then, was going to come. And all my friends were going to come. And I couldn't get them, because it was snowing. And it was just -- it was impossible. So I went on, the loneliest person in the world.
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Wayne Thiebaud

Painter and Teacher

Wayne Thiebaud: Pies and cakes and the hot dogs, those things. So Allan also -- Allan Stone, the dealer -- was very puzzled by them, and it took him a year or two to get to a point of saying, "Before I got the courage to show the damn thing," was the way he put it. And that's quite a mark of his ability and loyalty, to take me on and see what he could do. We didn't have very many hopes. He said to me, "I think you're a good painter. I don't know about these, but we'll show them and we'll show them. I'll try to get a plan of about five to ten years where we keep showing things of yours in the hope you gain a kind of clientele." And that's what we did. So it was a big shock to find that, serendipitously, pop art came in, and we were sort of shunted into that sudden interesting world, that is, interesting to critics and interesting to people. And that's how really it occurred.
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Michael Thornton

Medal of Honor

I guess if you sat down and thought about it afterwards, you'd probably go, "Why did we do that? What are we doing here?" But when you get back from a mission -- you don't really think about it during a mission. Or you're in a heavy fire fight and your mission is a heavily involved contact one. And when you get back you don't really let that -- you can't concentrate on that. You can't sit there and say, "Geez, I almost didn't make it," or you wouldn't operate again. You just wipe it out of your mind and you go on. And you gather -- you have almost a sixth sense when you run operations. You feel things almost before they happen. It's hard to explain to somebody that's never been there what it's like to work in an area where you're outnumbered.
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Michael Thornton

Medal of Honor

"Nasty," he says, "I don't see the Qua Viet river, which means we're not where we're supposed to be." So he should have been able to pick it up on the starlight scope. And I said, "Okay, Mike." And he'd kind of look at me, you know, like -- "You nut, we're not where we're supposed to be." And he'd go back to the back of the line and off we'd go and patrol some more. And you know, every time we'd stop he'd let me know that, you know, "Hey, dumb-dumb, we're not where we're supposed to be!"
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Michael Thornton

Medal of Honor

They threw a grenade over on my side and I threw the grenade back. Well, in America the grenades are four seconds, "1,000, 2,000, 3,000, 4,000 " the grenade goes off. So they throw the grenade back over, and I'm going, "5,000, 6,000 " I throw the grenade back. I'm going, "8,000, 9,000..." and this grenade comes over again. And I know this grenade -- and the grenade went off. I rolled over and the grenade went off, and I was hit seven times with shrapnel in my back. So I yelled out, and I could hear Tommy yelling for me and I wouldn't say nothing and about that time these other three guys came over the top of the sand dune, and I shot one of them and one fell down on my side, and the other two fell back. Well, when that happened -- for some reason they quit their offensive. They quit coming forward.
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Michael Thornton

Medal of Honor

The radioman comes back -- Dang was the radioman. He comes back by himself. Like I said, I had already been hit and he comes back and he has two bullet rounds in through the back of the radio where he had shrapnel in his back, and he says, "Mike, Da Wei's dead! Da Wei's dead!" And I just remembered -- you know, I said, "Are you sure?" And he said, "Yeah." And I just remembered the last position I saw Tommy when I left. So I jumped, grabbed my gun and I went running back up there and I saw Tommy laying on the side and I thought Tommy was dead. The bullet had entered the side of his head over here and came out -- Thomas Norris: Blew out this whole portion of my head. Michael Thornton: -- and the whole side of his head was completely gone. I grabbed Tommy. At this time we were being overrun at the position. So I got down in a kneeling position and I shot several guys right there. When they saw me -- that I was there, they stopped and they started firing and I grabbed Tommy and put him on my shoulders and started to run with him. Well I didn't know that Tommy had told the Newport News to fire for effect. Well, the first round came in, and the concussion hit and it blew me like 20 feet in the air! And I'm watching Tommy's body fly off my shoulders and he hits the ground like a "kabloop!" Like that. And I get up, and I'm dazed, but luckily the round hit behind me a little bit to the south, and it really got these guys' attention. So I went over and I grabbed Tommy to pick him up. I'm dazed from the concussion and he says, "Mike, buddy." And I knew he was still alive.
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Michael Thornton

Medal of Honor

So I picked him up and I stick him underneath of my arms because I was fine like that, and I stuck his head underneath the water and I feel all this flapping going like that and it was him! And I took him and I grabbed him and I put him in front of me and I started swimming. Well, when I started swimming with Tommy, the young Vietnamese, Kwan, which was one of the Vietnamese that I had picked, comes flying by me. The surf has pushed him in. He got shot through his right buttocks and he couldn't use his leg. So I grabbed him. I put him on my back. He was on my shoulders. I had Tommy in front of me like this with his arms --I had him wrapped and I told Dang to hold his arms. And I'm breast stroke swimming like that. And I'm swimming and all I could do is see all these bullets just flying into the water. After we got past the surf zone they just kept flying past us. And after we got out of the range of fire, the Newport News -- I saw them turn around and leave. I said, "Where in the hell are they going?" You know. Well I guess this forward observer had told them all they saw was a bunch of people jumping up and down, and they were called off the line, and they thought we all were dead.
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